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Full text of "Halcyon"

D 




Published by the Junior Class of Swarthmore College 




President Joseph Swain 



In Recog'nition 

Of nineteen years of unceasing devotion 
and service, evidenced by her more than 
doubled capacity and the ever-increasing 
spread of her fame and good name, Alma 
Mater, through the Halcyon, her spokes- 
man, here expresses her love and grati- 
tude by this dedication to 

President Joseph Swain 



Swartl)more's faster !&uil6cr 

(Dr. ^liller and Dean Alexander, as those two Swarthmoreans 
who have known President Swain longest and most intiniatel}-, were 
asked to write articles about him for the Halcyon. The results fol- 
low, one in the form of a letter, the other as an article ) : 



Dear Mr. Editor : 

It is \\ith great pleasure that I undertake to comply with your 
request. I am afraid. howe\-er, that I cannot ap]>roach the cjuestion of 
Dr. Swain's personal qualities in a judicial manner. Thirt_\--fi\-e ^•ears 
of intimate association — always helpful to me — has led me to endow 
him with almost superhuman qualities. He was my course adviser 
and teacher for four undergraduate years and for one graduate year. 
I taught in two universities in a department of which he was the head. 
Since 1895, I ha\e been a professor in an institution of which he was 
president. The self-same qualities which characterize him as a great 
teacher and a great colleague ha\'e made him a great president. In 
each of these capacities he has been a leader, — a leader of an ever-in- 
creasing throng of forceful men and \\omen ; a throng that contains 
neither a drone nor a weakling. 

He believes in the gospel of work. He has worked ver}'' hard 
himself and found great joy in it. It was a tradition among his stu- 
dents that no one ever came to his classes unprepared. He has an un- 
compromising sense of loyalty, to an ideal, to a cause to which he de- 
votes himself. To such a cause he gave his best powers, enlisted the 
best in others, and he never was contented until the best that could be 
obtained was a part of such an institution. 

He engenders the same spirit of loyalt\- in his co-workers. His 
students of ^Mathematics (Dr. Swain was a professor of Mathematics) 
are students of Mathematics now, located in the colleges and univer- 
sities of this country. Many of them have contributed to the mathe- 
matical literature of the country either in the way of books or to the 
leading" mathematical journals. The same spirit pervaded his facul- 
ties. They were as 103'al to the institution as he was, and this loyalty 
was built upon the foundation stone of belief in the cause, and the be- 
lief that Joseph Swain had engendered, in some w'ay other than by 



words, that he ahvays gave fair treatment. He rarely ]jroniise(l any- 
thing" but opportunity to \vorI<: ; Init if lie (Vn\ promise, he g'ave more 
than he promised. 

He is a rare judge' of men, of the possibilities latent in an under- 
graduate, of the effectiveness of a teacher, of the clearness of vision 
of an alumnus. In every institution with which he has been connected, 
he has instinctively found those who naturally would give to the insti- 
tution friendship, or influence, or money, or all of them. 

His vision as an educational leader is excellent. He became presi- 
dent of Indiana University, his Alma Mater, in 1893. I think, as I 
write, of the number of policies he initiated there that have since grown 
into gigantic forces working- for the universit_y and for the spiritual 
welfare of the place, and marvel at his foresight. The phenomenal 
growth of Swarthmore in the nineteen years of his administration 
shows that he is a practical seer. In these tw-enty-seven years, too, a 
great number of fads have come above the educational horizon. Some 
of these have proved their worth and, strengthened and modified, have 
become integral parts of the American colleg'e curriculum. Others 
have not. It is an interesting fact that those new things that were 
tried in the colleges of which he w-as president were in the former class. 

Joseph Swain has a great body, a great intellect, and a great heart, 

but the greatest of these is his heart. 

John A. Miller. 



President Joseph Swain will be known in the annals of Swarth- 
more as a master builder. His craftsmanship was tested at Indiana 
University where, under his leadership, the Universitv was placed on 
a firm financial basis and the growth in buildings and ecjuipment kept 
pace with the demands of the times. During his administration, ex- 
tending over a period of almost twenty years, Swarthmore's endow- 
ment has been increased sevenfold, and every building on the campus 
is either new or enlarged. This record alone would make Dr. Swain's 
place in Swarthmore's history secure. 

As a builder of material things he is great, but he is greater as a 
builder of men. He has unusual power in making people believe in 
themselves. There are men in all parts of the world who were in- 
spired by Dr. Swain to do things which they themselves thought thev 



could not do. He is a great frien<l. He knows how to earn friend- 
ship. Sometimes he puts up witli all sorts of incon\eniences in the 
process of adjusting himself to some one else's personality. Some- 
times he accepts grave annoyances and cruel disillusionment as a por- 
tion, and then \vea\es them into the whole pattern with skill and toler- 
ance. He has the unselfishness and sacrifice required for the give and 
take of friendship. Being always prepared to pay the price of adjust- 
ing his wishes and plans to those of some one else, he establishes a 
well grounded, deeply founded friendship. His deep concern for the 
welfare of his students and friends, the encouragement, adA^ice and 
inspiration which he gave to others is his greatest work. 

A Swarthmore man writing from the Middle \\'est attests this 
fact in the following words, "No longer than I have been out here, 
I have met scores of people who were directly influenced by Dr. Swain 
and who regard him almost as a father." A prominent administrator 
in educational work pays him this tribute : "I have acted upon his 
judg-ment in critical cases as I ha\'e not upon the judgment of any 
other man. His big, hearty sympathy and his common-sense grasp 
of situations have united to make him the sort of a friend that one 
prizes most highly." Another man, a life-long friend, prominent in 
the educational life of the nation, says, "He lo\-es folks. His friend- 
ship never wavers. He is always the same, never blows hot or cold. 
He never goes ofif at a tangent, but is always sane, considerate, kind, 
agreeable, honest. He never indulges in tricks or sharp practices. He 
is never envious or jealous. He sees the good points in all persons, 
his friends and others (so far as I know, he has had few if any 
enemies)." 

One who is associated intimately in business with President Swain 
knows him to be a great teacher, who has penetrated to the heart of 
human nature. With a business associate, his attitude is that of a 
friend. He impresses one as exceedingly human, and in this way 
merits one's confidence. In another way he Ijecomes a learned judge 
or recognized expert. He inspires one to do things because one be- 
lieves that he has the wisdom to direct. It is always easy to do the 
thing that Dr. Swain wants one to do. A Swarthmore man success- 
ful in scientific research and in business expresses what many have 
found to be true when he says, "The big influence, and a very impor- 
tant one, too, that Dr. Swain had on my career was his practice and 



recommendation of always going along on an even keel and consider- 
ing matters from a jjroad, basic angle, rather than fly off half-cocked, 
because of immediate situations without considering the larger situa- 
tions. He always advised me to try to turn a bad situation into a good 
situation." 

I know a man in the Middle West whose tone of voice, geniality 
and genuineness draw men to him. In many respects he is much like 
Dr. Swain. He lavishes time, interest and inspiration upon the thou- 
sands of students with whdm he comes in contact. His judgment of 
men seldom if e\'er goes wrong, and this judgment was never sounder 
than when he said of his friend and former colleague, "A great char- 
acteristic of Dr. Swain is his ability to find the good things in the 
people with whom he comes in contact. He believes that every one 
has a good side and tliat, if this is developed, it will crowd out the evil. 
Time after time, I ha\"e heard persons criticized in the presence of Dr. 
Swain, and almost invariably he would mention some good quality in 
that person. In all my life, I never saw a man more generous toward 
his fellow men. This could not mean that he indorses evil. On the 
contrary, I know of no man who hates sin more than he. He hates 
sin but loves the sinner ; because he sees in the sinner a person who 
can eventuall}' see and do the good thing's in life." 

The strong man is not too sensitive. ^ He does not assume that 
whene\'er he puts his best foot foremost somebody is going to tread on 
it. He is not looking for trouble. He is too busy to imagine that some- 
body lower down or higher up "has it in" for him. He plugs away 
at his work and lets the work answer for itself. The strong man deals 
little in post-mortems over past misdeeds. If he goes back again to 
the beginnings, it is that he may take a fresh hold, not that he ma}^ 
dig sometliing up that were better dead and buried. He wastes little 
time in repairing broken resolutions, and the spiritual \'oltage that 
might be fretted away in remorse he uses to drive himself forward. 
The strong man "does things." He acts while others doubt. On 
absolute frankness he insists, and he cannot get along with an}- who 
ecjuivocate. He has courage and inspires courage, and he puts all bis 
strength into helping those whom he finds around him. Such a strong 
man is Joseph Swain. 

William Albert Alexander. 




President- Elect Frank Aydelotte 



"^t^i/wiiiw 




By Dnniei Chester French 



Engraved hrj Thnothtf Coir 



DEATH AND THE SCULPTOR 



THE PASSING OF THREE GREAT 
MOULDERS OF SWARTHMORE 




3saac 31 <riotl)ier 



Eleventh Month 5, 1837 



First Month 15, 1921 



10 



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Susan 3. (Tunningljam 

Third Month 23, 1842 First Month 23, 1921 



11 




Robert ytl. Iianm'2 

Ninth Month 18, 1851 Eighth Month 26, 1920 



12 



Hn Mlemoriam 




Class of 1920 




I3l)omas ^'Coward Atkinson 




Sixth Month 28, 1898 Seventh Month 29, 


1920 


Class of 1922 




(Beorge Narrows ^cdlellatt 




Third Month 13, 1899 Tenth Month 28, 


1920 


Class of 1923 




yL\c\)axh^i.o\x\s IKlnsmait 




Eighth Month 28, 1899 Sixth Month 19, 


1920 



13 



/ 



■•••■•^(^ 




(Lontents 

BEFORE THE MIRROR 
ALMA MATER 

CLASSES 

FRATERNITIES 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

ACTIVITIES 

ATHLETICS 

BEHIND THE MIRROR 



I 

) 





14 




A. Laurence Baxter 
Francis C. Blair 
Edith Cugley 
G. Morton Daller 

WiLLARD S. ElSBREE 

Ella Falck 
Walton C. Ferris 
Elizabeth Griscom 
John M. Hilgert 



Herbert L. Hutchinson 
Henrietta Keller 
F. Norton Landon 
Marian Satterthwaite 
Paul Sharpless 
Howard K. Shaw 
Richard W. Slocum 
Winnie Weihenmayer 
Carolien White 



li) 



Ol)e Alumni Association 

In the fall of 1869 Swarthmore College opened its doors to students, 
and graduated its first class in June, 1873. On the 8th of May, 1875, a 
meeting of the classes of '7}t and '74 was held for the purpose of organizing 
an Alumni Association, and a committee was appointed to draft a constitu- 
tion. The two classes met again. May 29th, 1875, adopted a constitution 
and elected officers, the President being Maria C. Pierce, '7}>, and the 
Secretary, Mary Hibbard, '74. The other officers were as follows : Vice 
Presidents, Herman Hoopes, '74; Lowndes Taylor, '7i\ Elizabeth C. Miller, 
'7i ; Treasurer, Esther T. Moore, '73 ; Executive Committee, Ferris W. 
Price, '74, Helen Magill, '7i, and Ellen H. Evans, '74. The charter of the 
Association was obtained in 1881 and the Association was incorporated 
January 16th, 1882. 

The purpose of this Association is best told in the words of Article 11, 
of the Constitution, namely — "The object of this Association shall be to 
promote union and good feeling among Alumni, and to advance in all proper 
ways the interests of Swarthmore College." In pursuance of this ideal the 
Alumni Association has been most keenly interested in many of the activities 
of the college and its pressing needs. 

In September, 1878, William Seaman, Joseph T. Bunting and Edward 
Martin were appointed on a committee to confer with the Athletic Associa- 
tion of the College "to encourage and increase interest in sports.'' From 
this time to the present, similar committees have been appointed and the 
Alumni ha\e aided the college athletics both materially and also by timely 
encouragement and advice. 

Soon after the fire in 1881, money was collected for buying books for 
the library, and about ten years later the Alumni Library Endowment Fund 
was established. The money contributed toward this was invested, and 
the income is used annually to purchase new books. 

The interest of the Alumni Association in the "Phoenix" has never 
flagged and there ha\e been Alumni "Phoenix" Committees and Alumni 
Editors of the "Phoenix" throughout its career. 

The Alumni have shown their loyalty and interest in the College in 
many ways, working sometimes through the organ of the Association and 
sometimes individually. In times of financial crisis in the college history, 
the members of the Association have contributed liberalh'. Several portraits 
that hang in Parrish Hall are the gifts of Alumni and it has become a custom 
for the classes to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of their graduation 
by bestowing some gift upon their Alma Mater. The Library Chimes, the 
'89 Gateway, the Sproul Observatory, the oaks along the walks to Wharton 
Hall, and various other gifts bear testimony to this happy custom. 



16 



For many years the Alumni business meeting was lield on tiie aflerntjon 
of Commencement Day, and the banquet which \velc(jmes tiie graduating 
class to the company of Alumni occurred the evening of the same da)'. 
Occasionally, when there was some special reason for doing so, an invitation 
was extended to all ex-members of graduated classes, as well as to the 
graduates of the college, to attend this Alumni Banquet, and in 1905 it was 
decided to extend this privilege each year. In 1906 yVlumni Uay was 
established. This day belongs wholly to Alumni and ex-students, and all 
the activities of the day are carried on by them. Class reunions are held, 
class gifts are presented to the College, there is a business meeting where 
many things pertaining to the welfare of the College are considered, games 
are played, the Senior Play in the outdoor auditorium is repeated, and last 
but not least, there is the dimier in honor of the graduating class, where 
most inspiring speeches for the betterment and advancement of the college 
are delivered, as there are among the Alumni and ex-students many men 
and women who possess the happy faculty of expressing their loyalty and 
the loyalty of the whole body of Swarthmoreans in a most effecti\'e and 
delightful way. 



^^e Swartl)more (ToUege .-Alumni .-Association 

Officers for 1920-21 
President 



Francis W. D'Olier, '07 



John R. Sproul, '17 - 
Nora Stabler Worth, '03 
Maurice E. Griest, '04 



Vice Presidents 



Moorestown, N. J. 



Chester 

Bryn Mawr 

Hamilton, Ohio 



Secretary and Treasurer 
Abby Mary Hall Roberts, '90 - - - 



Swarthmore 



Directors 
Term Expires June, 1921 



Charles Palmer, '82 
Charles T. Brown, '98 
David D. Rowlands, '09 

George H. Brooke, '93 
Channing Way, '97 - 
Helen S. Brown, '00 



Term Expires June, 1922 



Chester 

Moorestown, N. J. 

Sheboygan, ^^'is. 

Philadelphia 

West Chester 

Moorestown. N. J- 



17 



X^estern Swartl)more (Tlub 

Tlie Western Swarthmore Club was organized in December, 1903. It started 
at an informal dinner where about a dozen former Swarthmoreans had gathered 
to listen to ex-President Magill. A happy suggestion resulted in the immediate 
formation of the Chicago Swarthmore Club. Upon electing Francis E. Broomell, 
'93, Secretary and Treasurer, the Club began to take on a larger aspect. It was 
reorganized and named the Western Swarthmore Club, with the membership 
now over four hundred. 

Each year the Western Swarthmore Club sends a scholar to Swarthmore. 
This scholar must be a graduate of a well-established school of the college 
preparatory type, located west of the Allegheny Mountains. The scholarship 
is competitive and is given to the applicant who best fulfills the requirements of 
(1) excellence and force of character, (2) capacity as shown by success in 
studies and other school activities, and (3) good physique and excellence in 
exercises and sports. 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



(Bovcrnlng ^oar6 



c.\rroll h. sudler, '88 

Fred M. Simons, Jr., '09 

Harry A. Olin, '19 

Arthur G. Hoadley, '02 



William T. Battin, '96 
Francis G. Blair, '97 
Francis E. Broomell, '93 
Howard S. Evans, '03 
Roland B. Flitcraft, ex-'99 
Russell C. Hoadley, '10 
T. Atkinson Jenkins, '87 
William V. Kerns, '13 
William S. Marshall, '88 
Marshall Pancoast, '99 



James J. Schock, '13 
Feed M. Simons, Jr.. '09 
Ralph Stone, '89 
Carroll H. Sudler, '88 
Mrs. William E. Sweet, '88 
Newton E. Tarble, '13 
Mark Thistlewaite, '01 
James E. Verree, '83 
I. Daniel Webster, '89 
Conrad A. Wickam, '11 
Edith M. Winder, '01 



18 



(Tlub 5cl)olars 

1906 — MuKAT Louis Johnson, Ky. 1914 — Jess JIalsteau, Wis. 

1907 — Clyde Insley Blanciiard, Mo. 1915 — Allin Hugh PrEucE, Iowa. 

1908 — Alice Elizabeth Masten, IikI. 1916 — Mary Alexander Campbell, Ky. 

1909 — James Jacob Schock, Okla. 1916 — Francis Arthur Jenkins, 111. 

1910 — Edwin Adams Lucas. 111. 1917 — Lanta I-L\stings, 111. 

1911 — Lelia Eloise Vest, Iowa. 1918 — Walton Canby Ferris, Wis. 

1912 — John Ewing Orchard, Neb. 1919 — Silas Marion Warner, Ind. 

1913 — Clarence Gates Mmirs, Iowa. 1920 — William Leigh Early, S. D. 

^I)e^i)ila6elpl)ia Swartl)more (Tlub 

Although the Philadelphia Swarthmore Club is not a perfected organization, 
the attendance of its annual meeting and banquet shows the increasing interest 
and enthusiasm of its members. Instead of a president and officers, a committee, 
varying from ten to fifteen, arranges the club's afifairs, including the yearly 
meeting. The members of this committee are appointed by the retiring toast- 
master each year. Gerritt E. Weaver, '82, the first chairman, instilled the spirit 
of goodfellowship which still binds the club together. After his death, Howard 
Cooper Johnson, '96, managed the club for ten years until 1916, when lie retired. 
Percival Parrish, '96, has since headed the committee. 




19 



yidw ^orK Swartl)more (Tlub 

About one hundred Swarthmoreans in and about the country's metropolis 
have formed the well known '.'Swarthmore Club of New York." Each year 
two reunions are held, the Fall Smoker, and a dinner. Their purpose is to 
cause the continuance of interest and support in things associated with the 
college on the hill. 

These aims were certainly perpetuated in the Fall Smoker given last De- 
cember 10. Over two score members gathered 'round the festive board to talk 
of old times, listen to talks from noted Swarthmoreans, and enjoy the 
terpischorean proclivities exhibited by John Dudley, '21, Lanta Hastings, '22, 
and Jerome Cope, '24 ; and this latter entertainment was only rivaled by the 
pristine grace and musical abilities of Walter E. Roberts, '08. 

But the hit of the evening was made by Doctor Isabelle Bronk, active head 
of the French department, and erstwhile after dinner speaker. Although it 
was her first experience at a smoker, she rose to the situation with such success 
that she was unanimously elected an honorary member of the club. 

Robert W. Maxwell, ex-'07, otherwise known as "Tiny" and sports editor 
of the Public Ledger, spoke on the football season till train time. A business 
session followed in which a favorable discussion of the proposed trip of the 
Glee and Instrumental Clubs to New York occupied a good share of the time. 

The results of the election of officers follows : 
President — Edward P. Palmer, '06 51 N. Columbus Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Secretary and Treasurer — Henry C. Farson 30 Church St., New York City 

t&oar6 of Governors 

Isaac R. Coles, '79 W. Laurie Seaman, '15 

Joseph A. Dickinson, '81 J. S. Carswell, '16 

John L. Carver, '93 William S. Clark, '17 

Edward D. Hubbard, '98 Henry C. Turner, '93 

Walter Krider, '09 Frederick A. Seaman. '83 



^ew ^ork Swartl)more Somen's (Tlub 

The object of the New York Swarthmore Women's Club is to keep Swarth- 
more alumnae in New York in touch with each other and with Swarthmore, 
and to advertise and forward the college whenever and wherever it can. The 
club holds two afternoon meetings a year, one social and one business and social. 
It is a rule of the club to have a representative from the college present to 
bring the latest news. 

All classes except the very earliest are represented at the meetings. About 
one hundred members pay the small dues. The officers are as follows : 

President _ - - _ _ Grace Brosius Biddle, '97 

Secretary and Treasurer - - - Anna M. Michener, '16 

"Executive (TommtUec 

One Year to Serve Two Years to Serve 

Alice S. Palmer, '89 May G. Rambo, '04 

Anna H. WuRTZ, ex-'03 Auguste Jellinghans. '15 

Virginia G. Viskniskki, '98 Phebe Seaman, '19 

20 



Ol)e Swartl)more Alumnae (Ilub 
of i:H)vla6elpl)la 

The Swarthmore Alumnae Club of I'hiladelphia was organized early in 
the spring of 1918 by a group of alumnae living in and near Philadel]jhia. 

The purposes of the club are to promote the interests of Swartlimore 
College, and to encourage united action among Swarthmore women in all branches 
of public service. Membership is open to all interested Swarthmore alumnae 
and ex-students. The dues are one dollar a year. 

The club contributes to the support of the Bureau of Occupations for 
trained women. It also has corporate membership in the Association of Col- 
legiate Alumnae (Philadelphia Branch), and representation, through two dele- 
gates, on the Philadelphia Collegiate Alumnae Council. This council was formed 
last year to serve as an organizing center for the public activities of women 
from all colleges. 

Regular meetings are held in November, January and March. On No- 
vember the 6th, a luncheon was held in the City Club. The big meeting of the 
year occurred on the 29th of January when an open forum followed by a tea 
was held in the Bellevue. 



The officers are as follows : 

President _ - - 

Vice President - 
Secretary _ - - 

Treasurer 



Ethel Hampson Brewster. '07 

Lydia p. Roberts, '97 

Esther F. Holmes, '18 

Phoebe L. Miller, '12 



Marie B. Darlington, '14 
Louise Marie Lawton, '13 



executive (Tommltl'ce 

Beatrice Newcomer White, '18 
Anna B. Lamb, '09 
Grace F. Lee, '10 



21 



Ol)e 15. Iff. iDudbY jperKiits !5ttemorial 
Scl)olarsl)ip 

This scholarship provides for the board and tuition of one young 
man from an Eastern preparatory school. It was gi\en for the academic 
j'ear 1920-1921, and will be given in future, to the best young man 
candidate as judged by a committee of the faculty appointed for the 
purpose by the President of the College. The award is made and the 
following points determined by the credentials from the secondary school 
of which the successful candidate is a graduate: 

First. Qualities of manhood, force of character and leadership, 
50 points. 

Second. Literary and scholastic ability and attainments, 30 points. 

Third. Physical vigor as shown by participation in out-of-door 
sports or in other ways, 20 points. 

These requirements are similar to the conditions of the Rhodes 
Scholarship. This scholarship is founded in honor of T. H. Dudley 
Perkins, Swarthmore, 1906, who died in the service of his country on 
Tenth Month 20th, 1918. The qualifications required of the holder 
of this scholarship are such as Dudley Perkins possessed in a marked 
degree. The donors of this scholarship are his wife, Alice Sullivan 
Perkins, '04 ; his sister, Marion Perkins Jessup, '94 ; and his brother, 
E. Russell Perkins, '11. 

The first holder of the scholarship is Clarence Howard Carr, '24. 



22 




25 



^6miai5trative Officers 

Joseph Swain, M.S., LL.D. ------ President 

John Anthony Miller, Ph.D. - - - J'icc President 

William Albert Alexander, A.B. ----- Dean 

Edna Harriet Richards, A.M. - - - Dean of JJ^oiuen 

John Russell Hayes, A.B., LL.B. - - - - Librarian 

Harriet E. Worrell - - - Secretary to the President 

Chester Roberts - - - • - _ - - - Superintendent 
Ella Michener - _ _ Assistant to the Dean of Wouicn 

Julia R. Young, A.B. - - • - - - Secretary to the Dean 
Alice W. Swayne ------ Assistant Librarian 

-Anne C. Brierly -------- Dietitian 

Caroline Augusta Lukens, B.L. - Matron of Parrish Hall Center 
Hannah Turner Yardley - - - Matron of Wharton Hall 
Mary E. Cook ------ Director of the Laundry 

Grace E. Redheffer - - - - - _ Bookkeefer 

Lucy Annan --------- Nurse 

Alice V. Steventon -------- Nurse 

Juanita Brunenmiller - - - - Steiwgraplicr to the Dean 



26 



^oar6 of Managers 

Wilson M. Powell - - - - - - President 

Charles F. Jenkins ----- Vice President 

Hetty Lippincott Miller ----- Secretary 

Charles M. Biddle ------ Treasurer 

TERM EXPIRES TWELFTH MONTH, 1921 

Joanna Wharton Lippincott __---- Philadelphia 

Howard Cooper Johnson - , - - - - - - - Philadelphia 

Hetty Lippincott Miller ------- Riverton, N. J. 

Elsie Palmer Brown ------ Washington, D. C. 

PIenry C. Turner -------- New York 

Daniel Underhill - - - - ■• - - - Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Esther H. Cornell ------- Brooklyn, N. Y. 

TERM EXPIRES TWELFTH MONTH, 1922 

Emma McElvain Cooper ------- Camden, N. J. 

Rebecca C. Longstreth ------- Haverford 

William C. Sproul --------- Chester 

Caroline PL Worth -------- Coatesville 

Robert Pyle ---------- West Grove 

Joseph Swain --------- Swarthmore 

Edward B. Temple - - - - - - - - - Swarthmore 

TERM EXPIRES TWELFTH MONTH, 1923 

Edward Martin --------- Philadelphia 

Wilson M. Powell --------- New York 

William W. Cocks ----- Westbury, Long Island, N. Y. 

Lucy Biddle Lewis --------- Lansdowne 

Philip M. Sharples -------- West Chester 

Mary Hibbard Thatcher ------- Swarthmore 

Mary Wharton Mendelson ------ Germantown 

Isaac H. Clothier --------- Philadelphia 

TERM EXPIRES TWELFTH MONTH, 1924 

Emma C. Bancroft -------- \\'ilmingtoii 

Charles F. Jenkins -------- Philadelphia 

Harriet Cox McDowell ------ Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Abigail Foulke Pim -------- Swarthmore 

Robert H. Walker ------- Baltimore, Md. 

T. Stockton Matthews ------- Baltimore, Md. 

Mary Lippincott Griscom . - - - - - - Moorestown, N. J. 

E. Pusey Passmore --------- Philadelphia 

27 




Elizabeth Powell Bond, A.M., Dean Emeritus. 

Arthur Beardsley, C.E., Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Engineering, and 

Librarian of the Priends' Historical Library. 
William Hyde Appleton, A.B., A.M., LL.B., PiiD., Emeritus Professor of the 

Greek Language and Literature. 

George Arthur Hoadley, C.E., A.B., A.M., Sc.D., Emeritus Professor of 
Physics. 

I. DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Harold Clarke Goddard, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Ale.vander Grisivold Cummins 

Professor of English. 
Philip Marshall Hicks, A.M., Assistant Professor of English. 
Roy Petran Lingle, Litt.B., Acting Assistant Professor of English. 
Esther Elizabeth Baldwin, A.M., Instructor in English. 
Kate W. Tibbals, Ph.D.. Instructor in English. 
Priscilla Goodwyn Griffin, A.B., Instructor in English. 

II. DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH AND SPANISH 

Isabelle Bronk, Ph.B., Ph.D., Susan IV. Lippincott Professor of the French 

Language and Literature, and Secretary of the Faculty. 
Maximilien J. RuDWiN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French. 
Mercedes C. Iribas, Assistant in Spanish. 

III. DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Clara Price Newport, Ph.D., Professor of the German Language and Literature. 
Edna Harriet Richards, A. M., Instructor in Gernuni, and Dean of IVonicn. 



IV. DEPARTMENT OF GREEK AND LATIN 

Henrietta Josephine Meeteer, Ph.D., Professor of Greek and Latin. 
Ethel Hampson Brewster, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin. 

28 




V. DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

William Isaac Hull, Ph.D.. Isaac H. Clotliicr Professor of History and Inter- 
national Relations. 

VL DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Robert Clarksox Brooks. A.B., Ph.D., Joseph Wharton Professor of Political 
Science. 

VII. DEPART.fHENT OF ECONOMICS AND LAW 

Thomas Klingenberg Urdahl, Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 
Leon Henderson, A.B., Instructor in Economics. 
Claude Carroll Smith, A.B., Instructor in Lazv. 

V.II. DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY 

Jesse Herman Holmes, Ph.D.. Professor of the History of Religion and 
Philosofhy. 

IX. DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Spencer Trotter, M.D., Professor of Biology and Geology. 

Samuel Copeland Palmer, A.B., A.M.. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology 
and Geology. 

X. DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Gellert Alleman, B.S., Ph.D., Professor of Gliemistry. 

Henry Jermain Maude Creighton, B.A., M.A., M.Sc, D.Sc, Assistant 
Professor of Chemistry. 

Allen I. Myers, A.B., Instructor in Chemistry. 

XL DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING 

*George Frederick Blessing, B.M.F., M.E., Ph.D., /. V. Williamson Professor 

of Mechanical Engineering. 
Lewis Fussell, B.S., M.S., E.E,. Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical 

Engineering. 



*Absent on leave. 



29 




30 




Charles Garrett Thatcher, M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 
Rexford a. Harrower, C.E., M.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Charles Manly Howell, A.B., Instructor in Machine Design. 
William Donald Kelley, A.B., Instructor in Engineering. 

XII. DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY 

John Anthony Miller, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Edzvard H. Magill Professor of 
Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Ross Walter Marriott, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

John Himes Pitman, A.B., A.M., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Henry V. Gummere, A.M., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Margaret Elgar Powell, A.B., Assistant. 

XIII. department of physics 

WiNTHROP R. Wright, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

XIV. department of psychology and education 

Frederic Doeden, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Education. 

XV. department of food administration 

Anna P. K. Stapler, B.S., Instructor in Food Administration. 



XVI. department of physical education 

E. LeRoy Mercer, M.D., Director of Physical Education. 

Helen C. Culin, A.B., Director of Physical Education for the JVomcn. 

Elizabeth Lanning, Assistant in Physical Education for the JVonicn. 

31 




t*^fe.r#v 





FRIGID 



FOTOS 











f'^^Tj^'m 




'.: '. '■ 


mSt^ 




i 


w 







L 




«iti 




32 



The occasion of the graduation of the forty-eighth class of Swarthmore 
students was truly an inspiring event. The triumphant completion of four years 
of undergraduate life, marking the close of a decade ; the happy reunions of the 
hosts of alumni ; the successful finish of a great Endowment drive ; the completion 




MR. HOOVER SPE.\KS 



of a new building and a new laboratory; the presence of a great-hearted man 
as the Commencement speaker; the last graduation in the lives of such beloved 
friends as Isaac H. Clothier, Susan J. Cunningham and Robert AI. Janney ; — these 
will cause 192Q to be writ large in Commencement annals. 

There was a gala opening to the week of festivities in the Luncheon given on 
May thirtieth to the members of the Graduating Class by President and Mrs. 
Swain and Dean Richards. Decoration Day was truly a decoration day, for flow- 
ers adorned every nook of the Library. 

33 




34 






THE I'KESIDENT 



IlETI.EV W. IIROXK 
Tvy Oriitni- and Recipient of Ivy Medal 




WHARTdX TERRACE IX JUXE 



35 




36 



Class Day l)rouf,'ht happiness to everyone as each Senior was ])resenlefl with 
an appropriate remembrance. In the afternoon, "Monsieur i-!eaucaire" was pre- 
sented by the Senior Class, with Leon M. Pearson playinj^' the title role. 

Great hosts of jMumni, glad and gay, trailed their way back to their .'vlma 
Mater on Alumni Day. Even the pouring rain could not mar the happiness of 
those who have made Swarthmore great. The dedication of the Spencer Trotter 
Laboratory, the second presentation of the Senior Class Play, and the bigger- 
than-ever Alumni .Supper were the high-lights on the day's ])rogram. 

Doctor Henry E. Jackson's address on Baccalaureate Day was a powerful 
presentation of the needs in those two great fields, "Religion and Politics." At 
twilight that evening the Class gathered about the Library for the planting of 
the Class Ivy. Detlev W. Bronk, the Ivy Orator, emphasized the college grad- 
uate's debt to society. He appealed to each individual to heed the call of the 
Class Motto, "En Avant," and go forward to unselfishly take up responsibilities 
in ci\il and social as well as in private affairs. 

Especial splendor and dignity were rendered to the entire occasion with the 
scene of the final ceremonies in the warm sunshine of the outdoors, midst the 
great trees of the Amphitheatre. Provost Emeritus Edgar Fahs Smith, of the 
University of Pennsylvania, gave a short address, after which Mr. Herbert 
Hoover delivered the Commencement oration. Mr. Hoover was then presented 
for the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws, which was conferred by the College. 
President Swain announced the award of the Ivy Medal to Detlev W. Bronk. 
The medal bore the inscription : "For Character, Scholarship and Influence." 




37 



October Ol)lrtlcH) 

The Fifty-first Anniversan- of the founding of Swarthniore Cohege was a 
day mingled with joy and sorrow — joy over the splendid ceremonies and re- 
unions, and sorrow over the announcement of the resignation of our beloved 
President, Doctor Joseph Swain. 

The academic procession surpassed that of former years in appearance and 
in completeness. Led by President Swain and Dr. Francis Blair, the faculty 
marched in their handsome robes representing their years of labor. Then marched 
the undergraduates, more grand'ose than ever before — the state!)- seniors in caps 
and gowns, the Beau Brummel junior men in white trousers and blue coats, the 




UR. BLAIH, Dli. MILLER. MR. I'OWELL. 
AND TRESIDENT SWAIN ' 



garnet-sweatered sophomores, and the orange-bedecked freshmen. Swarth- 
moreans-to-be, extending from next year's freshman class to a baby in arms 
carrying a 1943 banner, completed the procession. The click of cameras and 
the turning of moving-picture cranks gave evidence of the fact that this drama 
was being acted on a world stage. 

The event was commemorated by the planting of a tree by a group of 
freshmen, just below the Sproul Observatory. In turn the classes sang their 
songs, and the camera men took advantage of the opportunity to take pictures 
of "Prexy." One enterprising photographer staged a "farewell scene," in which 
President Swain was represented as shaking the final good-bye to a group 
of co-eds. 

The next scene was in Collection Hall. President-elect Wilson M. Powell, 
of the Board of Managers, presided. Dr. Francis Grant Blair, '97, Superin- 

38 



teiident of Puljlic Inslruction of ihe State of Illinois, gave a jjowerful address, 
making a plea for educational systems which teach men and women to cope 
mentally, morally, physically, and socially with the problems of life. 




FLTUKE SWARTHMORKANS 



Almost with tears in his eyes, and yet with that firm courage which has 
always characterized his life. President Swain rose and read the announcement 
of his resignation. President Powell accepted the resignation in the name of 




FOUNDERS' DAY GAME Wri'H FR.\NKLIN 
AND MARSHALL 



the Board of Managers, and paid a glowing tribute to the work of President 
Swain. The singing of Alma Mater closed the exercises. 



O^e 4^resi6ent's tJ^esignatiott Message 

"To the Friends of Sivarthiuore College: 

"I became President of Swarthmore nineteen years ago. At 
that time we formulated a program for the upbuilding of the College 
that was to occupy a period of twenty years. This program has 
been carried out loyally by the many friends of the College. 

"I am convinced that a new program should now be formulated 
with a younger man as our leader. I have, therefore, placed my 
resignation in the hands of the Board of Managers, to take ei¥ect 
Sixth Month 30th, 1921. 

"In these years I have formed ties with friends working for a 
common cause which can never be broken. I want to express my 
very deep appreciation of the splendid co-operation of those who 
have helped to place the College in a high position among sister 
institutions and to bespeak for my successor, when the right man 
is found, the continuance of the cordial support necessary, in the 
realization of our hopes and desires, for a still greater Swarthmore." 



40 



Acceptance bj ^r. 4^oweU 

"This announcement of President Swain's is one of those events 
which of necessity must occur in college work. 

"The President came here nineteen years ago with the desire, ambi- 
tion, and purpose to make Swarthmore the most important of the Eastern 
co-educational colleges not supported by any state. He has succeeded to 
a degree which even his imagination could not have foreseen. Of strong 
physique and powerful mental qualities, he has given his best, never 
saving himself mentally or physically. He has never avoided any difficult 
task. He solved successfully Swarthmore's part in the great war. His 
effort, his unrestrained giving of himself have drawn on him heavily. 

"Starting with the College on a well-laid foundation, he has built 
a successful superstructure. With an endowment of $360,000 when he 
came, he now resigns with an endowment of $2,225,000. In the mean- 
time the plant has been increased in almost the same proportions. The 
enrollment of undergraduates has grown from two hundred to five hun- 
dred. The educational standard has steadily advanced. 

"His strong personality has drawn to him the love and gratitude of 
the undergraduates, the co-operation and appreciation of the graduates, 
the confidence and respect of the Board. He has taught many the 
pleasure of unselfish giving. 

"His resignation, though necessary and imperative for his health, 
brings on a crisis which graduates, undergraduates and the Board must 
stand together and meet. We of the Board want and need and must 
have your earnest support and co-operation in this crisis. 

"May God protect the President." 



41 




43 




44 




45 




46 




WII-LIAM P. KEMP 




11 \ II, COLLINS 



Senior (L\ass Officers 



First Semester 

William P. Kemp 



Second Senwster 

Leon H. Collins 



President 

John W. Dudley Vice President Edward E. Bartleson 

Grace T. Wilson - - Secretary - - - - Elsie Fisher 

William R. Huey - Treasurer - - William M. Harvey 






GRACE WILSON 



ELSIE FISHER 



47 



yiX'2 lKing6om 



Down by the shining water well 
I found a very little dell. 

No higher than my head. 
The heather and the gorse about 
In summer bloom were coming out, 

Some yellow and some red. 

I called the little pool a sea : 
The little hills were big to me ; 

For I am very small. 
I made a boat. I made a town, 
I searched the caverns up and down, 

And named them one and all. 

And all about was mine, I said. 
The little sparrows overhead, 

The little minnows too. 
This was the world and I was king, 
For me the birds came by to sing. 

For me the swallows flew. 

I played there were no deeper seas. 
Nor any wider plains than these, 

Nor other kings than me. 
At last I heard my mother call 
Out from my house at evenfall. 

To call me home to tea. 

And I must rise and leave my dell. 
And leave my dimpled water well. 

And leave my heather blooms. 
Alas ; and as my home I neared. 
Flow very big my nurse appeared. 

How great and cool the rooms. 

• — Stevenson. 



48 




5EM0R5 




Edwin Russell Albertson, AX, Hillsdale, N. J. _ 

Ch'il Engineering 

»_v^-t K -"^ *'"'*-''■'''"'''- "Loss of ivcalth is loss of dirt; 

^ .^ , - •}_»- rhe hahpv man's ivithoul a shirt' 

Prepared at Pennington Seminary, Pennington, 
N. J.; Entered from Cornell University (II). 



..VJ^, 



'. lU^n^ 



Elizabeth Middleton Atherholt, K K r, West 

Chester _ _ _ - _ Matiiciiiatics 

"She can talk the face off a clock" 
Prepared at Girls' High School, Philadelphia ; 
Hockey (I-II-III-IV) ; 'Varsity Gym ( I-II-III- 
IV); Secretary Girls' A. A. (II); Advertising 
Manager of Phoenix (II) ; Secretary of Somer- 
ville (II) ; Glee Club (I-II) ; Chairman Red Cross 
Campaign (III-IV) ; Halcyon Stalif (III). 




Frank Edward Atkins, Jr., A Y, Merchantville, N. J. 

"Remove not the ancient landmark 



Mechanical Enginccrina 



Prepared at Merchantville High School and Camden Manual Training High 
School; Soccer (II-III); Track Squad (I-II-III-IV); Engineers' Club. 




Elizabeth Fredrikke Barth, Philadelphia Biology 

"Front the crown of her head to the 
sole of her foot, she is all mirth" 

Prepared at West Philadelphia High School for 
Girls ; Women's Student Executive Committee 
(III); Somerville Committee (II-III); Glee Club 
(I-III-IV), President (IV) ; Table Committee 
(III-IV) ; Fire Captain (IV) ; Campus Club (I\'). 



Edward Evans Bartleson, <J> 2 K, Chester 

Mecliauical Engineering 
"This side of Paradise, there's little ttleasure for the ivise" 

Prepared at Chester High School ; Engineers' Club, 
Secretary (III), President (IV) ; Permanent Class 
Vice President ; Sigma Tau. 



THAT HABITUAL 
WISE LOOK 



49 








BROTHERS 




S'MATTER POP? 




BATTT GIVES US 
ANHU'HEE JOLT 




rm a =-=-= ^ 



( fc I t^p» 




MEPHISTOrilEI.E; 




I.E PEXSETR 



\4 






k 



rffflf- 




5M0R5 




Anna Jemima BEyvrTV, IT B *, Chester - Latin 

"Off site comes and oft' she goes" 

Prepared at Chester High School ; Class Hockey 
Team (I) ; Somerville (IV). 



Grant Emerson Benjamin, * K "t, Philadelphia 

Political Science 

"IVIiy tlien, the zvoiid's mine oyster 
JVhich I witli sword will often" 

Prepared at Swarthmore High School ; Basketball 
(I-II-UI-IV) : Lacrosse (H-HI-IV), Captain 
(IV) ; "S" Club; Devils. 




.SIR LAUXCEI.OT 




Dorothy Sellers Blackburn^ Lock Haven English 
"Bom for success she seemed" 
Prepared at Lock Haven High School ; Class Bas- 
ketball (III) ; Circulation Manager of Phoenix 
(IV; : Vice President of Y. W. C. A. (Ill) ; Glee 
Club (II-III-IV); Somerville. 

William Morse Blaisdell, * a 0, Slippery Rock 

Political Science 
"My library is dukedom large enough" 
Entered from Penn State (III) ; Phoenix (III-IV), 
Local Editor (III), Associate Editor (IV) ; Glee 
Club (III-IV). 



James Furnas Bogardus, K 2, Swarthmore - - - Political Science 
"Had J been present at tlie creation, I would have given some lielpfnl 
hints for tlie better ordering of the universe" 

Prepared at George School; Soccer (I-III), Captain (III) ; Track ^lanager 
(IV) ; Debate Board (I-II-III-IV), President (IV) ; Advertising Manager 
Phoenix (III), Business Manager (II-IV) ; Winner Extemporaneous Speak- 
ing Contest (I) ; Winner Potter Prize Debate (IV) ; Varsity Debate (I-II- 
III-IV), Captain (II-III-IV) ; Secretary Pennsyhania Oratorical Union 
(III) ; Class President (1-2) ; Founders'' Day Play (IV) ; Vice President 
I. N. A. (IV). 



51 




SENIORS 




Mathematics 



BovD Janney Brown, $ K *, Washington, D. C. 

"How use doth breed a habit i)i a iiuiii" 
Prepared at Washington Friends' School; Tennis Team ( I-II-III-IV), 'i\'Ian 
ager (III-IV) ; Scrub Football (I) ; Scrub Basketball (I-II-IV) : Hamburg 
Show (III-IV) ; Cheer Leader (III-IV) ; Business Manager 1921 Halcyon; 
Phoenix Advisory Board (I-II-III-IV), President (IV). 



•Ui* 



Franklin Preston Buckman, $ A ©, Trenton. N. J. 

Political Science 
"A close iiioiith catches no tlies" 
Prepared at Trenton High School ; 'Varsity La- 
crosse (I-II) ; 'Varsity Soccer (I-III-IV); Class 
Football (I-II) ; Devils; Kwink. 





LEARNING A TEADB 



George Leslie Burnett, Philadelphia - Econotiiics 
"A soft carpet knight, all scenting niusl; and amber" 
17 ' Prepared at Northeast High School ; Manager Swim- 
1 ming Team (III) ; Athletic Council (III) ; Engi- 

neers' Club; Glee Chih (I); Classical Club. 

Eleanor Albino Butler, * M, Narberth - English 
"I care not a stravo" 
Prepared at Lower Merion High School ; Somerville 
(III-IV) ; Glee Club (IV). 



William Porter Carter, K 2, Philadelphia - - - - Economics 
"Thou little thin/cest wliat a little foolery governs the zvhole zvorld" 
Prepared at Northeast High School; Baseball (I-II-III-IV), Captain (III- 
IV) ; Football (TII-III-IV); Soccer (II-III-IV) ; Glee Club (III-IV); 
Junior Play (III) ; President A. A. (IV) ; Devils; "S" Club; Book and Key. 



52 




SENIORS 




George Whitman Casey, Jr., Swarthmore - - - - Mathematics 

"He liad a face like a hlessiiig" 
Prepared at Swarthmore lligh School; Junior Play (III); Hamburg Show 
(IV). 

Alfred Cmkistensen, A Y, Philadelphia - - - Mechanical Eugincerincj 
"He's tough, iiiadain: lough and dcvilisli sly" 
Prepared at Northeast Pligh School; Scrub Lacrosse (III-IV) ; Devils; 
College Billiard Champion ( IV) ; Runner-up in Bridge Tournament (IV). 



LoRNA Beatrice Christie, a r, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Englisli 

"She looketh as butter would not melt iu her mouth" 

Prepared at New Brunswick High School ; Local 
Editor of Phoenix (II-III); Secretary English 
Club (IV); Somerville; I. C. S. A.; Founders' 
Day Play (IV) ; English Club Play (III-IV) : 
Little Theater Club. 




James Dawson Clancev, K 2, Merchantville, N. J. - - - Chemistry 

"I am but a stranger here, 
Heaven is my home" 

Entered from Delaware College (II) ; Baseball (II-III-IV) ; Basketball (II- 
III) ; Football (II-III-IV) ; Devils; "S" Club. 

Janet Clark^ A r, Media - - - - -- - - Biology 

"You never ean tell" 
Prepared at Friends' Central School; Class Hockey (I-III), Captain (I); 
Class Basketball (III); 'Varsity Hockey (IV); Treasurer Y. W. C. A. 

(III) ; Student Affairs Committee (IV) ; Glee Club (II) ; President Girls' 
A. A. (IV) ; Somerville. 

Virginia Laws Coleman, X O, Swarthmore _ - - - Frcucli 

"O, hozii full of briars is this working day world" 
Prepared at Mary Lyon School; Class Hockey (II-III); 'Varsitv Hockey 

(IV) ; Glee Club; Somerville; Cercle Francais. 



53 




5EM0R5 




Charles Benjamin Coles, ay, Aloorestown, N. J. 

Economics 

(Pb »-^— ^ — ^ ■■/ /„// ;,(,(-/, claz::Ied at bch'lding myself all rosy red, 
jy-riJljf^^^^-J.''^ l'^i-4- At ha'L'iiig. I myself, caused the sun to rise" 

Prepared at Moorestown Friends' High Scliool ; Sor- 
cer (I-III-IV): Lacrosse (III-IV); Scrub Basket- 
ball (I-II) : Scrub Baseball (I) ; Devils. 



Ci-iAULESANNA Benajah A. CoLES. Moorestown, X. J. 

Chemistry 
".Icy rises in me. lilce a summers mum" 

Prepared at Moorestown Friends' Fligh .School ; 
Class Hockey (FH-HI-IV) ; 'Varsity Hocke)- (HI) : 
Somerville. 




Vi* 



V 







Leon FIoward Collins, Jr., <t> K *, Merchant\'ille, N. J. 

"An hcnesi man, close buttoned to the cliin, 
Broadcloth witliout, and a zvarm heart leitliin" 



Biology 



Prepared at Moorestown Friends' High School : Scrub Football ( LULIV) ; 
Soccer (1): Scrub Baseball (Ln-HL); 'Varsity Debate (H-IV); Class 
Vice President {111-2): Permanent Class President; 1921 Halcyon Staff; 
Glee Club ( I ) ; Little Theater Club ; Cercle Francais. 



Richard Arment Darlington, 4> A ©, Chadds Ford - - - Clicmistry 
"The still hogge eatelh up all the dratfe" 
Prepared at Friends' Central School; Soccer Alanager (I\'j; ^\'inner of 



Du Pont Scholarshii) (IH; 



David Mathias Dennison, Swarthmore - - - - Mathematics 

"I'he mind's the standard of the man" 

Prepared at Swarthmore High School; Mathematics Club, President (IV); 
Phi Beta Kappa. 



Si 




■ya ■ -^ ■ J 

-BB" ' ' ' '-■■I *■' ^* ^ 




SENIORS 




Marion Estelle Deputy, $ M, Glenolden - - - _ 

"Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace" 
Prepared at Swarthmore High School ; Somerville. 



English 



Clara Knerr Dewees, Phoenixville ----- Mathematics 
"There is no other royal path which leads to Geometry" 
Prepared at West Chester Normal School ; Mathematics Club, Secretary- 
Treasurer (III) ; Somerville. 

Walter Haines Dickinson, *K*, Montclair, N. J. Mechanical Engineering 
"This ivorld is no place for a minister's son" 
'Xi 1aJuI\^ Prepared at Swarthmore Preparatory School; Class Basketball (I-H); 

^y Freshman Tennis Team ; Engineers' Club ; Classical Club ; Manager Musical 

----- Latin 



yyuiAA^jLui 







Clubs (HI) ; Varsity Tennis (IV). 



Marv Dotterer, X n, Wayne ------- 

"I'm forever hlozving bubbles" 
Prepared at Radnor Pligh School ; Somerville ; Glee Club ; Classical Club : 
Cercle Francais. 

John Woolman Dudley, * 2 K, Washington, D. C. - - - Economics 

"More knave than fool" 
Prepared at Washington Central High School; Tennis (I-II-III-IV), Cap- 
tain (II-III-IV) ; Glee Club (I-III-IV) ; Instrumental Club (III-IV) ; Class 
Vice President (IV-1) ; Cheerleader (IV). 






Hannah Tomlinson Eavenson, Masonville, N. J. 



(U>JXAA^- 




Biology 

"Ah, make the most of ivhat we yet may spend. 
Before zve too into the Dust descend" 

Prepared at Friends' Central School ; Class Basket- 
ball (I-II-III) ; 'Varsity Basketbah (III); Class 
Hockey (I-II-III), Captain (II) ; 'Varsity Hockey 
(II-III) ; Somerville. 



Wavland Hovt Elsbree, * a ®, Preston Hollow, 

N. Y. - - - - Political Science 

"At least zi'e'll die with harness on our backs" 

Prepared at Middleburg High School, Middleburg, 
N. Y. ; Scrub Soccer ( III) ; Y. M. C. A., Secretary- 
Treasurer (III), President (IV); 'Varsity Debate 
(III-IV) ; Baseball Manager (IV) ; Men's Execu- 
tive Committee ( I V ) ; Kwink ; Delta Sigma Rho ; 
Book and Key. 




56 




SENIORS 




Makgaret Wilson Emberv, X n, Philadelphia 

Political Science 
"Black-eyed Susan" 

Prepared at Philadelphia Pligh School for Girls ; 
Student Conduct Committee (IV) ; Student Aiifairs 
Committee (IV); Somerville ; Glee Club; Class 
Hockey (IV). 

Edith. Anna Evans, K A ®, Indianapolis, Ind. English 

"She looketh well tn the ways of her household 
And eateth not the bread of idleness" 

Entered from Earlham College (III) ; Somerville. 





Henry Turner Evans, $ K *, Manhasset, N. Y. 

Mechanical Engineering 
"Why is this thus.' What is the reason of this thusness?" 
Prepared at Swarthmore Preparatory School; 
Track Squad (I-II-IIIj ; Devils. 

Elizabeth Agnes Fisher, A r, Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Biology 
"She never found fault zvith yon, never iniflied 
your wrong by her right" 

Prepared at Glen Ridge High School ; Attended 
New York University (II) ; Class Hockey (IV); 
Class Basketball (II-III) ; Class Gym (III) ; Glee 
Club (II-III-IV) ; Permanent Class Secretary; 
Campus Club ; Somerville. 



CHESHIRE CAT 



Eleanor Wickersham Green, X n. Fox Chase 

Biology 
"The Siren Lady" 

Prepared at Philadelphia Girls' High School and 
Friends' Central School; Class Basketball (I-II- 
III) ; Class Hockey (I-II-III) ; 'Varsity Basket- 
ball (III) ; Secretary of Somerville (III). 




THE SIREN STARTS 



57; 





SENIORS 




Biology 



Helen L^"DIA Gf(js|:om, KKT, Salem, N. J. 

"A careless song, ivilli a Utile iioiiseiisc in if, 
»<Ti' and then docs not inisbecoinc a luonarch" 

Prepared at Salem High School; Class Hockey (I-H-in- 
IV), Captain ( HI) ; 'Varsity Hockey (HI-IV) ; Gym Team 
(T-H-ni) ; Athletic Council (III) ; Phoenix Advisory 
Board (IV) ; 1921 Halcyon Staff; Women's Student Gov- 
ernment, Secretary (III), President (IV) ; Class Secretary 
(III-l) ; Delegate to Y. W. C. A. Conference (III) ; Dele- 
gate to Student Government Conference (IV); Editor 
W. S. G. A. Handbook (HI) ; Classical Club. 



Norman Bird Grobert, $ S K, East Orange, 

N. J. - - - - Economics 

'7 can't sing. As a siugisi I am not a success. 
I am saddest when I sing. So are those wlm 
hear me. They are sadder even than I am" 

Prepared at East Orange High School ; 

Glee Club (I-III-IV) ; College Bridge 

Champion (IV) ; Kwink. 



■HhW^^ 4^>H 


mm 


••r.Air- 


%'^''' 


■■IWi 




Biology 



Emily Elizabeth Hallauer, * M, Cynwyd 

"Good-bye, proud world! I'm going home; 
Thou art not my friend; I am not thine" 
Prepared at William Penn High School, Philadelphia ; 
Class Hockey (I); 1921 Halcyon Staff; Y. W^ C. A., 
Treasurer (II), President (IV) ; Student Affairs Com- 
mittee (HI-IV); Somerville Play (II); Delegate to 
Y. W. C. A. Conference (III-IV) ; Delegate to Des 
Moines Conference (IV); Glee Club; Somerville; 
Mortar Board. 

Dorothy McClellan Hammond, West Chester English 
".I still, small voice" 
Prepared at \\'est Chester High School ; Somerville. 

William Minton Harvey, AY, Chester . - - - Economics 

■■Hanging and u-iving goes by destiny" ^••\_sy^^MjuuK ^ i*vCu«-'to /^ {1»A. 
Prepared at Chester High School; Scrub Football (I-II) ; Lacrosse (I-II) ; 
Manager of Basketball; Stage Manager Junior Play; Devils; "S" Club; 
Kwink ; Book and Key. 



58 



llS ! i;i?JHSam ! g a MiigM i!' ^ 




ALONG 







59 




SENIORS 




HiLDEGARDE Marie Hexamer, A V. Philadelphia History 

"Let's do it after tljc liigti-lnmdcd Roman fasliioii" 

Prepared at Friends' Central School ; Student Conduct 
Committee (III): Student Affairs Committee (IV): 
Table Committee (II-III-IV), Chairman (IV) : Chair- 
man Entertainment Committee ( IV ) : Eligible for 
Lucretia Mott Fellowship : Cast of Mrs. Bumpstead- 
Leigh (III): Founders' Day Play (IV); Little 
Theater Club. 



Ella Roberts Hoyt, Camden, N. J. 

"Learning is but adjunct to myself" 



French 



Prepared at Friends' Central School : Somerville : 
Cercle Francais. 




THE rr.TTOCRAT 



ZJ^n^ 



William Ronald Huey, A Y, Kennett Square - - - - Clicinistry 

"Heaven's help is better tlian early rising" 

Prepared at Kennett Square Fligh School: Track Squad (I) : Class Treas- 
urer (IV-1). 



Halbert Conrow Hutchinson, Plainfield, N. J. 



Electrical Engineering 



"I am Sir Oracle, and zdien I cpc my lips 
Let no dog hark" 

Prepared at North Plainfield Fligh School ; Mathematics Club : Engineers' 
Club. 



William Yates Irwin, Jr., <I> K *, Norwood 

"There's but the twinkling of a star 
Between a man of peace and zvar" 



Chemical Engineering 



Prepared at Chester High School: Scrub Football (I-III) ; Track Squad 
(I-III) : Glee Club (I-II) ; Soph Show, "Captain Jinks"; English Club 
Play (III). 



60 




SENIORS 




George Bement Jackson, AY, Brooklyn, N. Y. - - Chemical Engincerhuj 

"Oil, ivho can tell, save he whose heart hath Iried" 

Prepared at Brooklyn Friends' School; Lacrosse (III-IV) ; Swimming (II) ; 
Vice President Engineers' Club (III). 

Miriam Atkinson Jenkins, K A ®, Swarthmore . _ _ English 

"N'o scandal about. Queen Elbabeth, I hope" 

Prepared at Swarthmore High School ; Manager of Women's News of 
Phoenix (IV) ; Associate Editor of 1921 Halcyon; Corresponding Secretary 
of Somerville ; Glee Club ( III) ; Classical Club ; English Club : Mortar Board. 



Edwin Morris Joseph, Cleveland, Ohio - - - - Political Science 

"An honest man is one of the fetv great zvorks that can be seen for nothing" 

Prepared at East High School, Cleveland ; La- 
crosse (II-Ill-IV); Football (IV); "S" Club, 
Executive Committee (III), Corresponding Sec- 
retary (IV) ; Treasurer A. A. (IV) ; Class Vice 
President (IH-l) ; Class President (III-2) ; 1921 
Halcyon Staff; Stage Manager Junior Show 
(III) ; Devils. 

Ethel Johanna Kaplan, X n, Germantown 

Political Science 

"Let the world slide, let the ivorld go; 
A fig for care and a fig for zvoe" 

Prepared at Germantown Friends' School ; Class 
Hockey (I-II-III-IV) ; 'Varsity Hockey (II-III- 
IV), Captain (IV) ; Glee Club; Somerville; Lit- 
tle Theater Club. 




Howard Bleasdale Katzenbach, K 2, Philadelphia - - Economics 
AyU.AJ^*.^^^''^ "Potience, — and shuMe the cards" 

i yW Prepared at Northeast High School; Baseball (I); Lacrosse (III-IV); 



XlAyUit^^ 



^>~ 



Soccer (III-IV) ; Junior Play (III) ; Devils; "S" Club. 



61 




WATTING FOR PARD THURSDAY NIGHT 




TinOARETTE? 




tQ 




,, 



»?'-JT::i^ _'■ 




''^ 







NUFP SED 



HELLO, ED! 



k 





SENIORS 




Edith Eleanor Keene, Lansdowne - _ - . 
"For my l>ai't, gelling up is iiol so easy" 
Prepared at Lansdowne High School. 



History 



William Powell Kemp, *K*, Easton, Md. - - - Political Science . ^ 

"Yc'll nolc I've liltic lime for social repartee" ^^a-'-^--'->-'-<-c< — ^^^ CM-A-i-oj^i^ ^ 
Prepared at George School; Football (IV); Basketball Squad (I-II-IH), 
'Varsity (IV); Track (I-II-III-IV), Captain (IV); Class Vice President 
(II-l) ; Class President (IV-1) ; Vice President Debate Board (IV) ; Debate 
(III) ; Delta Sigma Rho ; Book and Key. 



vv-ei>o^jjuL. 



Dorothy Armstrong Kinsley, n B $, Philadelphia English 

"She's pretty to walk ivith, 
^SLo^*^-^ — A]id ivitly to talk ivilh, 

And pleasant, too. to think on" 
^'^'^-^^^ ^ Prepared at West Philadelphia High School for Girls; 1921 
Halcyon Staff; Class Secretary (II-l) ; Glee Club (IV) ; 
Somerville. 

Marjorie Estelle Kistler, K K r, Wilkes-Barre Biology 

"A pard-like spirit, beautiful and szvifl" 
Prepared at Wilkes-Barre High School; Basketball (II-III- 
IV), Captain (III-IV) ; Class Basketball Captain (II-III- 
IV) ; W. S. G. A. Executive Committee (HI) ; Class Sec- 
retary (III-2) ; Glee Club. 





John William Klopp_, Philadelphia - - Biology 

"Straight is the gate and narroii' is the way 
that leadeth into Phi Beta Kappa" 

Prepared at Northeast High School ; Classical Club ; 
Mathematics Club; Campus Club, President (IV); 
Phi Beta Kappa. 



Elizabeth Knabe, Philadelphia - - Chcinisfry 

"She knezv tvhat is 'culiat" 

Prepared at Philadelphia High School for Girls ; Class 
Hockey (MI); Class Gym (I-II); Glee Club (II- 
III) ; Treasurer I. C. S. A. (II-III-IV) ; Somerville. 



TCc-tW^ A«i^y-c<:^ 



63 




SENIORS 





Helen Cooper Knight, a r. Philadelphia 

"She was as good as she ivas fair" 



French 



Prepared at Friends' Select School, Philadelphia ; 
Glee Club (I-II-III-IV) ; President Cercle Francais 
(IV) ;. Somerville Play (IV) ; Junior Play (III) ; 
May Day Maid of Honor (I) ; Somerville Com- 
mittee (III-IV). 



George Henry Kolb, K 2, Philadelphia Economics 
"An ill weed grows apace" 
Prepared at Northeast High School; Track (III- 
IV) ; Football Manager (IV) ; Junior Play (III) ; 
Secretary "S" Club (IV) ; Devils; Kwink. 



Sarah Elizabeth Kreemer, West Chester 

"Whose little body lodged a miglity mind" 
Prepared at West Chester High School : Somerville. 



French 






Charles Plummer Larkin, $ 2 K, Chester 



[M^ 



Economics 

"He conquers a second lime, zvho controls 
himself in Z'ictory" 

Prepared at Chester High School ; Foot- 
ball (I-II-III-IV), Captain (III-IV); 
Basketball (I-II-III-IV) ; Baseball (I-II- 
III-IV) ; Class President (I-l) ; Student 
Government Executive Committee (III- 
IV) ; "S" Club; Devils; Book and Key. 




64 




SENIORS 



Arthur Thacher Lukens, A 2 $, Plymouth Meeting 

Electrical Engineering 

"It is a pleasure to jest opi'orliinely" 

Prepared at Friends' Central School ; Soph Show 
(II) ; Musical Clubs (II-III-IV) ; Engineers' Club; 
Kwink. 



Charles Wildey Lukens. ^ 2 K, Moore 

Cii'il Engineering 
"A lianiiless thunderbolt" 
Prepared at Chester Pligh School ; Engineers' Club. 





HIS FIRST I'ACK THI.f YEAR 
RECOGNIZE GRIZZLY? 



TowNSEND Sherman McAllister. 
\ Y, Denver, Colo. '>'* 

Electrical Engineering 
"An eagle does not catch Hies" 
Prepared at Hackley School, Den- 
ver ; Scrub Football fl-IV) ; 
Swimming (I-II-III-IV) ; La- 
crosse Manager (IV); Class 
Treasurer (1-2) ; 1921 Halcyon 
Staff ; Engineers' Club ; Kwink. 



Frank Krick Machemer, K 2, Royersford - - Electrical Engineering 

"A very gentle beast, and of a good conscience" 

Prepared at Royersford High School; Scrub Soccer (III) ; Scrub Lacrosse 
(III-IV) ; Engineers' Club. 



Albert Conard Mammel, $A0, North Wales 



Electrical Engineering 



"They arc fools who kiss and tell 

Wisely lias the poet sung; 
Man may hold all sorts of posts 
If he'll only hold his tongue" 

Prepared at North Wales High School; Lacrosse (III-IV); Engineers' 
Club. 



65 




SENIORS 









Charles Singleton Mears, K5, Roxborough - Chemistry 

"And railed on Lady Fortune in good terms, in good set terms" 

Freshman Tennis Team; Baseball Scrubs (I-II-III) ; Busi- 
ness Manager Y. M. C. A. Handbook (III) ; Advertising 
Manager 1921 Halcyon; Class Treasurer (II-2) ; Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet (IV) ; Devils; Kwink. 



Frances Katharine Miller, n B $, Philadelpliia History 

"As merry as tlie day is long" 

Prepared at Friends' Select School; Class Hockev (I-II- 
III); Class Basketball (I-II-III); Basketball Manager 
(IV) ; Vice President Girls' A. A. (Ill) ; Circulation Man- 
ager 1921 Halcyon; Class Secretary (I-l) ; Y. W. C. A. 
Ca1)inet (IV); Somerville Play (II-III) ; Mortar Board. 

Grace Edna Moore, Philadelphia - _ _ English 

"Brevity is the soul of wit" 
Prepared at Philadelphia High School for (jirls ; Somerville. 



Donald Swain Morgan, <I>K*, Knightstown, 
Ind. - - Mechanical Engineering 

"7 he man from home" 
Prepared at Knightstown High School and 
Swarthmore High School ; Phoenix, Local 
Editor (III), A^ssociate Editor (IV); 1921 
Halcyon Staff; Musical Clubs (III), Man- 
ager (IV) ; Chief Marshall Founders' Day 
(IV) ; Engineers' Club. 

Carlisle Morse, Princeton, Kentucky 

Mathematics 
"It is not fiermitted to knozo everything" 
Entered from Western Kentucky State Nor- 
mal School ; Mathematics Club. 




GIDDAr, NAPOLEON! 



66 




PLAY BRIDGE? 



SENIORS 




William Staunton Mf)\XAN, * 2 K, Swarthniore wjMv>v**iL . , ' 

hcoiioniics -^ ^^ ? 

" '7'/,( sn much to be king, that he only is so by being so" 

Prepared at Swarthmore High School ; Scrub Lacrosse 
(I-II-III) ; Junior Play (III) : Class Treasurer (II-2). 



7 



Mabel Gladys Newton. 'I'M, Lake Ronkonkoma, N. Y. /?o^ ^^-xA 

Eiif/Iish 

"The best porlioi} of a good man's life 
His Utile, noir.eless iinremembcred aets" 

Prepared at Erasmus Hall High School, New York; 
Glee Club (HLIV) : Somerville; English Club. 



Paula Pagelow,, Media ._.----- English 

"Second tlwnglits arc ever ■Z'^'iser" 
Prepared at Lakewood High School: 'Varsity Swimming: Glee Club. 



Eleanor Mary Paxson, Swarthmore 

"Absent in body but [ircseni in spirit" 
Prepared at Swarthmore High School : Somerville. 



Biology iJ 



George William Place, K 2, Swarthmore - - Mechanical Engineering 

Prepared at Swarthmore Pligh School and Swarthmore Preparatory School ; 
Basketball (I-H-HLIV) ; Baseball (HI). 



George Alfred Powell. K 2, Glen Head, N. Y. 



Electrical Engineering 



"A smile ivoiild spoil his frui^'ning eonntcnanee" 
Scrub Baseball (LH-HI) : Engineering Club. 



VTa.( 




67 



~y) 




LITTLE MISS SPRINGTIME 




CHUTOBACCO? 




THE NEW WOMAN 




NOTHING PCNNT 
'BOUT THAT 




DON'T CRY, LITTLE GIRL 



II 







SENIORS 




Joseph Janvier Pugh, K 2, Lansdowne _ - . Political Science 

"What's the earth 
Catnfared with love, found, gained, and kept?" 

Scrub Football (I-III-IV); Scrub Baseball (I-II-III); Lacrosse (III) 

Associate Editor 1921 Halc3'on ; "S" Club. 



Lucy Avres Rainier, X n, Cedarxille, N.J. 

"Care to our cofUn adds a nail, no doubt; 
And every grin so merry draivs one out" 



Frcncli 



Prepared at Bridgeton High School ; Somerville Librarian ( III) ; L C. S. A. 
Secretary (HI), President (IV) ; Classical Club; Cercle Francais. 



Catherine Ott Rhoads, Lansdowne ------ 

"On their owti merits modest men are dumb" 
Prepared at Lansdowne High School; Class Hockey (I-II-III-IV). 



History 



Helen Ethel Samuel, $ M, South Orange, N.J. - - - English 
"Let us eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow — " 
Prepared at Swarthmore High School; Class Basketball (I) ; Class Hockey 
(I-II-III-IV); 'Varsity Hockey (III-IV); Somerville Play (III); Glee 
Club (III). 



7kA^ 



Elizabeth Norbury Schellinger 
Mary Norbury Schellinger 
-^ Creek, '^ J. 



n B $, Green 
Latin 



uch ean be /aid on both sides" 
Entered from Dickinson College (HI) ; Somer- 
ville ; Glee Club ; Classical Club. 

Thomas Albert Short, n K A, Drexel Hill 

Electrical Engineering 
"He plays tlie eliess of social intercourse" 
Prepared at Merchantville High School ; Glee 
Club ; Engineers' Club. 




^«;««»' -j»-. >• 



69 




SENIORS 




Charlotte Price Speakman, K K r. Mount Vernon, N. Y. - English 

"And she knew by heart, from finish to start, the Boot; of Iniquity" 
Prepared at Brantwood Hall; Class Hockey (I-H-HI) ; Class Gym (I-H) ; 
Student Conduct Committee (IV) ; Glee Club (I-H) ; Flower Girl in Alay 
Dances (H) ; Somerville. 

Marie Julia Stettler, Slatington ------ Latin 

"I am the I'cry pinie of courtesy" 
Prepared at Slatington High School; Glee Qub (HI) ; Secretary of Classical 
Club (IV) ; Somerville. 



Mildred Carmany Stout, A r, Philadelphia - English 

■^ . i» ..- " "Oh, zi'histle, and I'll come to ye, my lad" 

Prepared at Philadelphia High School for Girls ; 
Class Gym (I-II) ; Mathematics Club; Somerville. 

William PIinchman Stow, Jr., K 2, Moorestown, N. J. 
^,_j.,Jiji_jK Mathematics 

-r\ \^ i (_ S>'^-'-vJT' "Idleness is an appendix to nobility" 

Prepared at Camden High School and Swarthmore 
Preparatory School; Football (I-II-III-IV) ; Bas- 
ketball (I-II-III-IV), Captain (IV) ; Class Treas- 
urer (I-l); Class President (1-2); Treasurer "S" 
Club (III-2), Vice President (IV-1) ; Kwink ; Book 
and Key. 





Claire Kathleen Strawn, Bethlehem Mathematics 

"The bashful z'irgin's sidelong looks of love" 

Prepared at Bridgeport High School ; Class 
Hockey (II-III-IV) ; Vice President of W. S. G. 
A. (Ill) ; Student Affairs Committee (IV) ; Sec- 
retary-Treasurer of Somerville (III); Delegate 
to Student Government Contention (III) ; Glee 
Club; Classical Club; Alortar Board. 



70 




SENIORS 




Evelyn Martha Strawn, Bethlehem 

Mathematics 
"Hang sorrozv! Carc'll kill a cat" 
Prepared at Bridgeport High School ; Class 
Hockey (IV) ; Treasurer of Somerville 
(HI) ; Glee Club (II-HI-IV) ; Mathematics 
Club. 

Harold Theodore Stltbbs, Oxford Biology 

"Oil, this Icaniiiig — zvltat a tiling it is" 
Prepared at Oxford High School ; Glee Club 
(II-IV). 




SEE THIS, DOC? 



loNA Genevieve Sutch, X fi, Philadelphia . . _ _ French 

"I'm certain care's an enemy to life" 
Pi'epared at Germantown High School ; Somerville ; Cercle Francais. 

Alfred George Taylor, Upland ------ Chemistry 

"Give vie a racket, a court, and an opl^oncnl, and I'll do the rest" 
Prepared at West Chester State Normal School; 1914 Tennis Team; 1913 
Glee Club. 




THE QUEEN OP .SHEBA 



Thelma Marguerite Taylor, $ M, Jenk- 
intown - - - - History 

"As good as a play" 
Prepared at Jenkintown High School ; 
Glee Club (HI-IV) ; Head of Em- 
ployment Bureau (H-HI) ; Classical 
Club ; Somerville. 



Eric Beresford Townsend, B ® n, Baltimore - - - 

"Here with a Loaf of Bread beneath the Bough, 
A Flask of Wine, a Book of Verse, — and Thou" 
Prepared at Jefferson School. 



Chcmistrv 



Josephine Elizabeth Tyson, Philadelphia ----- Latin 

"I am in earnest" 
Prepared at West Philadelphia High School for Girls ; Vice President of 
Classical Club (IV) ; Somerville. 



71 



Ever)' Swartlimcrean 

Needs 

ThePhoenix 



Read it First Then Send 

il Horn* 



TYPE 




SCRUBS 



PRACTICE 




IDEAL 



SWART 



f 



.•''-*^ 



SOUP 



HMORE 



TIES 



72 




SENIORS 




Alan Chester Valentine, <i> K*, Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Political Science 

"Let thine occut'ations he few," saith the sage, 
"if thou zvouldst lead a tranquil life" 

Prepared at Friends' Academy, Locust Valley, L. I. ; 
Football (II-III-IV); Lacrosse (III); Debate 
Board (LIMII-IV), Secretary (III); Phoenix 
Staff, Local Editor (II), Associate Editor (III), 
Editor-in-Chief (IV); Editor-in-Chief 1921 Hal- 
cyon ; Editor 1920 Y. M. C. A. Handbook ; 'Varsity 
Debate (II-III-IV), Captain (IV); Men's Execu- 
tive Committee, Secretary (III), President (IV-1) ; 
Class Vice President (1-2) ; Class President (II-l) ; 
"S" Club ; Devils ; Kwink ; Delta Sigma Rho ; Book 
and Key. 




rn.riunis thrke 




I'KETTY UNIFORM 



James Edward Waples, Hammonton, N. J. Chemistry 
"Every man has his own pleasures" 
Prepared at Hammonton High School. 

Charlotte Graves Washburn, X n, Washington, D. C. 

French 

"The fashion ivears out more apfarel than the ivoinan" 
Prepared at Friends' Select School, Washington ; 
Somerville ; Glee Club ; Cercle Francais. 



Ruth Mekeel Washburn, K A 0, Chappaqua, N. Y. 

'rfo ivoman hut a hlockhead ever zvrotc a letter 
except for money or for Frank" 

Prepared at Pleasonv-ille High School ; Third Place 
Gym Meet (I) ; Class Hockey (I) ; Class Gym (I- 
II-III) ; Somerville; English Club. 







■ t« 



73 



now •BOUT THAT; 




SENIORS 




Eleanor Rose Weber, K K r, Norristown Biology 

"My appetite comes to iiie zvhile eating" 

Prepared at Norristown High School ; Student 
Affairs Committee (II-IV) ; Somerville ; Campus 
Club. 




.<ji^^ 




Lena Amelia Weiss, Newton Falls, Ohio 

Political Science 
"Not in rezvards, but in the strength to strive. 
The blessing lies" 

Prepared at Newton Falls High School ; Local 
Editor Phoenix (HI-IV) ; 1921 Halcyon Staff; Stu- 
dent Affairs Committee (HI) ; Women's Executive 
Committee (IV); President of Somerville (IV); 
Glee Club (I-II-III) ; President of Glee Club (III) ; 
Mortar _Board. 

George Malcolm West_, $A®, Sayre 

Mechanical Engineering 
"Valves, bridges, and such he knows quite well" 
Prepared at Sayre High School ; Scrub Football 
(HI-IV); Glee Club (I-III-IV) ; Engisggfs' Club., 



Joseph Frederic Wiese, X, Parkesburg 



Economics 



"He hath a mint of phrases in his brain. 
And, whoi his ace is trumped, they arc forthcoming" 

Entered from University of Pennsylvania (II) ; Soccer 
(III-IV) ; Baseball (II-III-IV) ; "S" Club; Devils. 



Frances Dorothy Wills, K A 0, Pittsburgh 

"A light to guide, a rod 
To check the erring and repro'oe" 



English 



Entered from University of Pittsburgh (III) ; Local Editor 
of Phoenix (IV) ; Somerville. 




74 




SENIORS 




Grace Taylor Wilson, n B *, Lansdovvne - - - - - Latin 

"What a beautiful pussy you arc" 
Prepared at Lansdowne High School ; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (IV) ; Class Sec- 
retary (IV-1) ; Somerville; Classical Club; Cercle Francais. 



Aline Mathieson Woodrow, Ridgewood, N. J. Latin 

"And gladly would she learn, and gladly teach" 

Prepared at Paterson High School ; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (IV) ; President of Classical Club (IV) ; 
Class Scholarship (II-III-IV) ; Mortar Board; Phi 
Beta Kappa. 




H Ruth Harriet Woodward, Mendenhall 
"Be not righteous overmuch 



Biology 

Prepared at Kennett High School ; Glee Club ; Som- 
erville; Campus Club. 



'^»^ 



WHO Is 111 \ 1 W EIRn 
LOOKING (iUV 



Janet Graham Young, 
KKT, Philadelphia 



♦ fh,\,.0'^^<J-\ktu* 



French 




SOCIAL CLIMBERS 



"In the midst of arms the 
lazvs are silent" 

Prepared at Camden High School; Class Gym (I-II) ; Class Hockey (I-II- 
III-IV) : Class Secretary (II-l) ; Chairman Student Conduct Committee 
(IV) ; Glee Club; Somerville Play (III) ; Founders' Day Play (IV) ; Little 
Theater Club ; Mortar Board. 

Josephine Dean Zartman, AT, Philadelphia - _ - - English 

"Those that govern the most make the least noise" 
Prepared at Friends' Central School; English Club Play (III-IV) ; Student 
Affairs Committee (IV) ; President of English Club (IV) ; Eligible for 
Lucretia Mott Fellowship; Mortar Board. 



75 



"Ex-Mlembers of 1921 



!iIarcelu- Marie Achard Y>VA.« V>I»^Uh\ 
Eric Ainsworth, $ 2 K 
Edith Albertson, A r 
^^'II,LIAM Blaine Albright 
Doris Avlmer Arthur 
Miriam Edith Bailey, n B * 
Grace Alice Ballinger, A r 
Marion Gardner Bedell 
Mann Gluck Berg 
Dorothy Beach Boring 
Harry Nickles Boureau. A Y 
Grace Brinton, n B * r>i^k^ ■ i^- "yyitt-v-^ 
Mildred Runkle Burke 
Philip Haviland Burn 
Richard Dodge Campbell, K S 
Helen L. Caughey 
Paul William Chandler, $ K * 
CoATEs Coleman, Jr. 
Marguerite Coles, KA® TU<.ftM^-t/^ 
John Frederick Con way- 
Margaret Coolbaugh, XQ 
Helen Mae Davenport 
Joseph Miller Davenport, $ A ® 
Katherine Eliza Donnelly, n B * 
Irma Lucille Dunning, a V 
William PIolmes Durbin, * K * 
Frank Fitts. A Y 
Carroll Patterson Ford, $ 2 K 
IMar'i' Gladys Gegg 
Elizabeth Blakely Grahaji, n B $ 
Harrietts Louise Greiner, IT B * 
iMvRTON Ruth Haviland 



Frank Ralston Heavener, AY 

Barbara Forrester PIickling 

Frank Holman 

Jesse PIerman Holmes 

Mary Clothier Hull, K A 

Amy Vivien Hunter 

Walter Russell James 

Robert Swift Joyce, a Y 

Elizabeth Bopp Klemm, $M 

Dorothy Patterson Roller. X Q. 

Erna Charlotte Kreamer, K K r 

Harry PIartman Landis, Jr., K2 

Harry Willtam'*Lang. *2K " 

Helen Ruth L|,blang 

Alice Geraldine Lippincott. IT B * 

Charles PIoward Lungren. Jr.. $ A ® 

Morrison Cushman McKinley, *A® 

Juliet Canby Mace. K A ® 

Raymond Edward Macksey 

Frank Henry Marks 

John Alexander M.-\sters. * A 

John Lindsey Mather, Jr., * K* 

Alice Louise Morgan, XO 

Paul W. Neuenschwander, * K * 

Virginia Morse Packard, Xfi 

Katherine Palm 

Virginia Pentz 

Caroline Philips, KA® 

Frances Louise Purdy 

Angus Marshall Reynolds 

Margaret Elizabeth Richter 

Helen Mae Rogers 



76 



£x-^embcrs of 1921 — Continued 



Rebecca Rose 

Henry Swautlev Ruth, * S K 

Dorothy Elizabeth Saylor 

Helen Shoemaker 

Clarence Albert Short 

Adele Lyzette Siemans 

Ellis Leeds Spackman, Jr., * K * 

Wallace Naylor Spring, K2 

Dorothy S pro at 

Mary Elizabeth Stannard, xn 

Henrietta Floyd Stewart, n B <J> 

David Dewey Sutton, K 2 

Irma Josephine Tate 

Elizabetpi Titus 

Edith Cook Turner 

Raymond William Uhl, $A(B) 

Bernice Wright 



Marjorie Fkancics Vikden 

Nellie Lee Walker, K A W 

Mary Kerlin Walters 

Elizabeth Ward 

Dorothy M. Watson 

Virginia Way, K K r 

Samuel Bentley Webb, $ K * 

Milton Riley Westcott 

Andrew S. Whitaker, K 2 

Emilie Hinds White, IIB* fVw SLf-o/p-V "P^^ 

J(HiN JosiAH White, Jr., AY 

Evelyn Engel Wich, XQ 

Josephine Wildman, K A 

John Gilmore Wilson, A Y 

Ly'dia Lois Withers 

Marion Emilie Woerwag 




77 




78 




79 




80 








AN lA ( . HASTINGS 



FRANK H. JACKSON 



3unior (Tlass Officers 



First Semester 

Lanta C. Hastings - President - 

Benjamin E. Groff Vice President 

Dorothy Nassau - - Secretary - 

G. Morton Daller - Treasurer - 



Second Semester 

Frank H. Jackson 

Allen G. Clark 

Frances Runk 

Carl J. Geiges 





DOROTHY NASSAU 



PBANCES RFNK 



SI 




DOROTHY FLORENCE ANDERSON 

GLENSIDE 

EiigUsIi 

J\Iost people despise bills — not so wijli Dot. Judging from 
Uie stamps we see her consume, we can be sure there's one 
Bill for whom she has no terrible antipathy. Ne.xt to writing 
letters, her favorite indoor sport is climbing on the table to 
amuse her pet mouse. But if you really want to hear her 
squeal, just listen when her wife begins to tickle her. Why, 
the unearthly noises that issue from that room when the two 
Dots are having one of their fights, are enough to raise the 
dead. Our sympathies were with Miss Michener all right. 
when Dot and Dot, Inc., chose the room right across the 
hall from her. 



JOSEPH GARNER ANTHONY 

PHILADELPHIA 

Chemical Engineering 

The silent partner in the firm Frank and Tony, Inc., deal- 
ers in guaranteed -not -to-wear-tear-run-down-or-bag-at-the- 
knees, all-wool-but-the-buttons clothes, hose, and other spe- 
cialties. The firm will swear to buy anything and make 
something out of it. 

Tony used to be a bear-cat on the prep school gridiron, 
and he would have lived up to his reputation here, too, had 
it not been for the mistake in the signals that gave the ball 
to Hoke in the last minute of the historic Delaware game, 
and kept Tony from putting over the winning score. How- 
ever, he has made up for this by his great work in the spring 
sport that makes football look like a pink tea. 

Our hero's political aspirations received a severe jolt in 
the recent national elections. But, Tony, how is it that such 
a staunch Democrat should be so loyal a supporter of Pen- 
rose? 





WILLIAM HAMILTON AULENBACK 

PHILADELPHIA 

English 

"Ham" is another one of these preacher birds that dropped 
in our midst after the war. You see, he was a gob. After 
enlisting back in the early days of the conflict, so as to be 
sure to get into the thick of it, he succeeded in getting to 
the Great Lakes Training Station out near Chicago, and re- 
mained there until the war was safely over. This was rather 
hard on his immortal soul, as he soon learned to cuss his 
luck and to play poker. And so, one night after he had been 
badh' beaten at the latter game, he turned over a new leaf, 
and decided to quit cussing and to preach the Gospel. When 
he got out of the navy, he headed straight for the Swarth- 
niore Theological Seminary (co-educational, college life in 
home setting), and established himself in Section E. He gets 
his training and his subjects for sermons out here, and prac- 
tices on inmates of a deaf-and-dumb school in Philly. 



82 



MARY ISABEL BAUMGARTNER 

PHILADELPHIA 

Eiiglisli 
Ingredients Pei-ceiilage 

Ability to laugh (camouflage as a giggle) - - 40% 

Executive ability (shown in Chautauqua) - - - 3l)% 

Studiousness (fore runner of *BK) - - . ],")% 

Tact (displayed one rainy night with no umbrella) - !»% 

Athletic tendency (when vaulting over horse) - '3% 

Big heartedness (toward roommate when sleepy) - 3% 

Chance of appearing thin - - . . . ()% 





ALBERT LAURENCE BAXTER 

CHESTER 

Economics 

The only n-.an running around loose who can sell Chev- 
rolets using the same line he sold Hudsons with. It's a pro- 
ductive line — sells anything at any time — and the Chester 
sales-expert will offer any car he thinks a man will buy. 

Lerx is supposed to be one of those lonely travelers who 
put in their appearance at 7 :59 every morning. Soop Rob- 
erts even thinks so ; but we know better, as does any card 
player, swimmer, or soph rustler for Halcyon ads ; even 
some of the girls know that he keeps his other suit of 
pajamas in the bottom floor of Section C, and sponges on 
his brothers in the cracker room for subsistence. However, 
his conduct in front of the cheering section in the fall, and 
in the swimming pool in winter make up for any such slight 
criminal deficiencies. 



JACKSON MILLER BLACKBURN 

PHILADELPHIA 

Chemistry 

Famous among the low-life of Wharton is Spike Black- 
burn, the greatest living exponent of the "second-hand plays 
low" theory. He has no peer in the wicked games of bridge 
and five hundred; if he cannot win by Hoyle, he uses Chinese 
methods. He handles either with amazing finesse. 

When not occupied by more important duties, he hies his 
way to Dr. Alleman's citadel and teases the Tri Methyl 
Methane into action. And there again have honors been 
heaped upon him, in no less a shape than "Lord High Lighter 
of the Bunsen Burner," which is second only to his bunkie's 
job of "Keeper of the Atomic Weights." 




83 




FRANCIS CATON BLAIR 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 

Political Science 

Heredity doesn't mean so nincli, after all. We decided 
that when we heard Dr. Blair orate on Fonnders' Day. As 
a program committee for the Society for the Collection and 
Promulgation of Miscellaneous Jokes. "Kate" has assumed 
huge proportions. All who are privileged to attend the night- 
ly meetings in President Chase's room will agree that the 
success of the organization is largely due to efforts of the 
gentleman in question. These meetings convene about two 
A. M., and continue until the milkman makes his rounds. 
After a benediction by "Boots" and a hearty repast, the 
members dress for breakfast. 

But, joking aside, "Kate" is really ambitious. The art- 
work of this book amply proves the contention that we have 
with us a future Goldberg. 



ERNEST MASON BLISS 

PHILADELPHIA 

Chemical Engineering 

The man who said, "Ignorance is Bliss," never saw this 
one. Jack has been disproving the statement ever since his 
advent as a freshman, and has shown ability in all lines. The 
profs assist hini in the disgusting display of his intelligence, 
too, for he's never called upon until all the others have failed. 
Of course, he makes the demonstration and saves the profs. 
We hate to think of the revelations that would occur if Jack- 
took his full quota of cuts. 

As the best plunger among our "fishes," Jack is very much 
in the swim this season. 





BERNICE GORDON BONNER 

PHILADELPHIA 

Political Science 

"Oh, dear, I've got to get the 1:29! Elsie! (crescendo) 
Elsie ! ! Have you my hat ?" 

After a fi-antic search, an appropriate hat is found in 
place of the missing one, and "Bonnie'' starts out, blithely 
singing as she goes. In a minute she returns. 

"I forgot what time I said I'd be at the dentist's, and I've 
lost my fifty-trip ticket. Maybe it's in my desk. Here it is. 
Well, good-bye, it's 1 :-!8 now and I'd l)etter start. I think 
Til go see a show and drop in at the dentist's some other 
time." 



84 



THOMAS FREDERICK BONSALL 

GLENOLDEN 

Economics 

Tommy came to Swartlimore one clay about three years 
ago, and he is still coming. Every morning's sim sees him 
on his sleepy way up the Hill. Sleepy is right, for he never 
thinks of bed except as a place to go when there isn't any- 
thing more exciting to take in, 

As an economist, Tommy is the man behind l)r, Urdahl's 
throne. Dub is merely filling in till Tommy graduates, and 
then does several years research work to determine the total 
number of hours sleep he has enjoyed under the guidance of 
his Patron Saint, as he fondly designates his major professor. 

When not doing advanced study in the library, the lad 
from Glenolden spends his leisure time in the swimming tank, 
in winter, and, in the spring, "trying to break his neck or the 
record" at the pole-vaulting game. 





CAROLYN GENEVIEVE BRAUNWORTH 

HOPEWELL, N. J. 

Latin 

Carolyn is one of those demure little Quaker maidens who 
hails, nevertheless, from the wilds of New Jersey. We say 
demure, though we admit it's pure guess work. At least, she 
gives one that impression. But we have heard vague rumors 
from her wife about dances and dates and all sorts of wild 
things when she gets back up Hopewell way. And from that 
occasional glint in her eye and a knowing smile on her lips, 
we're almost tempted to think it's true. 

Ed. Note— It is. 



ALEXANDER LUPOLD BRESSLER 

PHILADELPHIA 

Mechanical Engineering 

Alex entered college as a member of 1021. and stuck it 
out until 1922 had been around here for a year, when the 
vast superiority of the younger class became apparent to 
him and he decided that he must get into it by hook or by 
crook. As Alex is a good student, he could not flunk out 
without attracting too much attention, and he was too tender- 
hearted to offend his own class openly, so he came to the con- 
clusion that the only way to gain his end was to drop out 
of college for a year. He did this, and '21's loss is our gain. 

Although he is a member of a department in which the 
students are notoriously hardest worked and lowest paid. 
Alex finds time to sing two nights a week on Bert Brown's 
Glee Club. 




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86 



MIRIAM ROBIN BREUNINGER 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

English 

Robin came bobbin' to Swarthmore one day, 

And once she arrived she decided to stay ; 

Her friends down iii Washington miss her and fear 

That now we have met her, we'll keep her right here. 

At hockey she shines and at basketball, too ; 

At tennis she's great — there's not much she can't do. 

She's brim full of pep and her friends all declare 

That robins like this are exceedingly rare. 





WILLIAM BRINTON BROSIUS 

AVONDALE 

Economics 

Here you see the class baby — sweet smiles, pretty hair, 
blushes and all that — age 18 years, 2 months, 14 days and 5 
minutes. To further his charm, Bill is the best-looking boy 
in his gang, excepting, of course, Ed Atkins. If you don't 
agree, ask William. 

He has won his greatest honors in the gym. No, not at 
basketball or at any similar brutal pastime, but at dancing. 
Did you ever see him waltz? His face takes on a Greek- 
statue expression, and, expecting the girl to follow his ex- 
ample, he leaves his mind in a dream as he perambulates 
serenely around. 

When Bill Ware left college, this Bill was compelled to 
get into the succession for the business job on the Phoenix. 
We sympathize, but think it wfill do this prospective banker 
good to learn that, in this harsh world, all that glitters is 
not cheese. 



HAROLD LURCOTT BUTTERWORTH 

CHELTENHAM 

Economics 

If you ever happen to see around the halls a demure mem- 
ber of the "Bro Bummel Society," wearing a sheepish grin 
on his face (indicating that he has just done something devil- 
ishly devilish), you will need no further introduction to 
"Boots." Chances are he has just finished doing one of three 
things: (1) He has just succeeded in escaping from the 
noon meal with a dozen cakes, and has been forced to eat 
one on the spot to make room for the rest in his pockets ; 

(2) He has just been fussing, has pulled one of his little 
anecdotes, and can't get over the hit he must have made ; 

(3) He has just heard a rumor that the Glee Club is con- 
templating another trip to Atlantic City. 

Despite all rumors to the contrary, he has established a 
rep as a hard worker, a good athlete, and a persistent sleeper. 




87 




HENRY SHERMAN CHASE, JR. 

ELKINS PARK 

Economics 

H-en looks like the most harmless person imaginalile. 
Even a year with Downing in E Section failed to stamp him 
with that hard-boiled look, after two j'ears as a gob had also 
failed. Elis love for the water is his most pronounced char- 
acteristic. This affection took him into the swimming pro- 
fession — as manager of this year's team. He immediately 
planned to take his navy to visit some of the few places he 
hadn't taken in while in his country's service. Buffalo, Chi- 
cago, St. Louis, and other nearby towns won his favor, but 
Doc Palmer couldn't see Hen as a Cook's Tour head, and 
blasted the poor boy's fondest hopes. 



CHARLOTTE STEVENS CHRISMAN 

WEST CHESTER 

French 

Now we are sure she has an aim 

To which she e'er aspires, 

Of trips to town to halls of fame 

This maiden never tires. 

The technique of famed Zimbalist 

Or Kreisler's magic tone. 

The melody of Heifetz' strings 

She strives to make her own. 





WILLIAM RUFUS CISNEY 

RICHMOND HILL, N. Y. 

Economics 

Times have changed, and so has Bill, since his advent 
here during the Reign of Terror. The lion of the class, he 
was, and his curly black locks were very much in evidence 
at all college functions. It is even said that he changed from 
Engineering to Economics in order to get enough time for 
his steadily increasing social duties. But then came his 
sophomore year, and he learned the lesson of his young life. 
He found that "you get out of this place exactly what you 
put into it," that is when you're dealing with men; and so 
he won the football managership by dint of hard work. He 
also discovered that you really can never tell what a girl is 
going to do. His favorite song used to be "Smile a While," 
but now he sings, with Kipling. 

"A woman is only a woman, but a good little-cigar is a 
smoke." 



ALLEN GRAY CLARK 

PHILADELPHIA 

Mechanical Engineering 

According to Hoylc, or is it Queeiisbiiry, Al's physiog- 
nomy indicates an indolent, indulgent, amiable disposition. 
He is all that and more. Superficially carefree, Init secretly 
ambitious, Al manages to pull good marks regardless of how 
many wrestling matches Earp and Burnett drag him to. As 
a result of his association with Earp in the laundry business, 
he has become sUilled in the art of making you feel good 
while he takes your money. 

But a word about the sterner side of this scion of tlie 
Clark family. He is real handy chasing the pig-skin, and 
has even graced the basketball floor in times past. He has 
recently invaded Neptune's realms with Eddie Rauh. Al 
says he expects to be sticking around close when they hand 
out them diploma things. 





KATHERINE LEE CROSBY 

HAYWARD, CALIF. 

Economics 

Have you met our new California girl? No? Well, you 
don't know what you've missed. When you meet her, though, 
you want to be very careful, because she can find out all 
about your past by just looking at your hand. Is she good 
looking"? We don't have to tell you — look at her picture and 
see for yourself. Is she a garnet rooter? She hasn't missed 
a home game yet, and she knew exerybody in college two 
weeks after she arrived. Yes. sir, Leland Stanford lost a 
prize when she moved east to the little college on the hill. 



EDITH GIHON CUGLEY 

PHILADELPHIA 

English 

Don't you hear that chatter-chatter? 

Hear that clatter up the stair? 
What on earth can be the matter? 

Sounds like fifty girls are there ! 

Oh, you know who's got that giggle, 
Makes you want to giggle, too. 

Sure it's Cugs ! She's always present 
When there's anything to do! 

When you're feeling sort of pepless. 
Maybe sometimes even sad ; 

Just find Cugs, and you'll soon realize 
Swarthmore's really not so bad ! 




89 




GEORGE MORTON DALLER 

CHESTER 

Malhcinalii's 

The original self-starter, Unk arrived from the land 
made famous bj' Larkin, Harvey and Liikens, and made good 
in spite of the reputation accruing therefrom. He is en- 
thusiastic in his defense of the town of gang fights and race 
riots, even violent at times. 

Larkin is an athlete ; Harvey is the one and only com- 
petitor of Grobert and Dudley, Inc. ; Lukens is the only man 
in the world who rooms with Bartleson. In spite of such a 
monopoly of all the forms of distinction, Unk has found an 
outlet for his genius, and a field in which to win distinction. 
He has found the secret of talking the maximum percentage 
of his waking hours with the minimum amount of knowledge. 



HANNAH MARY DARLINGTON 

WEST CHESTER 

Englisli 

Have you ever noticed a meek little girl trotting around 
Parrish or up and down the asphaltum, always with the air 
of more important business to be done? Apparently she's 
always quiet and everything that anyone from West Chester 
should be, but just go by West House some dark night. 
You'll probably hear an unearthly shriek, followed by many 
bumps and then some. Don't be alarmed; it's only Hannah's 
recreation time. 





LA MAR HAY DAVENPORT 

DUBOIS 

Biology 

Mox hales from a little one-horse joint up in the north- 
ern part of the state of which his guv'nor is the mayor, the 
only doctor, and the village preacher. The son and heir, be- 
lieving in the divine right theory, came down here in ciuest 
of the knowledge necessary for a man in his situation. And 
from such lowly beginnings, behold the result ! He is now 
a member of the Swarthmore Masonic Order, the class of 
1922, the Y. M. C. A. and the Athletic Association: and he 
expects an M.D. in live years from date. Besides all these 
assets, and greater than any of them, will be his connections 
with Slocum and Hutchinson, the Republican state leaders. 
With such an education, and with such favor from the 
powers that be, Mox may even get to be Mayor of DuBois, 
who knows ? 



DO 



JEANNETTE DELL 

WOODBURY, N. J. 

linglisli 

Given : 

Favorite sport — Returning to Jolin over the week-end. 
Favorite city — Doylestown. 

Favorite course — Analysis and Interpretation of Episco- 
pal Hims. 
Favorite song — I Need Tliee Every Hour. 

To prove : 

Nothing — it's self-evident. 

Conclusion : 

Am I engaged? Why 1 guess not, 
At least, it's not official. 
Perhaps some day I'll change my name, 
But never my initial ! 





FRANK SIDEBOTHAM DUDLEY 

PHILADELPHIA 

Economics 
Here is another of the ancient warriors who joined the 
garnet ranks during that historic war year when we trounced 
Penn. In fact, Dago helped do the dirty work. For some 
reason or other, though, life ceased to appear to him any- 
thing but a deminition bore, and he flunked out so badly that 
his presence was not requested on the grid squad of the fol- 
lowing year. But all that was before Aphrodite smiled on 
him. Last year she did more than smile on him — she laughed 
— and everything was changed. He first startled us by pass- 
ing everything. Then, by means of a torrid summer at' 
Columbia, he regained his lost credits and became again a 
qualified member of our illustrious class. Since then, he has 
prospered under that same be^^•itching smile, uttering always 
before consigning himself to the land of dreams his favorite 
prayer : 

"Now I lay me down to sleep, 
I pray of Ruth I'll think a heap; 
If I should die before I wake, 
I know she 11 jump into the lake." 



JOHN EVANSON EARP 

PHILADELPHIA 

Economics 

"Johnnie" is one of the noted trio of financiers known as 
Burnett. Clark, Earp & Co., dance promoters. In company 
with the other members of the corporation he exploits his 
fellow students in little affairs given at the Woman's Club, 
The Bellevue, and other places designed to seduce the under- 
grad from the paths of Minerva. But he is not only a busi- 
ness man. The shock of tow hair adorning (?) his noble 
brow covers grey matter which habitually saves him from 
E's, and his athletic abilities have been felt by many of Swarth- 
more's rivals on the football field and on the track. And 
his political superiority has advanced his social position to 
such an extent that he was forced to invest in evening- 
clothes as a necessity to his permanent attendance at sorority 
dances. As to his future, it is still open to conjecture as to 
whether he will become a millionaire — via Terpsichoreas. or 
Matrimonious. 




91 




WILLARD SLINGERLAND ELSBREE 

PRESTON HOLLOW, N. Y. 

Political Science 

Le me introduce to you, ladies and gents, a man who 
never needs an introduction. He can introduce himself. And 
within five minutes of said introduction, he can sell you five 
pages of ads in an extinct publication, or induce you to put 
your rainy-day money into a company formed for the pur- 
pose of making peach marmalade out of sawdust. His 
motto is, 

"There's nothing either good or bad 
But talking makes it so." 

But aside from that SlingerbuU is noted for being the 
handsomest man in his chapter. Why, if you dressed him 
up in a pair of East Indian trousers, a feather headdress, and 
tattooed his cheeks, you could pass him off as the Prince of 
the Fiji Islands. He has that savage strut, you know. 



ALEXANDER JOHNSON ESREY 

LLANERCH 

Economics 

During his first two years here, we thought Tod was a 
day student. He was never at breakfast, at the Pie Shop 
for lunch and at the Tea Room for dinner. He had nightly 
dates and week-end parties which he accounted for with the 
old story of having been home, etc. In those days, he was 
chummy with both Deans, and had lengthy conferences with 
Alec and weekly teas with Miss Richards. It was even 
feared that he would usurp Shaw's job.as reception commit- 
tee of one for homesick freshman girls. 

But the change had to come and it did — with the New 
Year. Tod has forsaken the glittering mazdas for good, and 
is spending all his time coaching an infant organization which 
has a great future ahead of it. — "The Wharton Bridge- 
Hounds A-Ssociation." 





ELLA HANSELL FALCK 

PHILADELPHIA 

Matlieinaiics 

"jNIiss Falck, will you please draw that figure on the board 
and explain it to the class?" 

Thus speaks Dr. j\Iiller, and everyone else takes the same 
attitude toward Ella. She does her job well, and just at 
present that job is to make a success of her college life. 
Under college life she includes such things as Student Gov- 
ernment, H.ALCYON, class hockey, drawing scenery for plays, 
college dances, etc. But of course she doesn't mind a few 
details like that — Ella wouldn't. 



92 



EVALYN FRANCES FARQUHARSON 

MEDIA 

Frencli 

]f Evalyn lived among us she'd: 

{ I ) Keep on pulling high grades without over mneh 
study ; 

('-') Keep Parrish from getting too much sleep in off 
hours ; 

(3) Provide home food for the hungry; 

(4) Dance a lot, and show the teams a thing or two; 

(5) Just generally show Swarthmore what kind of good 
sports Media can produce. 





MARJORIE LAWRENCE FELL 

PHILADELPHIA 

Political Science 

Want someone who can make you believe black is white, 
and then turn around and convince yon that black is black? 
Get JNIarge Fell to put np her arguments — she'll convince you 
either way. It's not only what she says that brings you 
around ; it's her charming manner and the irresistible way 
she looks at you. Some say she's lazy, — but have you ever 
seen her tackle something that just had to be done and 
couldn't be done? Marge goes to it and does it. 



WALTON CANBY FERRIS 

MILWAUKEE. WIS. 

Political Science 
Dignified? Why that's what his middle name implies, 
dignity put up by the can ! You need only to look at him 
to know that he is a student supporting the heavy burden 
of a two-point average. It might be said in this connection 
that he has an aunt named Dr. Newport, and that we all 
believe in heredity (and pull). As an outlet to these super- 
abundant intellectual powers, he is at present engaged in 
editing this H.\lcyon. He has the courage of his convictions, 
he stands up for the radicals, and for the equally unpopular 
Democratic Party (notice who his major prof is?) These 
are but a few of his many virtues (?). but, with only these 
at hand, no one can doubt for an instant that Walt will be a 
great man. Perhaps he will represent his state in the Halls 
of Congress and hold vast masses of people spellbound with 
his magnetic personality while he pleads in eloquent rhetoric 
for a "wet Milwaukee." Watch him, fellow Swarthmoreans, 
he is destined for a place in the sun. 

93 





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VERA SHEARER FLETCHER 

BEDFORD 

Latin 

Honest, haven't yon got a bit of food ? I know I snicllcd 
fudge somewhere up this way, and I can't find it a-n-y-wliei'e. 
No, I won't go home, you inhospitable piece of pineapple, 
it's too blank quiet down on our hall. Sure, I've got some- 
thing to do, — two exams and a theme for tomorrow, and I 
have to get out of hockey somehow. But I should worry, 
we're going to have a party tonight, and I've got to get some 
food. S'long, come and see me some day. 





MARION BAKER GARRETT 

PHILADELPHIA 

English 

In spite of her name Marion really has something worth- 
\\ hile in her upper-story. Yon don't find any cobwebs there 
are lots of good ideas and some of the wittiest remarks, 
which make her very good company. Another thing for 
which she is well known, or rather, for which she is not well 
known, is the way she spends her week-ends. She says she 
spends them serenely at home, but, from little things she has 
dropped, we aren't so sure about that. 



ANNE MARY GAULT 

PHILADELPHIA 

Mathematics 

Anne always has that ready-to-wear smile and giggle 
whenever she meets you, and never seems to get blue or 
cross like the rest of us. Whether it's hard work or a 
table-party, she's in it with full force. But, when it comes 
to a dance, she's happiest and at her best, especially if that 
one little freshman is there. He, whoever he is, certainly 
agrees with us that she can trip the light fantastic. 




95 




HELEN GAWTHROP 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 

French 

"Oh, girls I I just heard the most exciting story. It's 
perfectly marvelous. But 1 did the most terrihle thing! 
Just as I was telling Marian, he went Ijy and 1 just know 
he heard me. I know it positively. I'll never go down- 
stairs again, no never ! You couldn't make me. Say, that 
isn't candy, is it? Oh, Boy, lead me to it. After teaching 
kids never to drink beer or eat candy, this is some party. 
Sure, I have a gym class at the settlement. Look me over, 
girls !" And Helen dashes off to write a Round Robin to 
most of the missionaries at Silver Bay. 



CARL JOSEPH GEIGES 

CAMDEN, N. J. 

Economics 

"The kid" took the ferry across from Camden, one day 
back in 1918, to see the sights on the other side of the big 
river. He came out to Swarthmore just in time to join our 
army, and to help lick old Penn for the first time in many 
moons. He has stuck around ever since, and at last his 
patience has been rewarded. Last fall, the reign of King 
Larkin was declared at an end, and a successor was sought. 
The kid applied, and received the job. H Pard is Mutt, the 
kid is Jef¥, but he can show most of the big boys a thing or 
two when it comes to threading a way through a gang of 
tacklers, or in making essential tackles himself. "The bigger 
they are, the harder they fall, eh, kid?" In the springtime, 
his energies are turned in the direction of ''that ruffian In- 
dian game," and the shifty quarterback becomes an elusive 
attack man. 





EDWARD ARMSTRONG GILLESPIE 

SWARTHMORE 

Mechanical Engineering 

Every morning a slowly moving figure may be seen round- 
ing the station, and strolling up the asphaltum. Like the 
Cheshire cat, his most pronounced feature is his grin, and 
this part of him can be distinguished as he approaches, be- 
fore any other details of his appearance are even visible. 

Gillie came to us via the Mercersburg route, and has 
brought with him those traits which have been characteristic 
of his predecessors, which are (1) performing for the co-eds 
to their extreme delight, and (2) holding his own in a to- 
bacco chewing contest with any hard-boiled egg in Whar- 
ton. But he can get away with these things because he is 
a Phi Psi. What is a Phi Psi? A Phi Psi is a -gentleman, 
a scholar, and a good judge of ice-water. 



96 



GRACE EDEL GOURLEY 

MELROSE PARK 

Mathematics 

Why is it that when you think of hockey, you immediately 
think of Gourley? The names do sound a little alike, hut 
surely it can't he that. No, it's not. It's just that when you 
see the ball coming down the field with more than ordinary 
speed, you knoiv that Gourley's behind it. She's not given 
to fussing — in fact, we have a suspicion that Wharton has 
no place on her "bird's-eye view of Swarthmore." Gourley 
conforms perfectly to type, all that is, except in one detail. 
She has the brown and white sneakers, the plaid skirt, the 
slim middle, the sailor's knot tie, . and the tortoise-shell 
glasses, but why, oh, why, Gourley, those long tresses? 






m 


jH 


^Bm^P 


W 


H 


Hm^ 


M 


9 




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i^Hpi. J 


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CHARLOTTE HAND GRIFFEN 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

Clwinistry 

When "Griff" was interviewed preparatory to doing her 
write-up, and begged for suggestions (as to her character), 
she glibly responded, "Oh. tcK 'em I'm a nice girl." We ad- 
mit the point, but we also know that "Griff" would get 
mighty gruff if that were the only one of her many attain- 
ments to receive recognition here. She is well known in 
many lines, starring in hockey and basketball, and even 
being a conspicuous member of the fussing contingent; but 
she won her chiefest renown when she donned old clothes 
one day and beat all the men at nerve by climbing around 
the rafters in the men's gym to cover the ceiling lights for 
her sophomore class dance. 



ELIZABETH BRADWAY GRISCOM 

SALEM, N. J. 

Biology 

The most important thing about this Quaker Betty is that 
she is one of the famous Griscom sisters, famous for their 
hospitality, versatility, and originality. If you happen to get 
lost in the wilds of New Jersej', just mention the fact that 
you know the Griscom girls and your life is saved. 19'22 is 
hicky to be able to claim Betty as one of its members, for, 
when any work is to be done, such as decorating for dances, 
managing picnics, etc., we know whom we can count on. As 
a booster for Swarthmore, there is none better, but where 
Betty shines most is sporting around the golf links of the 
Salem Country Club. Here Betty spends her summers, and. 
with the aid of the nearby cornfield, keeps the golf ball manu- 
facturers in business. 




97 




BENJAMIN ENGLE GROFF 

ELIZABETHTOWN, N. J. 

Cliciiiislry 
"My native lieatli is Elizabethtown, the liome of the Klein 
Chocolate Company and other commercial organizations of 
great repute and renown, I feel that, as an exponent of the 
ice-\\agon industry, I am a worthy representative of this 
city without a peer (in the length of its name)." Thus 
quoths j\lr. Groff in terms couched in (an)esthetic flights of 
rhetoric far beyond the understanding of the average indi- 
vidual. But his activities are not confined to his natal vil- 
lage, for he roams abroad into the fruitful valley of the Sus- 
(|uehanna, there to relax in perfect lassitude in the charming 
atmosphere of Polh', who still plays dreamy tunes on his 
throbbing heartstrings. It is said that, as the shadows of 
dusk were falling, he "habitually absconded with the in- 
candescent luminaries," but his cjuality as "Big Ben" always 
warned him to go before the paternal ire was aroused. With 
all these blissful expectations, Ben is still waiting, waiting, 
morning, noon, and night, — on those who brave college meals. 



DOROTHY FRANCES HAINES 

SWARTHMORE 

Frencli 

Ladies and gentlemen, we have here a specimen of that 
almost extinct species of Swarthmorean, a girl who doesn't 
rush around like a chicken with its head off. She does daily 
without any effort what most of us consider quite a feat — 
she makes her bed before breakfast and walks (not runs) to 
breakfast with her hair-net securely fixed and all the buttons 
on her waist fastened ! But that is not the only attraction 
of this infant prodigy. She has a car and her home is in 
the village. That means that we can go down there and bang 
on her piano while she makes one of her short and snappy 
visits home, and maybe, if we're real good, she'll give us an 
orange to suck. 





ANNA ELIZABETH HALDEMAN 

MALVERN 

English 

Anna is Ellen Hayes' rival in the length of time it takes 
her to see through a joke, but, now that Ellen's gone, Anna 
says she gets the first prize. She explains it by saying, aptly 
enough, that no one could be expected to see through most 
of the jokes around here. She also says that her brother 
Waldo is a mighty fine boy, and that any gir! who gets him 
is lucky. 

If you're looking for trouble, go to Anna, — not that she's 
in it, but people who are always go to Haldey to get a grain 
of comfort and some of the groceries Waldo sends her. 



98 



ORMSBY DUVALL HAMPSON 

GOVANS, MD. 

Chcinislry 

Gaze upon tliat name. No pnmp ever had a handle like 
that, you'll agree. Something hke the famous "Wesley Regi- 
nald O'Neille." So you can imagine our instinctive thoughts 
when forming a preconception of anyone possessing such a 
handle. But also imagine our surprise in meeting the gentle- 
man in question; for it's a total misnomer (except when he 
is warhling for the Glee Cluli). Folks must so christen a 
man to make him prove he can ouUive the evil effects, which 
Hampy has certainly succeeded in doing. 

Hampy comes from Baltee-mo'. He believes in that town, 
too. Don't ever he so thoughtless as to admit you haven't 
been there, or Hampy will inform you that you haven't trav- 
eled much, and your education might have been better. But 
it's in the spring that this Marylander is most in evidence. 
The season gets into his legs, ^nd he does .the high-jumping 
act to perfection. 





EDITH MARIA HARE 

WILMINGTON, OHIO 

English 



Swarthmore had 



Palmer 



Ohio had 



S Cox 



/ Sproul W..1U 110.U ^ Harding 

We laid a snare and caught Edith Hare, so, — 

( Palmer 

Swarthmore has ■( Sproul 

( Edith Hare 



AVERY DRAPER HARRINGTON, JR. 

PHILADELPHIA 

Biology 

"Duke" is a general in the army of the unknown on the 
hill, due to his daily migration from Philly. Therefore we 
see little of him, except when the college picture is taken, and 
when the other migratory birds gather in the locker-room 
at the gym to listen to the "Duke's" eloquence as he relates 
some startling episode of the last week-end. 

"Duke" expects to wear an M.D. after his name some day, 
and is even now giving Mike Robe and his team their daily 
work-out in Doc Trotter's emporium. Time not spent either 
at this or at migration he spends arguing with "Ducky" about 
the supremacy of mind over matter. 




99 




LANTA CORRINE HASTINGS 

DANVILLE, ILL. 

Mechanical Engineering 

"Bud" is the "Boy from the Golden West." without the 
musical accompaniment — he doesn't need it. Get him to tell 
you how he bummed his way home Christmas, and reached 
Chicago as soon as the other fellows who squandered good 
money on R. R. fare ; or how they mine coal in Illinois ; or 
how the Tanks treated 'em rough ; or how to play St. Peter 
in the dining-room. He probably won't do it, but any of his 
numerous friends will. 

Ever since he returned as Lieutenant Hastings, "Bud" has 
been chasing Carter hard for the honors of being the best en- 
tertainer on the Hill. He can shake a "laig" that would make 
any coon turn up his toes and kick the bucket with envy. 



ANNA FRANCES HEAFFORD 

PHILADELPHIA 

Political Science 

If yon can bob your hair when all about you 

Still wear it long, and look at yon askance ; 
If 3'Ou can be in every show that's going, 

And teach 'em what it really means to dance ; 
If you can lill the whole four years of college 

With sports on field, in gym, or in the water, 
Yours is this college, girl, with all that's in it. 

And, which is more, you'll be like Ann, my daughter 





JOHN MADDUX HILGERT 

BOOTHWYN 

Economics 

Here is another former member of 1921 who discovered 
his mistake, and dropped out for a year in order to join our 
merry gang. And sure enough a change in class was all 
that was needed to make him blossom forth. Formerly an 
alchemist, he came to his senses and joined the economics 
contingent. Once a shy young thing, he has changed into an 
actor first on the Chautauqua circuit and then in the Found- 
ers' Day plays. There's one trouble with being an actor, 
though, that Johnnj' has found out. To quote old Ben 
Johnson : 

"The trouble is with the actor's art 
That he's apt to act too well ; 
And to step right into the hero's part, 
And forget " 



100 



ETHEL HINDS 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

English 

"Do you know whom I like best in this college? Ethel 
Hinds. She's a peach, believe me. She sure made us Fresh- 
men feel right at home when we tackled this place, and when- 
ever I've gone up to see her, she's always been busy — work- 
ing for the class dance, some committee, or helping someone 
with her work or college problems. No, I guess you didn't 
know she did all that stuff unless you know her well, be- 
cause she doesn't go around spreading all she does — but take 
it from me, go to it and get to know her — she's worth it." 





FRANK HOKE 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Electrical Engineering 

"Hey — you — how 'bout that? You guys think I'm noisy 
and talk too much, but you're all wrong. Why, you ought 
to hear this man Larkin, then you'd know who makes all the 
noise on A-3. And girls — ^say, fellows — did you see that 
letter I got with gold edges on the paper? Bet you don't 
have any of 'em that treat you that way. But say, they just 
naturally fall for me, even want me to meet their families. 
."Kud the way they yelled for me when I starred in that Dela- 
ware game. And the fellows think I'm some boy, too. I 
beat Carter, Larkin, and Harvey out for King of A-3, and 
you just ought to see the bouquets I get when I play my sax. 
All in all, I think I'm a pretty good guy, and Swarthmore 
ought to appreciate my breaking away from De Pauw to 
come here." 



HERBERT LUCIUS HUTCHINSON 

READING 

Polilicat Science 

"Hi, Herbie, going up to Lancaster this week-end?" 

''No, this is about the fifth time I've told you I have to 
write up a bunch of stuff for the Phoenix this week. But 
say. Pratt, I'll bet you two solid iron men that the blank 
business management was responsible for the Phoenix being 
late yesterday." 

"Well—" 

"That's enough, you know you don't have anything to 
say. But quit bothering me. I've got to do some debate, 
and read a couple of novels for the old Ice Berg. This 
broadening bunk sure takes the time." 

So passes "Scoop," the Phoenix scribe, along the even 
tenor of his way. 




101 




102 



FRANK HAND JACKSON 

PHILADELPHIA 

Political Science 

The senior meniljer and general sales manager of tlie firm, 
Frank and Tony, Inc. ; the brains of the works, backed l)y 
the most incredible line ever endowed upon a human being. 
The word line describes him in other respects, too. He plays 
on the line on the grid team, and always runs down under 
punts, making a bee-line for the man receiving the ball. He 
uses an awful RepubHcan line on his Democratic major pro- 
fessor. And then there is the eternal line (not the eternal 
triangle this time) between his hang-out at Swarthmorcand 

"Roanoke is a lonelj- city 
Beside the sad, sad sea ; 
And there, wdien college days are o'er, 
My lady waits for me." 





HENRIETTA IDA KELLER 

PHILADELPHIA 

English 

"Yes, I bobbed my hair because I thought I looked too 
sophisticated — and then the comfort! Besides it's rotten to 
turn cartwheels with hairpins falling out all the time. And 
then it gives me such a saintly expression ! No one would- 
dream of the cuss words I know. I thought I'd look like 
Lorna or Kitty Hayes, but some people think I'm simply an 
abridged copy of Greenwich Village. Well, who knows? 
There's an awful lot I don't tell." 



JEAN BERTRAM KNOWLES 

FLUSHING, N. Y. 

Economics 

There is a young vamp from New Yawk, 

And heavens ! but how she can talk. 

She'll argue it through 

Till her face is quite blue, 

This aforesaid young vamp from New Yawk. 

At books she's a regular shark, 

To pull A is for her but a lark; 

But when there's a dance 

She's right there, take a chance, 

As for food, she'll eat dogs till thev bark. 




103 




FREDERICK NORTON LANDON 

TORONTO, CANADA 

Mechanical Engineering 

111 "every class there is at least one "most-married ' man, 
and Nort wins the- honors among our loyal number. We 
have considered the advisability of annually presenting a 
loving-cup to the winner of this "most-married" contest. If 
this were done, Nort's name would go down in history along 
with Fred Donnelly, Det Bronk, and Pard Larkin. 

While his matrimonial venture has occupied much of his 
time, the lone man from Canada still has time to go picture- 
hunting, and many of the best views on these pages are 
products of his skill with the Graflex. 



CHRISTINE LANGHAM LATSHAW 

ROYERSFOKD 

Latin 

"Won't you buy some dee-licious fudge ? Only three for 
five! I have so much work to do (math especially) that you 
just have to buy your fudge, so I can study." 

This is at seven. At eleven, Christine is still selling fudge. 
Not that it isn't wonderful fudge, but they make so much 
of it that money doesn't last so long as it might. Perhaps 
you think you haven't seen Christine so much lately. That's 
because Beatrice has left. It is rumored that they look very 
much alike. 





FRANK HENRY LEMKE 

CHESTER 

Civil Engineering 

We'll have a good opinion of Chester yet, in spite of the 
many ne'er-do-weels* that have come thence, if they send 
us some more like this. Frank has inherited Bartleson's 
reputation as "that Chester day-student," When he was a 
yearling, he got the profs into the habit of giving him A's, 
and. like prohibition, it still stays with them. Frank's favorite 
pastime is worrying about next week's Mech. Lab. report. 
"Just think," says Frank, "that guy Thatcher wants only 
four pages of discussion on this report." Thatcher gets it, 
of course, and Bartleson gives Frank Sigma Tau to keep the 
club in Chester. 

*See Daller's write-up. 



104 



WILLIAM SPROUL LEWIS 

CHESTER 

Ecoiinmics 

Sproul is the senior member of the Chester Four, whose 
wild and wicked doings have only been rivalled in history bj 
the famous Bhiebcard himself. Outside of explaining con- 
tinually that he really isn't the governor of this common- 
wealth, even if he has the same name, he gets along very 
well. After a hectic morning with Dr. Urdahl, he meanders 
to Wharton and, selecting a record suita]5le for his reverie, 
turns on the Vic, and aliandons himself to deep meditations 
as to the. way he will probably spend the afternoon. Shall 
he play bridge with the Four, or tennis with Eddie, or have 
a round of golf at Spring-Haven? But abruptly the Fates, 
in the form of Evans. Clyde, and Benjamin, relieve him of 
the weighty decision by bursting rudely in on his thoughts, 
throttling the Vic. and setting up the bridge apparatus. Then 
Sproul gets up. they draw for partners, pass the cigarettes, 
and that's all there is to it. One more afternoon — gone. 





JOHN CLAMPITT LONGSTRETH 

PHILADELPHIA 

Economics 
Extract from International Encyclopedia, 1945 Edition : 

"Longstreth, John C. (1890-19?i8), American, famous for 
being the laziest man that ever lived. He wound his mantle 
clock every day for twenty-four years, and then, upon dis- 
covering that it was an eight-day clock, he committed sui- 
cide. He was survived by a wife and sixteen children." 



WILLIAM PETER LOWDEN 

PAULSBORO, N. J. 

Chemistry 
Silent Peter, the man of mystery. Rasputin had nothing 
on this fair-haired prodigy from the much-sung region of 
South Jersey. The most that we can gather from his past 
life is that he emigrated from the old country (Finland) at 
the age of twelve years, that he became a loyal member of 
the Legion of St. Paul of Paulsboro, and that he never 
missed Sunday School from the time of his advent at Pauls- 
boro until he came here and had his morals shattered by 
rooming with Sellers for a year. Coupled with this, the fact 
that he refused to take a mug of the stuft that made JNIil- 
waukee famous persuades us that Pete is a man who lives up 
to his convictions. He says that pretzels are strong enough 
for him. 

Pete Sleeps in Wharton and spends the rest of his time 
with Dr. Allenian and Bernard. His fellow chemists, as an 
appreciation of his untiring work in the realm of Chemistry, 
have elected him Royal Keeper of the Atomic Weights. 

105 





CAMPBELL ROGERS McCULLOUGH 

EAST ORANGE, N. J. 

Clicinislry 

Dave Dennisoii thought he would have some joh picking 
a roommate this year as men who are lit to associate with 
Phi Beta Kappa keys don't grow on trees. But Mac made 
good right off the bat when he startled Dave with a true 
analysis of near-beer, a composition that had long baffled the 
health authorities and Dr. AUeman. 

George M. Cohen's onljf rival was the surprise of the sea- 
son when he made his debut in "Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh." 
The missing link was found, and we realized why Mac got 
that three-point so consistently. He's sorry now, for, while 
he might have been taking advantage of his art, he has to 
work, for the profs now seem to realize that his line is 
mostly acting anyway. Why didn't you hold off till next 
year, Mac? 



MARY BLANCHE McMULLEN 

WEST CHESTER 

Englisli 

"Hello! Hello! :^3;»-W? Just a minute, Frank— No, 
Senior Cottage is busy now. If you will wait a minute, I'll 
try again, — Ves, Bill's talking — all right now, go ahead !'' 
Silence — "Secord West? Hello, is Elsa Palmer there? Ithaca 
callin.g — sorry. Chick, all the outside lines are busy now — try 
later." 

. "Yes, Dot, I'm sorry, I'm awfully busy now, but come in 
and sit down. I can talk in a few minutes — Hello ! Second 
West? Hello, is Anne Heafford there? Outside call — I'm 
awfully glad ynu came. Dot, — Herbie Hutchinson just left 
and I was getting lonesome. I'm off at nine — then I have 
three lessons to do, — Init I'll get through somehow." 





BARBARA MANLEY 

PHILADELPHIA 

Chcinislry 

There's no possible way to describe Barbara's laugh — 
you just have to see her do it, and it isn't very hard to ac- 
complish that because she's busy at it most of the time. And 
we marvel at that because she's a Math Major. In astronomy 
Barbara helps Doc jNIiller decide the riddle of the universe, — 
but then she's always ready to explain it in words of one 
syllable to her own admiring satellites. And don't think for 
a minute that Barbara shines by reflected glory alone. 



106 



HAROLD EARL MOORE 

ELIZABETH, N. J. 

Biology 

"Join the army and see the world." Hal was sucked in 
on this outrageous piece of recruiting-poster deception, and 
they sent him down to Florida for two years to catch croco- 
diles, lizards, and girls. He escaped the first two hefore he 
left, but he had the bad hick to pick out a co-ed college, and 
so the poor boy is still afflicted with the latter, although Ik- 
doesn't seem to worry about them much either. 

Having left the army, and dropped engineering, Hal liad 
to find some other form of recreation, so he joined the In- 
strumental Club, and is now knowi) as Old Man Dolin him- 
self. 





JOSEPHINE LAWYER MOORHEAD 

RUTLEDGE 

French 
"Come on, Jo, it's time for class." 
"All right, but wait till I get something to eat." 
And with a sandwich firmly grasped in each hand, she 
starts for class and, gets there on time, too. She doesn't 
look noisy, does she? But when she gives us grand opera 
"a la Caruso," and when she giggles ; well, everything stops 
until she is exhausted. 



AUGUSTINE F. S. MUSANTE 

WEST CHESTER 

Clicinicat Eiigiiwering 

Augustine St. Francis is our latest arrival from the 
Monastery of St. DuPont. The jovial monk is at present 
engaged in the pursuit of alcheniistic knowledge over by 
Whittier House. Anyone visiting his room and noting the 
numerous flasks containing dark, mysterious substances will 
admit that he looks as if he were going to know something 
to teach the brothers of his order before he retires to the 
convent. That person will also admit the sanity of picking 
a room so close to the fire-escape. 

Like all monks, Augustine must have his fun. So, when 
he's feeling humorous, he likes to hook up his door-knob to 
a spark-coil and invite ye fresh to enter. The results are 
startling and would be appreciated if — he would confine his 
joke to the lowly fresh. 




107 




DOROTHY PATTEN NASSAU 

PHILADELPHIA 

English 

"Mello. seen Dot anywhere around? Well, where is she 
anway? I haven't seen her for days, seems to me. Oh, that's 
so — that Inter-class Gym meet comes off today, doesn't it? 
Of course Dot would go over there and practice her old 
head off, when she knows she's one of the best anyhow ; at 
least everyone else does. Did you ever see anyone like 
her? — Gym, basketball, hockey, Y. W., and a B average be- 
sides? Pity there aren't more worlds to conquer. Well, I'm 
off — if you see Dot, tell her there's a special meeting of 
Exec tonight." 



JESSE NEVYAS 

WEST CHESTER 

Ecoiwtnics 

Some people have a college education given to them, while 
others earn it. Jess certainly qualifies for the latter class. 
Any man who gets up at six o clock, and takes the :38 train 
out of West Chester in order to make a first-hour class earns 
his degree without further c|ualifications. He belongs to the 
silent legion who does all the work of the world and re- 
ceives no credit for it. Brother Jake was and is a chemist, 
and Jess started out to follow his example, but being late 
for supper every night at home was too much, so now Jess 
is one of the myriad of converts to economy. 





WARREN HARVEY OGDEN 

BOOTHWYN 

Chcinislry 

Joe Gum, alias Gyp, alias Curley broke into Hicksite so- 
ciety when Brother Johnny was breaking in freshmen. 
Family ties were no barrier, so Gyp was broken in with due 
ceremony ; for the vengeance of the small is often wreaked 
upon the unassuming relations of the great. 

You've read about the country boy who came to college 
and showed "them city fellers" how to do things, and aston- 
ished the co-eds by total abstinence from their society. 
Curley did all these things : and, outside of beating Prince- 
ton and scoring on Penn, he gave the rest of the team little 
chance to do anything except fill out the required number 
of players. 



108 



ELSA PALMER 

FANWOOD, N. J. 

Electrical Engineering 
Name — Elsa Palmer. 
Major Subject — Engineering. 
Qnalifications — 

1. Can engineer more than machines and figures. 

2. Can engineer honor connnittee of student govern- 

ment. 

3. Engineers hockey stick even better than a slide-rule. 
N. B. — It is rumored that she is, very much interested in 

engineering at Cornell. 





PUM KOO PARK 

OAHU, HAWAII 

Biology 

"Which I wish to remark, 

And my language is plain. 
That, for ways that are dark 
And tricks that are vain. 
This Swarthmore Koree is peculiar." 
Which is what Hutchinson said, when, in that celebrated 
poker game of December third last. Jazz Pusey pushed Parks' 
chair over, and Park with it, and four aces fell out of his 
sleeve. But that's a minor detail. Pum Kn-ku is Doc Trot- 
ter's alibi at present. He superintends biology lab, and the 
cutting up of frogs, lizards, cats. etc. (Ask Miss Culin's 
kitty). 



PIP SPOTSWOOD POLLARD 

SWARTHMORE 

Chasing Sticks 

There always will be arguments about the supremacy of 
the classes. Well, we can lay claim to the honor of being 
the first class to number a real, honest-to-goodness dog among 
its members. Pip has been our constant companion for three 
years, and hasn't flunked out yet. 

In the older days, we knew him only as an attache of 
Robert Spotswood's, but Pip found the finding of friends 
a very simple matter indeed, and his circle of acquaintances 
has grown until it almost eclipses that of his relative. 




- ♦ 



109 




^mmm 






— ti — 

M 





LM@0 



ACE HIGH 




FULL HOUSE 




FLUSH 




BLUFF 




110 



ROBERT SPOTSWOOD POLLARD 

SWARTHMORE 

Mefhviical Engineering 

This year lie decided lo room with us, a further proof of 
the breaking-away process which has characterized Spots' 
activity on the Hill. In the good old days, the only way 
you could tell he was around was by seeing his dog. His 
fall has been gradual but steady, and then there is Media. 
There is something aliout that place that appeals to Spot. 
Perhaps he is scientifically inclined, or has an idea of civic 
beauty — who knows? Even his dog takes Friday and Sat- 
urday night trips with him to the county seat. 





WILLIAM POWELL 

PHILADELPHIA 

Greek 

Billy Sunday has done so well in his chosen field that this 
Bill is thinking seriously of an attempt to do likewise. Bill 
expects to be a regular preacher some day. Just now he"s 
practicing ; spends time in Miss Meeteer's Greek classes, 
wears that solemn look, and works out every Sunday on the 
people in hospitals and penal institutions around Philly. 
Poor people — how they nnist suffer; our hearts truly go out 
to them in sympathy. 

We suppose he will some day assume the letters D.D. 
after his name. We know two words they will stand for 
and one isn't Doctor — but we are not telling anyone. See the 
1021 Halcyon or ask someone who accompanied him to the 
Columbia game, then form your own opinion. 



WILLIAM JOSEPH POWNALL 

COATESVILLE 

Ecoiwiiiies 

Here is the man who wanted to bet in his Freshman year 
that he would never learn to dance. We should have taken 
him up, it would have financed this Halcyon. Brute is Bax- 
ter's only rival in the automobile game, though Ler.x dis- 
claims the rivalry, for one cannot compare a Peerless with a 
Chevrolet, 

Wonder why he stays around college these days? Has he 
.become acclimated, has the attraction in Coatesville lost its 
magnetism, or what? 




Ill 




IRENE ELIZABETH REMS 

PHILADELPHIA 

Gci'iiian 

Irtne is the girl who is always doing sonietliing for some- 
liody else and her lessons ahead of time. She starts the day 
liy stealthily carrying out a muffin for some late sleeper. 
Virtue hrings its own rewards, all right, for Irene has a 
wonderful drag with the Dean (of Women). Perhaps that 
is why her news is always up-to-date. Her chiefest form 
of distinction, however, comes through her heing the only 
one in our class or, so far as we can tell, in the college with 
enough ambition to major with Mrs. Nev port. It is said, 
though it does not apply here, that fools walk in where angels 
fear to tread. 



FRANCES VIRGINIA RUNK 

PHILIPSBURG 

English 

Frances is an awfully comforting person to have around. 
Whenever you feel in a contradictory mood, just stay with 
her for a while: she'll soon say something you can jump at, 
whether it's a question of whom Shaw considers a super- 
man, or whether you ought to knit on Sundays. She'll stick 
to her point in such a serious, unofifending way that you'll 
soon work your grouch off on her. 

She's a student in Dutch expressions, as, for example : 
"Isn't it a shame that you have to be a senior your last year 
in college?" She's the girl you can depend on to play the 
violin between the acts of plays, or get together a sextette 
to sing Christmas carols in Collection. As the sign on the 
window of the Victor store says, she's "Everj'thing Musical." 





LOIS RYAN 

FOREST GROVE 

Latin 

She learns her lessons every day : 
Her duty ne'er she shirks. 
She even stays up late at night 
To watch the stars at work. 

But when it comes to matinees, 
This lady's always there ; 
For, though she's fond of learning. 
She wants "music in the air.'' 

Some say she's very ciuiet, 
But here's a secret true : 
Don't ever get her started, 
Or she never will get through. 



112 



MARIAN WILLIS SATTERTHWAITE 

TKENTON, N. J. 

Efonoinics 

"Hello! Is that you, Walton? I've got the girls' write- 
ups, after all our stewing. I had to do most of them myself 
last night and I was dead-tired, too. * * * * Went to a Phi 
Delt table-party, and had to come back early for an exec 
meeting. I had a fiendish e.xani in Politics today, but 1 
trusted to luck, and I guess I staggered through all right, 
because I'm the only Democrat in the class. 

"No, I haven't seen Aphrodite. * * * * Surely, I'd love 
to go! * * * ''' No, next week-end I'm going down to An- 
napolis. * '^' * ''' No, that's the ni.ght of the Kappa Sigma 
dance. * * * * Week after? All right. 

"By the way, has anyone given you a write-up for me ? 
* * * * Have they? * * * * Well, please don't let anything 
go through about my sitting under an umbrella at the table 
the night election bets were paid ofif * * * * Well, I'm sure 
glad those write-ups are done. * * ■* * Good-bye." 





RUTH SATTERTHWAITE 

LANGHORNE 

English 

D is for dimples and also demure, 

I is for impishness, seldom but sure, 

M is for meekness, as everyone knows, 

P is for pretty, but never for pose. 



ELIZABETH TAYLOR SELLERS 

SWARTHMORE 

Ilnglish 

There are several celebrated names in our class, such as 
Keller, Palmer, and Wood, all of which appear daily in the 
newspapers. Betty is another one of these celebrities and 
one of the best Sellers we have. She first became famous 
as Lucretia Mott on Founder's Day. Even Prexy had an 
extra heart throb that day and had to look twice to make 
sure that the stately form he saw was not the great lady 
herself. 

She appears to be a living example of the quiet, un- 
sophisticated, gentle Quakeress. But "never believe the news- 
papers my son." Ask Wid. 




113 




HARRY McKINLEY SELLERS 

POTTSVILLE 

Chemistiy 

We couldn't think of anything that would really do jus- 
tice to Harry so we looked him up in the International En- 
cyclopaedia, and here is what we found : 

"Laughing Jackass, a species of kingfisher found on the 
streams of Central Pennsylvania. It has a red crest to dis- 
tinguish it from the ordinary type, and receives its name 
from the peculiar, gurgling cry uttered with great regularity 
at dawn and dusk, and at meal-times." 



PAUL SHARPLESS 

WESTBURY, L. I., N. Y. 

Cheiniral Engineering 

"Say fellows, I'm going down town. We had a punk 
dinner tonight, and I'm feeling rotten. Guess I'll stay down 
over night and get a good breakfast. You can have my ciuilt 
if Heinie doesn't beat you to it." And Paul toddles off, re- 
turning just in time to miss Collection, but not too late to 
tell the whole second-hour class of myriads of hot cakes, 
sausages, etc., with which he has gorged himself in the ef- 
fort to attain a rotundity like Val's. 

As an interior decorator, Paul uses up several room de- 
posits every year. Miss Yardley keeps a chart of the dirty 
spots and nail holes in his walls, in order to exact the proper 
tribute. Perhaps this is the avenue through which he will 
become immortal, because the walls of scores of Wharton 
rooms are embellished with his flourishing signature. 





HOWARD KNOTT SHAW 

TRENTON, N. J. 

Economics 

The steamroller, with his seductive line, recalls to us the 
villain in Lady Fanny's Memoirs who was won't to lure un- 
suspecting maidens into questionable soda-fountains. It has 
been a matter of great conjecture what he whispers to the 
numerous freshman girls that he entices into the shadows of 
the post-office. 

But there should be no confusion of this person and the 
sophomore Shaw. Steamroller is the one who goes gadding 
a1)out on week-ends while Moon stavs at home to keep house. 
Occasionally Howard gets the Wanderlust, and no one knows 
whether it will lead him to .^kron. or to visit a friend in 
Washington to see the sights on F Street. For a while in 
January he didn't do any gadding, though. He had to get 

out "those d junior write-ups," Well, here they are, but 

he's still ku-ku with after effects. 



114 



ELEANOR ANNA SHINN 

SWARTHMORE 

Chcinislry 

C P Tho A III La 

(her) (ull) se z B 

Wat H R Luck G 

ch e y (ess) 

Then You S T R Y 

(11) ee he (eson) 

WE A L Y S. O. S. ! 

1 (ell) 





EDITH IMLAY SILVER 

PHILADELPHIA 

English 

Silver is hef name, and her sterling qualities are very 
evident. Quiet, but always ready with her smile, and to 
leave for Philly after Saturday collection. Firm in her opin- 
ions, staunch in her friendships, and proud of the distinction 
of being one of the few girls in college with naturally (!!!) 
(Mercelles, please note) curly hair. 



MATILDA SIMPSON 

DARBY 

French 

Dear me, suz ! You'd never think to look at her that 
Matilda was the girl who yelled in the library, vamped her 
way into the dining-room one night, ran her Ford down the 
asphaltum, or who is a prominent figure at the Darby Fire- 
men's Carnival. And yet Matilda thinks she fools us by 
keeping very quiet, and looking very deep, or as Sig puts it, 
Sphinx-like. But Matilda herself often says, "You can't al- 
wavs sometimes tell!' 




115 




RICHARD WILLIAM SLOCUM 

READING 

Political Science 

i).P. M.— "Much work tonight, Dick?" 

"No, just Doc Brooks, Greek, about a hundred pages for 
Doc Goddard, and a Phoenix story, that's all — Oh, yes, and 
then there are a couple of letters I must write.'' Little won- 
der that Dick holds the college record for burning the mid- 
night oil. 

His political leanings are wholly Republican, much to the 
despair of his major prof. He is an embryo lawyer, a fin- 
ished politician, and his line never wavers, be it vocal or 
typewritten. 



EDWARD RICHARD SMITH 

GLEN COVE, N. Y. 

Ciz'il Engineering 

Eddie is a railroad "moggot" because the only writing 
necessary for the position is the signing of one's name to 
a pass, and he says the conductors can't read anyway, so 
what's the difference ? 

Have you ever wondered where all the new ties come 
from around the Hill? Ask Eddie. And, if ever you want 
to borrow one of these, or need a five spot or a hat, or if 
you're hungry and are lacking in the exchange medium de- 
sired by Grobert and Dudley Inc., see Eddie. He has all 
these things and more. But whether he is generous enough 
to appreciate this advertisement of his generosity is some- 
thing we haven't been aisle to determine. 





ELSIE ISABEL SMITH 

NEW YORK CITY 

Elsie is one of our most regular runners to the 1 :29. 
What she and Vera find to do in town is more than we can 
guess, but it must be more darned fun, if you can judge by 
the peals of laughter they emit coming up the asphaltum. 
We think Elsie ought to go in the movies herself instead 
of merely looking on — anyone with two big blue eyes like 
hers is wasting her talents at college — though we know sev- 
eral gentlemen who might not agree with this. How 'bout 
it, Howard? 



116 



JOHN COLBOURNE SMITH 

CHESTER 

Chemical Engineering 

Johnny is another migratory hird of the Chester variety. 
He crosses the trestle every morning, and drops in the bacl< 
way of Wharton just in time to get to a first-hour class. No, 
not just in time for collection, for he is still an engineer, one 
of that ever-decreasing tribe that does the work of the world 
and receives little of the credit. But even Johnny may drop 
by the wayside some day and become an economist. 

In the spring, he stays here all afternoon in order to dem- 
onstrate his ability at lacrosse. He hopes to make a letter 
some time, if all the present team either graduate or become 
ineligible. 





JOHN LEECH STAINTON 

CHESTER 

Economics 

Smiles interspersed with frowns make us wonder whether 
"The Kid" was ever in love. H he has been, he never got 
over it entirely, but affections aren't the only things re- 
sponsible for his moody nature. Johnnie was hugelj' disap- 
pointed this summer when he was over at the Metropolis on 
a pleasure excursion. He wanted to see the Mardi Gras at 
Coney Island — rather, she did — but the unobliging trolley 
men in Brooklyn had picked on that week for a practical 
demonstration of the way they could oppose public wishes 
and convenience at will. "The Kid" wasn't strong on walk- 
ing, so — but thereby hangs a tale. 



GEORGE WOODBRIDGE STEWART 

OZONE PARK, N. Y. 

Economics 

The first thing we heard about George was that he came 
from the big city. That brought visions of "Thoity-thoid 
Street," etc., so we investigated. Disappointment lurked in 
B section and met us at the door. The fact is, George 
wouldn't talk for pulilication (the well-known clam was a 
Vic compared to him). But Unk saved the day when he 
walked in and asked George what he thought of Ducky's 
latest theory about the authentis-issity of the scriptures. This 
was a starter, and the Wliartou authority on matters re- 
ligious stood revealed to us. He stormed right, left, up and 
down ; he could not contain himself, and there's no telling 
what might have happened to us had we not departed to the 
cracker-room for safety. 




117 



ARTHUR LIPPINCOTT STILES 

MOORESTOWN, N. J. 

Electrical Engineering 

To tlie uninitiated, Art's cliief aim in the world seems to 
be tlie perfection of the disappearing act. That is, of course, 
outside of classes; for no one can accuse him pulling off 
such an act in class. His multitudinous "A's" bear witness 
to this fact. But, to those who are privileged to know him 
better, each disappearance is an indication of some scientilic 
discovery in the making. He is either "wirelessing" with 
St. Augustine of West Chester, or having a iittle fun over 
in the physics lab. But his biggest honors have been won 
with his vest-pocket camera. The results are small at first, 
but then he has them enlarged, and you couldn't tell them 
from the products of the finest Graflex. Some of the best 
views in this book are the products of his "disappearing acts." 





ELIZABETH DENNING STRANG 

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. 

Frcncli 

Betty hadn't been around college a week before \\t 
liegan to hear queries from the male contingent as to the 
identity of that good-looking girl with the curly black hair 
and the kippy clothes. Speaking of hair, we are tempted to 
wonder in what mediaeval state of barbaric fashion Swarth- 
niore's coiffures would now be were it not for Betty's mod- 
ern "uplift" movement. 

But, well-known as she is in this respect, it is the Betty who 
never fails to smile, who is always ready to press your dress, 
or to lend you a hat when you can t find your own. who has 
made the warm spot which is hers in the heart of Swarth- 
more. 



WILLIAM THOMSON TAYLOR 

OGONTZ 

Economics 

This is the name his parents gave hint when he was young 
and helpless, but his classmates have been more considerate. 
He is now known as "Slats" because of his length and thin- 
ness. The co-eds call him "that tall boy with his hair parted 
on the side." His greatest trial occurred last year in analyt, 
when Doc Miller said that all the clever remarks came from 
Taylor and the otherwise from Sharpless, adding, "I can't 
tell you two twins apart." Slats is a great fusser, but has 
never been known to have two dates with the same girl. But 
having this great variety has educated him to their wants 
and needs, and his long arms stand him in good stead. 

Bill started out as a hard-working engineer ; but he had 
some scarlet fever last spring, and, being fairly certain he 
would never again have such a .good excuse, he joined the 
economics gang on the spot. 




119 




RUTH MARTHA THOMPSON 

KENNETT SQUARE 

Frcncli 

Ruth rounded the first lap of the race to fame when the 
P.ihle came out, and is still plugging along. You may get 
tired of hearing that, "She's a dandy all-around sport," but 
you never get tired of what it describes. Ruth can shoot 
up and down the hockey field in the class games like a streak, 
and still reserve some of her speed to help get the Phoenix 
out on time. Even after that, she takes time off to make 
some mighty good sandwiches and still better friends. 



HELEN MARIA THORNE 

MOORESTOWN, N. J. 

English 

''Hello, people! What's going on? Oh, I've been run- 
ning around all afternoon, helping people get to the train, 
and keeping those sophs from bothering the life out of the 
poor freshies, and getting acquainted with all the new-ar- 
rivals, and now I have hockey in a few minutes. And think 
of all I've got to do tonight, besides finishing that novel 1 
started. Well, s'long, I've got to hurry." 





DOROTHY REID VARIAN 

GULPH, BRIDGEPORT 

Biology 

She has the very finest points. 

Although she's but a dot ; 
She may seem meek and quiet, but 

You'll like her quite a lot. 

And then, you see, she loves to read, 
(Her middle name, you know) ; 

And when she streaks by in her Ford, 
You'll see she's not so slow. 



120 



WINNIE MILLER WEIHENMAYER 

PHILADELPHIA 

Biology 

Lives of great men all remind us, etc. — and Winnie reminds 
us of Edison, because she lives in the laboratory and sleeps 
about five hours out of the twenty-four; of Fred Stone, be- 
cause she can be such a fool and get away with it ; of a 
mufifled drum, because she does lots of work without much 
noise; of Edith Evans, because she displays such rare tact 
and laughs at all Fred Wiese's jokes; and of Jeff Davis, be- 
cause she thinks that the South produces the only real men 
in the Union. 





CAROLIEN HAYES WHITE 

ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

Eiiglisli 

Carolien had a pair of boots, which she used to hike to 
all the football games. Always fond of mud scows, she called 
one Kate and the other Duplicate. There may have been two 
of a kind as far as the goloshes were concerned, but we defy 
anyone to dig up another specimen like their owner. 

Man-the-life-boats, she's the skipper of one class and 
knows more "naughtical" terms than we care to print. She 
was the girls' cheer Leader and at times even led Y. W. 
She admits herself that she is a product of co-education 
and therefore a good argument for it, but doesn't like to be 
kissed, which last proves absolutely that you can't dupli-Kate. 



MORISSA WALN WILLIAMS 

GLENOLDEN 

French 
Scene — Third East. 
Time — Sunday Evening. 
Dramatis Persona? — Room-mate, Former room-mate, Former 

room-mate's room-mate. 
Enter F. R. M.— "Hello— Ez back yet ?" 
R. M. — "Nope — but soon will be. Sit down." 
Enter the others — Chorus — "Gosh, I didn't go to supper 

at all." 
Gnawing silence. (Slow step heard in the hall, some one 

fumbles at door knob, door opens and in strolls Morissa 

with only one suitcase— Deep gloom). 
Morissa — "Gee, you look cheerful — Glad to see me, aren't 




you : 



Well, you talk to Thornie — Fm busy. 



Silence — (Faint whisper of "Food" — and with one of her dry 

remarks, Ezra kicks her suitcase toward them). 
■"Here, eat — only don't bother me." 

(Crunching, cake crumbs, curtain). 

121 




MERLE MARIE WOOD 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 

Philosoj^hy 

"Wh)', hello honey! Do come in. Heah, sit in the cliair. 
* * Yes, I'm going in on the 1 :29 with Kath'n and Robin. * * 
Oh, Hectah's pup !" And Merle Marie rummages among the 
remnants for the hatpin that speared the olives at last night's 
meeting of the terrible trio. 

Dances, parties, plays — "Mmm, ah suah do like them !" 
But she's no frivolous young thing. Forget not the gray 
matter required to read one's Plato in Greek, do college in 
three years, and major with Ducky, even though you can help 
things along with penutche. And, as for phone-calls, third- 
west thinks she might just as well camp out right under the 
telephone. 



META DOUGLASS YARNALL 

YEADON 

English 

Meta is famous for her Sunday evening teas when she and 
lier motlier's pantry come back to college after a prosperous 
week-end. But wliile we don't allow her food to last long, 
her generosity certainly does, even to lending hair-nets and 
sweaters. Speaking of hair-nets reminds us — Meta hates 
rainy days because she says they're too expensive. Why? 
Don't tell me you never heard of that adorable man on Chest- 
nut Street who does Marcelles ! 





RUSSELL ATLEE YARNALL 

SWARTHMORE 

Economics 

And now. ladies and gents, we invite your attention to 
the last and, may we say, greatest of our exhibition in the 
"Rogues' Gallery." Examine his features closely, and you 
will find delineated there a better tale than man can tell. He 
is as full of pep as he looks, and twice as good-natured. 

Russ spent quite some time in the Big Show across the 
water, and we have it straight that he chased a regiment of 
the Royal Frankfurters so fast that their pockets dipped 
sand. At any rate, he didn't miss much ; he even keeps some 
shrapnel sewed up in his anatomy for safe keeping. 

That same fight he has put into football for the Garnet. 
Among our most treasured memories are pictures of Rusty 
making history for Swarthmore. Who can forget how he 
broke awav for the first touchdown against Columbia, and 



122 




123 



TEx-^tlembers of 1922 



Frank Ainsworth, *2 K 

Agnes Marv Albright 

Ida Elizabeth Alvino 

John Bryant Barker 

Julian Wilson Barnard 

William Lord Battersbv, K :i 

Walter Thewlis Bew, $ K * 

Sarah Ingram Boreman, K K r 

Elizabeth Currey Brackin 

Katherine Westcott Briegel 

Louise Rhinelander Brown 

Elizabeth Burris, K A 

Sarah Sheppard Butler 

Edward Lambert Campbell, K 5 

James Fenton Carter, 4> A © 

Norman Harvey Collisson, K 2 

Henry Fred Colvin 

Sarah Long Cook, K A © 

David Evans Cooper 

Delma Gertrude P. Crensitaw 

Margaret Culin. AT 

Virgil Homer Dassel 

Daniel Landis Detwiler, AY 

Pemberton Morris Dickson,, K 2 

George Joseph Diggins, Jr. 

Margaret Verna Doty 

John Doyle 

Harold Enos Dufendacit 

Dorothy Margaret Durbin 

Norman Firman Esibill, A Y 

George Frank Esslinger, K 2 

William Anthony Gaito, * 2 K 

Edith Elizabeth Gatchell 

Grace Carol Gibbs 
* Deceased 



Mildred Elizabeth Grim, $ M 

Alfred Baynard Gundlack, K 2 

Howard Lippincott Haines, Jr., "1> A 

Gladys Christine Haldeman, AT 

Charles Beverly Hannum 

Ellis Marshall Harvey, Jr., $ A © 

Ellen Russell Hayes, K K r 

Bertha Campf Hettinger 

Herman William Horn 

Helen Elizabeth Horner, a r 

Morris Herman Horowitz 

Mary Clothier FIull 

Miriam Alice Hutton 

William Paxon Johnson, 2*E 

Florence Alline Jones, K A © 

Gabriel Louis Kaplan 

Albert Washburn Kelsey 

William Henry' Kinkead, Jr., K2 

Hannah E. Kirk 

HuLDA Jones Kirk, n B * 

Beatrice Angeline Latsitaw 

Wilkin Lillibridge Lauer 

Olin White Lippincott, $ K * 

Dorothy Josephine Little 

Dorothy- Lottridge 

Helen May Lutes 

*George Barrows McClellan, K 2 

OVIATT McCoNNELL 

Lawrence Joseph McEvoy, $ A 
Edward Francis McGinley, Jr., ATA 
Lucius Burgess Merriam 
Elizabeth Roberts Miller, K K r 
Philippa Richards Moffatt 
N.^thaniel Beals Moldawer 

124 



Charles Louts Reed M'.-ers, Jr. 
Edna Ruth Newton 
Wesley Richard O'Neill, Jr. 
Margaret Pen nock 
Francis Osborne Pouchot, * 2 K 
Allen Leon Putnam 
Elizabeth Isabella Ralston 
William Clarence Reese 
James Reuben Rickert, * 2 K 
AiLEEN Riley 

Florence Marguerite Rose 
Edward Jackson Rutter 
Richard Grafflin Sagebeer 
Joseph Paul Schlicker, $ K * 
Archie Truog Schreiber 
Walter Andrew Schulz 
Irma Schwatt, $ M 
Ewald Henry Schwengel 
Anna Elizabeth Shannon, TI B <I> 
Henry' Mace Sharp 
Kenneth Alfonces Sharp 
Elizabeth Colwell Smith, KKT 
Gordon Smith, K 2 
William Newell Sparks, A Y 

Myra 



Sarah Marshall Stap.ler, K A (-) 
MnuAM Gertrude Stackhouse 
Margaret Stewart, K A (4 
Ernest Mood^' Straubel 
John D. Taggert 
Edith Colquhoun Taylor 
Charles La^'mon Terry, Jr., <I> 2 K 
Axel Febiger PL Tsakonas 
Florence Wood Twining, K A © 
Harry Edward Walker, * K * 
Elizabeth Ann Walter, K A 
William Pettit Ware, K 2 
Marion Shoemaker Warner 
Frances Wellington, nB$ 
PIarriet Wetzel 
John Wilmot Whittier, $A0 
Francis Dale Wickersham, $ A © 
Florence Marshall Wildman, K A © 
Robert Morgan Williamson 
Elizabeth Beatrice Wills 
Malcolm Rose Wise 
James Ralph Wright 
WiLLiAJi Carleton Young 
Charles Rollin Zane 
Jeanne Zeiser 




125 








126 




327 




128 





ALLEN P. WILLIS 



RICHARD J. CORNELL 



Sophomore (Tlass Officers 

Allen P. Willis - - President - - Richard J. Cornell 

Lewis S. Avars - - Vice President - Wallace R. Linton 

Anna S. Roberts - - Secretary - Margaret L. Stafford 

Ferdinand L. Nofer - Treasurer - - Walter C. Pusey 





ANNA ROBERTS 



MARGARET STAFFORD 



129 



Members of tl)e (Tlass of 1923 

John Charles Adams __.-..__ Lansdowiie 

Julia Alice Alexander. AT, Biology - - - - - Swarthmore 
Augusta Allen, n B *, Ecoiioiiiics 39 Westervelt Ave., Plainfiekl, N. J. 

Elizabeth Jarrett Anderson. II B $, History, 1 W. JMontgomery Ave., .\rdmore 
Marv Evelyn Arnold, French - - 4149 North Broad St., Philadelphia 
Lester Asplundh, * K "t, Mcch. Eng. ----- Bryn Athyn 
Eleanor Roselynd Atherholt, K K r, English Greystone, West Chester 

Lewis Sims Avars, Jr., AY, Mcch. Eng. - - - - Alloway, N, J. 
Emma Louise Bailey, French - - 99 Broad Street, Charleston, S. C. 

Albert Edmund Baker, Economics 
Edwin Scobie Baker, $ 2 K, Economics 
Bodine Brinton Barrett, Chcni. Eng. 
Susannah George Beurv, A r. Biology 
Sara Elizabeth Bitler, A r, Biology 



522 Brown Ave., Hagerstown, 'Sid. 

739 Beaver St., Sewickley 

Norwood 

r 3216 N. 16th St.. Philadelphia 

Rutledge 

- Ordrossan Park, West Chester 

224 Chester Road, Swarthmore 

25 St. Paul's Road, Ardmore 

- 1622 29th St., Washington, D. C. 
6300 Green St., Germantown 

- 106 Atlantic St., Bridgeton, N. J. 



Anne Guisse Bockius. English 

Jean Elizabeth Bond, n B <I>, French 

Eleanor Esther Boyd, * M, English 

Elsie Palmer Brown, A r, French 

Margaret Byrd, Pol. Science - 

Marjorie Reeves Campbell 

Erances Sar.\h Carter, n B <I>, Mathematics 

127 E. Washington St., Haddont^eld. N. J. 
Paul LaEorge Clark, $ A ©, Biology - 19 W. Washington St., Media 

Kathrvn Elizabeth Cleckner, n B *, English 1530 Green St., Harrisburg 
Dorothy Clendenning, Chemistry - 125 E. Washington Lane, Germantown 
John Edward Clyde, * K ^, Mcch. Eng. - - 613 E. 14th St., Chester 

James Alexander Coceirane, Jr., * K *, English 402 E. 13th St., Chester 
William West Conrad ----- 1014 DeKalb St., Norristown 
Richard Janne'S' Cornell, K 2, Elec. Eng. Green Ave., Lawrenceville, N. J. 



George Julian »Courtney, AY, Chem. Eng. 
Hope Cox, Econon\jcs - - - - - 
Cornelia Duntley Coy, Economics 
ALvRGARET Ruth Crocker, X n. Economics 
Caroline Shortlidge Darlington, English 
Margaret Verna Doty, Latin 

130 



- 624 W. 6th St., Chester 

Chappaqua, N. Y. 

Evanston, 111. 

315 Huron Ave., Sheboygan, Wis. 

Darling 
65 E. State St., Montpelier, Vt. 



•* r m^ k 



George Livingston Earnshaw, $ K * Mech. Eiig. 

182 Bellevue Ave., Upper Montclair, N. J. 
Louis Robert Enslin, $ K >!', Economics - 3818 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 
Frances Marjorie Eves, Mathematics - 62 Pierrepont St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Louise Goldsborough Firmin, Mathematics _ _ _ _ Glenside 

IsABELLE Shaw Fussell, K K r, English - - 421 Lyceum Ave., Roxborough 
Samuel Brecht Gaumer, K2, Pol., Science 518 Columbia Ave., Lansdale 

Frances Elizabeth Gillespie, 11 B <I>, French _ . . Swarthmore 

Ned Sherry Hankins, AY, Pol. Sciene: 322 Sassafras St., Millville, N. J- 

Ralf Lee Hartwell, K 2, Chemistry - _ _ _ Burlington, Vt. 

Katherine Russell Hayes, a r, English - - - - Swarthmore 

Margaret Laurie Hayes, KKT, English 436 N. Church St., West Chester 
Marlon Carleton Hinebaugh, $2K, Biology - - - C)akland, i\Id. 

Alice Rebecca Hoagland, $ M - - 20 Barren Ave., Woodbridge, N. J. 
Henrv Bover Hoff, Biology __---_- Lykens 

Henry Manly Howell, A Y, Chcm. Eug. 120 W. McNeal St., Millville, N. J. 
Louise Buhler Huff, AT- - Hotel Marie Antoinette, New York City 
Collwyn Kennedy Humphreys, $ K *, Economics - - Easton, Md. 



Ann Elizabeth Johnson, KKT 
William West Joyce, * A ®, Chemistry - 
Walter Barker Keighton, Jr., Chcm. Eug. 
Mary Elizabeth Kemp, Latin 
Clarence Philip Kistler, <I> K 'I', Biology - 
William Thomas Knowles, K 2, Economics 
LaTelle McKee LaFollette, <I> 2 K, Mech. 
Herbert Francis Lambrecht, Chem. Eng. 

LSI 



38 Henry St., Bridgeton, N. J. 
Swarthmore 

- - - - Swarthmore 

Federalsburg, Md. 

- 200 E. State St., Nanticoke 
808 Adams St., Wilmington, Del. 

Eng. - Charleston, W. Ya.. 
- ' - - Belleville, N. T- 




132 



William Newton Landis,, <!> A ®, Engineering - 509 Yale Ave., Swarthmore 
Elizabeth Frederica Lanning, AT - - - - Merchantville, N. J. 

Lawrence Bosler Lewis, Civil Mng. - - - - - - Ogontz 

William Atherton Limberger, * A ®, Biology, 301 S. Church St., We.st Chester 
Wallace Ross Linton, K2, Mech. Eng. - 6404 N. 7th St., Philadelphia 

Martha Pancoast Lippincott, A r, English - 77 Broadway, Salem, N. J. 
Frank Clark Long, <I>K*, Mech. Eng. - - 155 Valley St., Lewi.stown 
John Raymond McCain, *K*, Economics - - 320 E. 15th St., Chester 
AIary Ann Todd McCall, X Q, English - 815 Adams St., Wilmington, Del 
Margaret McClintock, English ------ Swarthmore 

Samuel Harold McConnell, * 2 K, Mech. Eng. - - Honey Brook 

Gertrude Malz, Latin ------- Williamson School 

Howard Davis Merion, Chemistry ------- Ward 

George Myrick, Jr., $ 2 K, Mech. Eng. - - 1043 69th Ave., I'hiladelphia 
Ferdinand Leslie Nofer, K 2, Chemistry 1019 S. 51st St., Philadelphia 

Barbara Ruth Olinger -------- Swarthmore 

Marjorie Onderdonk, Chemistry - 256 Garfield Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Helen Cowperthwaite Osler, Latin - - - - Merchantville, N. J. 

Elizabeth Comly Palmer, Mathematics - - - - - Primes 

Mary Darlington Palmer, Latin - - - 55 Price Ave., Lansdowne 

Helen Parrott, X n, Economics - - 6603 Lawnton -A.ve., Oak Lane 

William Hall Paxson, Chcm. Eng. ----- Swarthmore 

Kathryn Pflaum, K a O, Chemistry - - 3539 N. 21st St., Philadelphia 

Clarence Gayton Postlethwaite, Chein. Eng. 

142 Hamilton Ave., New Rochelle, X. Y. 
Joseph ITarlan Powell, * 2 K, Mech. Eng. - - - - Downingtown 

Ruth Elizabeth Pownall, X n. History ----- Swarthmore 

John Malcolm Pratt, "t A ®, Chein. Eng. 305 N. High St., West Chester 

Albert Welding Preston, Jr., * 2 K, Civil. Eng., 132 Rutgers Ave., Swarthmore 
Walter Carroll Pusey, Jr., Chem. Eng. - 2108 Thorpes Lane, Germantown 
Edgar Meyer Rauh, Chemistry - - 11310 Bellflower Rd., Cleveland, O. 
Henr'i' DiEiiL Rentschler, Biology ------ Ringtown 

Helen Mae Rigby, $ M, History - - - - 122 E. 5th St., Media 

Andrew Bickley Ritter, AY, Cheiii. Eng. 6509 N. Park Ave., Philadelphia 
Anna Satterthwaite Roberts, K A ®, Biology - - - Wallingford 
Alban Eavenson Rogers. A Y, Elec. Eng. 49 Grove St., Asheville, X. C. 

David Rose, $ 2 K, Chem. Eng. - - - - Bfookhaven, Chester 

Joseph Daniel Rowley, $ a 0, Elec. Eng. - - - Chincoteague. \'a. 

John Fell Ruckman --------- Lahaska 

133 



Walter Scott Rumble, Mccli. Eiig. ------ Rutledge 

Charles Regnier Russell. $ A ®, Mcch. Eng. - - - Swarthmore 
Edward Jackson Rutter, Civil Eng. ------ Glenolden 

Rena Sprague Sharples, KKT, English - 120 Dean St., West Chester 

Thomas Willard Shaw, K 2, Chein. Eng., 922 Lamberton St., Trenton, N. J. 
Edward Kirkland Shelmerdine, 3rd, $ A ®, Mech. Eng. 

410 Cedar Lane, Swarthmore 



Edith Harriet Sheppard, xn, History 
Jane Elizabeth Shibe, * M, Biology 
Mary Valliant Short, $ M, English - 
James Elliston Smith, Civil Eng. 
Herbert Branson Spackman, $ K *, Mech. 
Charles Norman Stabler, A Y, Pol. Science 
Margaret Louise Stafford, n B *, History 
Emily Boorman Strong, Chcm. Eng. . - 
Ruth Evelyn Tanguy, IT B $, French 
Katherine Taylor, English - - - - 
Earl Russell Thoenen, K 2, Cheni. Eng. 
Peter Edward Told, Pol. Science - - - 
Boyd McMurtrie Trescott, $ A ®, Engineering - 
Henrietta Jackson Turner, H B >I>, Biology 



601 N. Poplar St., Charlotte, N. C. 

4939 Cedar Ave., Philadelphia 

Seaford, Del. 

R. F. D. No. 2, Media 

Eng. - - - Coatesville 

128 Rutgers Ave., Swarthmore 

149 Sumac St.., Philadelphia 

Hillburn, N. Y. 

- West Grove 

Hopewell, N. J. 

Sistersville, W. Va. 

Swarthmore 

Berwick 

Belvidere, N. J. 



Henry Chandlee Turner, Jr., * K *, Civil Eng. 

28 Monroe Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Tacy Bailey Walton, English ------ Westtown 

Ruth Watters, A r, Biology - - - 239 Haverford Ave., Swarthmore 
Jay Benoir Weidler, K 2, Mech. Eng. - 2107 Diamond St., Philadelphia 

Allen Prescott Willis, A Y, Engineering - - - - Rosslyn, Va. 

PIelen Gould Wilson, 11 B *, French ----- Lansdowne 

Margaret C. Young, $ M, Latin ------ Latrobe 




134 



^x-Mlembers of 1923 



Mary Rhoda Armstrong 
Constance Eleanor Barr, K K r 
Harry Raymond Baxter, * 2 K 
Paul Evan Brown, $ K * 
Thomas Frederic Chesnut, $ 2 K 
El wood Staats Deakyne, * 2 K 
Emily Louise Duncan 
Virginia Hay^nes Evans, KA© 
George Washington Eyre, Jr. 
Andrew Arthur Gardner, $ A O 
Tom M. Gephart, Jr., K2 
John Clarke Harper, Jr., $ A ® 
George Thompson Harris 
Howard John Hollingsworth 
Mary Hoke, K A ® 
Emily Fawcett Johnson 
Howard Leroy Johnston, K2 



John Norman Klein- 
Gertrude Paula Knapp 
Bettie Carlisle Larimore 
Emma Eleanor Love, # M 
Edythe Estelle Moore 
Louis Ely Mullin 
Alice Mowrer Nagle, # M 
Lillian White Perkins 
Helen Porter 
Horace Redfield, * K * 
Charles A. Ritchie, Jr., $ A 
Theodore Kremer Sawyer 
Elizabeth Katherine Scott, K A © 
Dorothy Tomlinson, * M 
Silas Marion Warner, A Y 
Charles McCrea White 
Alfred James Young, $ K * 



135 



.mar r 




136 




TA 



r^ciw 



1:57 




138 





HARRY L. SHEITARD 



DAVIS W. SHOEMAKER 



J^resl)mart (Tlass Officers 

Harry L. Sheppard - President - Davis W. Shoemaker 

George W. Lentz - Vice President James D. Calderwood 

Lydia Philips - - - Secretary - C. Margaret Kennady 

Alan H. Mendenhall Treasurer - E. Malcolm Webster 





LYDIA PHILIPS 



MARGARET KEXNADT 



i:i9 




!^ember5 of tl)e Class of 1924 



Nella Tamson Arnold, n B $ - 
Anna Mooee Bancroft, K A ® 
Sara Martha Bantom, $ M 
Carl Clifford Barnes, Elec. Eng. 
Cameron Cardoza Barr, Chem. Eng. - 
Valerio Antonio Bernardo, Biology 
Mary Parke Bicking - - - - 
Livingston Lord Blair, Pol. Science 
Robert Pierce Bodine, ^K*, Economics 
Vea Atlantis Booth, * M, Biology ' 
Esther May Briegel, History 



- 201 Elm Ave., Swarthmore 

- Sandy Springs, ]\Id. 

- 5018 Willow Ave.. Philadelphia 

224 Haverford Ave., Swarthmore 

504 Flarvard Ave., Swarthmore 

502 E. Eighth St., Chester 

East Downingtown 

- 629 S. 2nd St., Springfield, 111. 

IS Carroll St., Trenton, N. J. 

4966 Broadway, New York City 

3518 Haverford Ave., Philadelphia 



Edgar Mattern Brill - - - 1216 W. Allegheny Ave., Philadelphia 
Maurice Jackson Brinton, Jr., Mech. Eng. _ _ _ - Christiana 
Eliza Ranson Brooke, French __----. Upland 

Howard Bertram Brunner, $ A 0, Cheutistry - - Fifth St., Boyertown 
Grace Emma Burgin, English 4697 Castor Rd., Frankford, Philadelphia 

William Arment Burns, English - - - 1512 Walnut St., Chester 
Elizabeth St. John Burton, X Q, English 1135 Atwood Rd., Philadelphia 
James Dixon Calderwood, O 2 K, Economics ----- Tyrone 
Clarence Howard Carr, AY, Chem. Eng 
George Keighley Chandler, English 
Agur C.A.STLE CoE, Economics - - - 
Helen Johnson Collins, XQ, English 
Eleanor Hite Conrow, K A ©, English - 
Allison Jerome Cope, Jr., Civil Eng. 
Samuel Louis Cornish, Civil Eng. 



- 821 N. 21st St., Philadelphia 

Landenberg 

Knoxville, Tenn. 

1062 W. 4th St., Williamsport 

- Cream Ridge, N. J. 

212 W. Clark St., Champaign, 111. 

Collegeville 



Clara Louisa Davis, Biology 
Guy Witherston Davis, English 
Helen Louise Davis, K K r, French - 
Dorothy Ross Denlinger 
John George Dieterle, Jr., K 2, Civil Elng 
Amos Dotterer, A Y, Chemistry 
Margaret Estella Driscoll, French 
William Leigh Early - - - - 
Arthur Fred Eichhorn, Biology 
Dorothy Miller Evans, K A ©, English 

140 



Morton 

9 Bonsall Ave., Glenolden 

- 413 Grove Ave., Johnstown 

145 Waverly Place, New York City 

104 W. Penn St., Germantown 

\\'ayne 

- Verona Branch, N. J. 

801 W. 18th St., Sioux Falls, S. D. 

- 547 Marshall St., Elizabeth, N. J. 

223 N. Monroe St., ^Media 



Raymond Flint Fakringer, Client. Eng. 
Eliza Moore Fischer, X n, English 
Catherine Fitzhugi-i, English 
Robert Keene Fitzpatrick 
Martha Elizabeth Flennek, English 
Laura Isabel Fritts, Mathematics 
Catherine Roth Garner, English 
MiLus Osgood Gay, English 
Helen Gerhart Gery, X 12, English 
Louise Geyer, A r, English 



900 Flarvard Ave., Swarthmore 

Swarthmore 

1910 G Ave., Flatbush, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Princeton, N. J. 

Chester Heights 

- 535 N. 11th St., Philadelphia 

130 S. Jardin St., Shenandoah 

- 130 N. Davis St., Woodbury, N. J. 

261 Main St., East Greenville 

Maple Ave., Martinsburg, W. Va. 

455 W. 141st St., New York City 



Marjorie Louise Goetze, K K r. Biology 
Edward Atkinson Green, * a 0, Elec. Eng., 222 Meredith St., Kennett Square 
Edward Hicks Green, 2nd., Elec. Eng. - 52 Centre St., Woodbury, N. J. 
Florence Wolverton Green, K K r, French Chester Road, Swarthmore 

William Horace Grobert. * 2 K, Civil Eng., HI Halstead St., East Orange, N. J. 
Charles Bryant Grove, A Y, Pol. Science, 2708 Cathedral St., Washington, D. C. 
Jesse Mowbray Hadley, <I> 2 K, Elec. Eng. _ _ . Florence, Colo. 
George FIaines, 4th., English - - - 305 West Minor St., West Chester 
Russell Manson Heath, AY, Chcui. Eng. 1020 2nd St., Great Falls, Mont. 

RuTii Sara Henby ----- 625 West Main St., Greenfield, Ind. 
Nellie May Henderson, Mathematics - - - - Millville, N. J. 

Margaret Herrmann, AT, History 1736 Columbia Rd., Washington, D. C. 





141 




142 



Philadelphia 

- Box No. 157, West Chester 

- 43 W. Eighth St., Chester 

2028 N. 15th St., Philadelphia 

Medford. N. j. 



Margaret Elizabeth Hershey, Biology - ' - - - - - < iap 

Thomas Otxo Hertzberg, $ 2 K, Mcch. Eng. Pine St., Sheboygan Falls, Wis. 
Esther Jackson Hicks, KA® - - - - - Westbury, L. I., N. Y. 

Maxwell Allen Hoffman, Economics - 532 Columbia Ave., Millville, N. J. 
Gertrude Hollingsworth, Mathematics - 108 Ardmore Ave., Ardmore 
Anne Parker Hunt, IIB* - - - 811 E. College St., Iowa City, Iowa 
Margaret Jesson ------- Hightstown, N. J. 

Marian Lyston Jones - - - - - - - Harrington, Del. 

Mary Hqbson Jones, n B <E> - - - - 818 High St., Pottstown 

Jerome Kandall ----- 200 W. 113th St., New York City 

C. Margaret Kennady, II B *, English ----- West Grove 

Carl Frederick Knauer, * K *, Economics, 8028 Frankfort Ave., Philadelphia 
Janet Krall, X a, Biology -------- Lansdowne 

Carolyn Armitage Krusen, A r, Elconomics - 

Dorothy Beaumont Lapp, History 

George William Lentz, K 5, Pol. Science 

Margaret Dennisson Levering, A r, English 

John Willard Lippincott, $ K *, Mcch. Eng. 

Marion Jordan Lodge - - 110 N. Commerce St., Paulsboro, N. J. 

Frederick Ramsay Long, * K *, English - - 601 W. Ninth St., Chester 

Dorothy McClaren, n B * - - - 202 East Green St., Connellsville 

Ruth Cromwell McClung, Biology ----- Swarthmore 

Dorothy Beatrice McKim, Mathematics - - 526 Sixth St., Ellwood City 
Kathryn Elizabeth Madden, K K r - 16 Frazer Ave., Collinswood, N. J. 
Kenneth Payne Martin, Chemistry - 8424 116th St., Richmond Hill. X. Y. 
Mary Grouse Melvin, English ------ Denton, Md. 

Alan Hamilton Mendenhall, $ 2 K, Economics - - Toughkenamon 

Richmond Pearson Miller, * A 0, Pol. Science 640 N. Third St., Reading 
Herbert Cadwallader Mode, A Y, Mech. Eng. 2012 Boulevard, Wilmington 
Isabel Walda Moeller, K A ® - 1840 Chapman Ave., East Cleveland, O. 

Phillips Lovering Morrison, Chem. Eng. - - Harvard Ave., Swarthmore 
Harry Merle Mulloy, * 2 K, Economics 5831 Florence Ave., Philadelphia 
Frederick Allen Musselman, 9 A®, Economics - 718 Fulton St., Chester 
Charles Barker Muth, English - - 525 S. Walnut St., West Chester 
Robert L. Myers, Elec. Eng. - - - - - Main St., Dallastown 

Joseph Michael Nacrelli, Economics - - 1830 W. Third St., Chester 

Miriam Frances Naylor -------- Allentown 

Bertha May Ogden Chemistry - 143 S. Carolina Ave., Atlantic City, N. J. 



143 



Eng. 



Davida Charlotte Olinger. English - 
Thomas Sumner Oliver, Mech. Eng. 
Harry Edward Oppenlander, K 5. Mcch 
C. Alfred Paxson, Mech. Eng. 
Joseph Hallowell Penrose 
Lydia Hall Philips, K A ®, Biology 
Margaret Pitkin, AT, French - 
Sidney Elizabeth Pollick, X n, Biology 
Malcolm Pownall, a Y, Mech. Eng. - 
Franz Linck Ralston, * K *, Civil Eng. 
Lucy Ridgway, $ M, Mathematics 
Florence Elizabeth Rogers, n B * 
Hazel Drucilla Rowley, History 
Dorothea Rushmore _ _ _ _ 
Roger Sidwell Russell, A Y, Elec. Eng. 
Jennie Ryan, Latin _ - _ - 

Leonard Krewson Sawyer, Mech. Eng. 
Sara Alice Schrack, n B *, English 
Harry Leon Sheppard, K 2, Ciz'il Eng. 
Mary Elizabeth Shinn, $ M, English - 
Davis Wilbur Shoemaker, $ K *, Economics 
Philip Sipler, Economics . . - 



Swarthmore 

- 608 W. Ninth St., Chester 

210 E. Gorgas St., Mt. Airy 

302 S. Wahiut St., West Chester 

Neshaminy 

910 VanBuren St., Wilmine^ton. Del. 

- 247 I-lillcrest Ave., Trenton, N. J. 
Philadelphia 

519 Main St., Coatesville 

, 1741 W. Venango St., Philadelphia 

Hancock's Bridge, N. J. 

W. Frederic St., Corry 

- 1409 24th St., Two Rivers, Wis. 
36 Carroll St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

New Windsor, Md. 

Forest Grove 

- Swarthmore 

556 Chestnut St., Coatesville 

160 East Ave., Bridgeton, N. J. 

Swarthmore 

8115 D St., Philadelphia 

- 883 Main St., Darbv 



Virginia Smith, Economics - - 455 Washington Ave., Glencoe. 111. 

Dorothy Register Sniffen, Economics 4810 Warrington Ave., Philadelphia 
George Wtlloughby Stephenson, * A ®, Biology 

2)7 Westview Ave., Germantown 
Lois Dorothea Svendsen, English - - 817 Lincoln Place, Spokane, Wash. 
Mary Swartzlander, English - - - 82 E. Eighth St., Doylestown 
Karl Josef Lawer Swyler, * A 0, Civil Eng.. 520 Federal St., Camden, N. J. 



Thomas Thomson Taylor, Mcch. Eng. 
Reginald Cutler Terradell, K S. Biology 
Eva Kathlyn Thomas 
J. Howard Thompson, Jr., Mcch. Eng. - 
James Charles Tiley, <!> K *, Mech. Eng. 
Elmer Ellsworth Tittle, Economics 
Thomas Harold Urdahl, Civil Eng. - 
Lois Lee Vanderkleed, Chemistry - 
LIele.n Van Etten, English 



Ogontz 

17 Ewing St., Trenton, N. J. 

520 Fayette St., Conshohocken 

Kennett Square 

- 113 Edge Road, Bala 

Lebanon 

5417 Walnut St., Philadelphia 

200 Harvard Ave., Collingswood, N. J. 

Ill W. Harford St., Milford 



144 



Lois Maud Walkf-k. K K r, English 
Kenneth Charles Walter, $ 2 K, Elec. Eng 
Mary Fell Walter, K A ®, English 
Ernest Malcolm Webster, ^K^, Biology 
Elizabeth Adele Weiler, English - 
Leon Leonard Wenzel, $ 2 K, Chan. Eng. 
Margaret Lesly Wheeler . _ _ 
Charles Leonard Wilcox, K 2, Economics 
Albert James Williams, Jr., Elec. Eng. 
Earl Larkin Williams, Elec. Eng. 
Holland Williamson. <i> K *, Chemistry 
Catharine Wilson, X li, English 
Mildred Fawcett Wilson, French 
Waldemar Parker Wood, A Y, English 
E. Lawrence Worstall, Pol. Science 
Margaret Van Velthoven Wortiifngton, 
Gertrude Walton Yarnall, English 
George Longaker Yeakel, Mech. Eng. 
Dorothy Ellsworth Young, ^M, History 
Margaret Young, K A ®, Latin - 
Riddell Young, 11 B ®, French 



9 Hawthorne St., Orange, N. J. 

- Shawnee-on-Delaware 
Swartlimore 

Oakland, 111. 

(ilenolden 

- Bristol 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lansdowne 

301 South Ave., Media 

319 W. Barnard St., West Chester 

204 N. Walnut St., Danville, 111. 

118 W. Baltimore Ave., Lansdowne 

Box No. 118, West Chester 

Coatesville 

- E. Main St., Millville, N. J. 
Chemistry - - Rutledge 

- 735 Church Lane. Yeadon 

827 DeKalb St., Norristown 

227 Park Ave., Swarthmore 

- 120 Ferry St., Easton 

- 36 N. Maple Ave., Lansdowne 



Chester Girard Atkinson Zucker, $ A ®, Economics 



Red Bank, N. J. 





145 







146 




147 



Founded at the L'niversity of Virginia, 1869 





"pl (Tbapter 



Seniors 

James Furnas Bogardus 
William Porter Carter 
James Dawson Clancey 
Howard Bleasdale Katzenbach 
George Henry Kolb 
Frank Krick Machemer 



Charles Singleton Mears 
George \\'illiam Place 
George Alfred Powell 
Joseph Janvier Pugh 
William Hinchman Stow, Jr. 
Russell White 



Juniors 

Jackson Miller Blackburn Benjamin Engle Groff 

Allen Gray Clark William Peter Lowden 

Frank Sidebotham Dudley Vincent Bernard Schneider 

John Evanson Earp Howard Knott Shaw 

Sophomores 

Richard Janney Cornell Wallace Ross Linton 

Samuel Brecht Gaumer Ferdinand Leslie Nofer 

Rale Lee Hartwell Thomas Willard Shaw 

William Thomas Knowles Jay Benoir W'eidler 

Freshmen 

John George Dieterle, Jr. FLvrry Leon Sheppard 

George William Lentz Reginald Cutler Terradell 

Harry Edward Oppenlander Charles Leonard Wilcox 

14S 




149 



Founded at Washington and Jefferson College, 1852 








43 eitnsYlvanla TKofipa (ri)apter 

Seniors 

Grant Emerson Benjamin Henry Turner Evans 

Boyd Janney Brown William Yates Irwin, ]r 

Leon Howard Collins, Jr. W'illiam Powell Kemi' 

Walter Haines Dickinson Donald Swain Morgan 

Alan Chester Valentine 



Juniors 

Francis Caton Blair 

Harold Lurcott Butterworth 

Carl Joseph Geiges 

Edward Armstrong Gillespie 

Lanta Corrine Hastings 



William Sproul Lewis 
Jesse Roger Moore 
Warren Harvey Ogden 
Paul Sharpless 
John Leech Stainton 



Sophomores 

CoLLWYN Kennedy Humphreys 
Clarence Philip Kistler 
Frank Clark Long 
John Raymond ]\IcCain 
Herbert Bransom Spackiian 



Lester Asplundh 

John Edward Clyde 

James Alexander Cochrane, Jr 

George Livingston Earnshaw 

Louis Robert Enslin 

Henry Chandlee Turner, Jr. 

^ ' ' ' freshmen 

Robert Pierce Bodine James Charles Tily 

Carl Frederick Knauer Davis ^^'ILBUR Shoemaker 

Frederick Ramsay Long Ernest AL\lcolm \\'ebster 

John \\'illard Lippincott Holland A\'illl-\mson 

Franz Linck Ralston 



150 




151 



Founded at Williams College, 1834 




Swart^more (ri)aptcr 

Seniors 

Frank Edward Atkins, Jr. \\"illiam AIinton Harvey 

Alfred Christensen William Ronald Huey 

Charles Benjamin Coles George Bement Jackson 

TowNSEND Sherman McAllister 

Juniors 

Joseph Garner Anthony Frank Hand Jackson 

\\'iLLiAM Brinton Brosius William Joseph Pownall 

Henry Sherman Chase, Jr. William Thomson Taylor 

Sophomores 

Lewis Sims Ayars, Jr. Andrew Bickley Ritter 

George Julian Courtney Alban Eavenson Rogers 

Ned Sherry Hankins Charles Norman Stabler 

Allen Prescott ^^'ILLIS 



Freshmen 



Clarence Flo ward Carr 
Amos Dotterer 
Charles Bryant Grove 
Russell Manson Heath 



Herbert Cadwallader Mode 
ALalcolm Pownall 
Roger Sidwell Russell 
W^aldemar Parker ^^■ool> 



152 




153 



p[)i Sigma IKappa i^ratcrnitY 

l^'ounded at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1873 




431)1 (Ebapter 



Seniors 



Edward Evans Bartleson, 3rd 
John Woolman Dudley 
Norman Bird Grobert 



Charles Plummer Larkin^ Jr. 
Charles Wildey Ll'kens 
William Staunton jMoylan 



Albert Laurence Baxter 
William Rufus Cisney 
George Morton Daller 
Alexander Johnson Esrey 
Walton Canby Ferris 
Ormsby Duvall Hampson 



Juniors 

John Maddux Hilgert 
Frederick Norton Landon 
Frank Henry Lemke 
John Clampitt Longstreth 
Robert Spotswood Pollard 
Harry McKinley Sellers 



George Woodbridge Stewart 



Edwin Scobie Baker 
Mahlon Carleton Hinebaugh 
LaTelle McKee LaFollette 
Samuel Harold McConnell 



Sophomores 

George Myrick, Jr. 
Thomas Hall Phillips 
Joseph Harlan Powell 
Albert \^'ELDING Preston, Jr. 



James Dixon Calderwood 
William Horace Grobert 
Jesse Mowbray H.^dley 
Thomas Otto Hertzberg 



David Rose 

Freshmen 

Alan Hamilton Mendenhall 
Harry Merle Mulloy 
Kenneth Charles Walter 
Leon Leonard Wenzel 



154 




155 



Founcletl at Miami Uni\ersity, 1848 




4!'enitsYlvanla TKappa (Lifaft&r 



\\'iLLiAM Morse Blaisdell 
Franklin Preston Buckman 
Richard .-Vrment Darlington 

Alexander Hamilton Bressler 
LaMar Hay Davenport 

W'lLLARD SlINGERLAND ElSBREE 



Seniors 

W'ayland Hoyt Elsbree 
Albert Conard Mammel 
George Malcolm ^^'EST 

Juniors 

Herbert Lucius Hutchinson 
Richard William Slocum 
John Colbourne Smith 



Russell Atlee Yarnall 



Paul LaForge Clark 
A\'iLLiAM ^VEST Joyce 
^^'ILLIAM Newton Landis 
William Atherton Limberger 

Boyd McMurtrie Trescott 



Sophomores 

John Malcolm Pratt 
Joseph Daniel Rowley 
Charles Regnier Russell 



Edward Kirkland Shelmerdine, 3rd 



Howard Bertram Brunner 
William Leigh Early 
Edward Atkinson Green 
Richmond Pearson jNIiller 



Freshmen 

Frederick Allen Musselman 
George Willoughby Stephenson 
Karl Josef Lawer Swyler 
Chester Girard Atkinson Zucker 



156 




157 



3iaipipa ^lf>l)a O^eta J^ratcruit^ 

Founded at De Pauw Uni\ersity, 1870 




Seniors 

Edith Anna Evans • Ruth MeKeel Washburn 

Miriam Atkinson Jenkins Frances Dorothy Wiels 

Juniors 

Marjorie Lawrence Fell Elizabeth Taylor Sellers 

Elsa Palmer Winnie AIiller ^YEIHENMAYER 



Katiiryn Pflaum 



Sophomores 

Anna Satterthwaite Roberts 



Freshmen 

Anna jMoore Bancroft Isabel Walda Moeller 

Eleanor Hite Conrow Lydia Hall Philips 

Dorothy Miller Evans Mary Fell Walter 

Esther Jackson Hicks Margaret Young 



158 




159 



4^1 !^eta 4^1)1 JP^raternit^ 

Founded at Monmouth College, Illinois, 1867 




Seniors 

Anna Jemima Beatty Elizabeth Norbury Schellinger 

Dorothy Armstrong Kinsley Mary Norbury Schellinger 

Frances Katharine Miller Rachael Mae Sheetz 

Grace Taylor Wilson 



Miriam Robin Breuninger 
Katherine Lee Crosby 
Edith Gihon Cugley 



Augusta Allen 
Elizabeth Jarrett Anderson 
Jean Elizabeth Bond 
Frances Sarah Carter 
Kathryn Elizabeth Cleckner 



Nella Tamson Arnold 
Anne Parker Hunt 
Mary' Hobson Jones 
C. Margaret Kennady 



Juniors 

Ella Hansell Falck 
Irene Elizabeth Rems 
Ruth Martha Thompson 

Sophomores 

Frances Elizabeth Gillespie 
Margaret Louise Stafford 
Ruth Evelyn Tanguy 
Henrietta Jackson Turner 
Helen Gould Wilson 

Freshmen 

Dorothy McClaren 
Florence Elizabeth Rogers 
Sara Alice Schrack 
Riddell Young 



160 




161 



Founded at [Monmouth College, Illinois, 1870 




^eta ~3ola (Tljapter 



Seniors 

Elizabeth Middleton Atherholt Charlotte Price Speakman 
Helen Lydia Griscom Eleanor \\'eber 

;\Iarjorie Estelle Kistler Janet Graham Young 

Juniors 

Dorothy Florence Anderson Frances Virginia Runk 

Helen Gawthrop Marian Willis Satterthwaite 

Elizabeth Bradway Griscom Matilda Simpson 

Dorothy Frances Haines Dorothy Reid Varian 

Jean Bertram Knowles Carolien Hayes White 

Sophomores 

Eleanor Rosalynd Atherholt Margaret Laurie Hayes 
IsABELLE Shaw Fussell Ann Elizabeth Johnson 

Rena Sprague Sharples 

Freshmen 

Helen Louise Davis Florence ^^'0LVERT0N Green 

INIarjorie Louise Goetze Kathryn Elizabeth ]\L\dden 

Lois Maud ^^■ALKER 



162 




163 



iDelta (bamma JF'raternlt^ 

Founded at Oxford Institute, Mississippi, 1873 




Seniors 

Janet Clark Hileegarde Marie Hexamer 

LoRNA Beatrice Christie . Helen Cooper Knight 

Elizabeth Agnes Fisher Mildred Carmany Stout 

Josephine Dean Zartman 



Juniors 



Grace Edel Gourley 
Charlotte Hand Griffen 
Anne Frances Heafford 



Henrietta Ida Keller 
Dorothy Patten Nassau 
Helen INIaria Thorne 



Sophomores 

Julia Alice Alexander Katharine Russell Hayes 

Susannah George Beury Louise Buhler Huff 

Sara Elizabeth Bitler Elizabeth Frederica Fanning 

Elsie Palmer Brown Martha Pancoast Lippincott 

Ruth \\'atters 

Freshmen 

Louise Geyer Margaret Dennisson Le\-ering 

Margaret Herrmann Margaret Pitkin 

Carolyn Armitage Krusen Virginia Smith 



164 




165 



(El)i Omega Jf^raternit^ 

Foundetl at the Uni\'ersit_\' of Arkansas, 1895 




^amma ^lpl)a (Tljaptcr 



Seniors 

Virginia Laws Coi.ema.\' 
Mary Dotterek 
Margaret Wilson Embery 
Eleanor Wickersham Green 



Ethel Johanna Kai'lan 
Lucy Ayres Rainier 
Ior<A Genevieve Sutch 
Ciiaulotte Graves ^\"ASluu■R^■ 



Juniors 



T'EI^XICE CiORDlN BONNER 

Vera Shearer I'"letcher 
,\nne I\Lary Gault 
Edith Imlay Silver 



Elsie Isabel Smith 
Elizabeth Denmng Strang 
Eloise Tourny 
]\Ierle ]\rARiE Wood 



Sophomores 

i\L-\RGARET Ruth Crocker Helen ]'arrott 

AJary Ann Todd McCall Ruth Elizabeth Pownall 

Edith Harriet Sheppard 

Freshmen 

Grace Emma Burgin Helen Gerhart Gerv 

Elizabeth St. John Burton Janet Krall 

Helen Johnson Collins Sidney Elizabeth Pollick 

Eliza JNIoore Fischer Catherine Wilson 



166 




167 



p[)i Mlu JFralernit^ 

Founded at \\'esleyan College, (jeorgia. 1852 




!&eta Cpsllon (Eljaptcr 

Seniors 

Eleanore Albino Butler Catherine Ott Rhoads 

Emily Elizabeth Hallauer Helen Ethel Samuel 

Mabel Gladys Newton Thelma Marguerite Taylor 

^Iarion Deputy 

Juniors 

Jeanette Dell Edith M. Hare 

Blanche McMullen Josephine Lawyer Moorhead 

Eleanor Anna Shinn 

Sophomores 

Eleanore Esther Boyd Jane Elizabeth Shibe 

Alice Rebecca Hoagland Mary Valliant Short 

Helen Mae Rigby Margaret C. Young 

Freshmen 

Martha Bantom Lucy Ridgway 

Elizabeth Shinn Hazel Drucilla Rowley 

Dorothy E. Young 



168 




169 




170 




ill 



TEpsiloit (Li^aptzr of "Pennsylvania 



Officers 

President ------ Abby AIary Hall Roberts, '90 

Vice President - - - - - - J. Carroll Hayes, '89 

Secretary ------- Helen B. S. BrintoNj '95 

Executive Committee 

Mary Wolverton Green, '92 Ethel H. Brewster, '07 

Roland G. Kent, '95 \Villl\m I. Hull, (Faculty) 

Charter Members 

Edward H, Magill (Brown Universitj' Chapter) 
William H. Appleton (Harvard University Chapter) 

Fratres in Facultate 

William H. Appleton (Harvard University Chapter) 
Elizabeth Powell Bond (Swartlimore Chapter) 
Ethel H. Brewster (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Isabelle Bronk (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Robert C. Brooks (Indiana University Chapter) 
*SusAN J. Cunningham (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Harold C. Goddard (Amherst Chapter) 
J. Russell Hayes (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Jesse H. Holmes (Nebraska University Chapter) 
William I. Hull (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Henrietta J. Meeteer (Indiana University Chapter) 
John A. Miller (Indiana University Chapter) 
Clara Price Newport (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Joseph Swain (Swarthmore Chapter) 
Hekry V. GuMMERE (Harvard University Chapter) 

Honorary Members 

Elizabeth Powell Bond *Susan J. Cunningham 

*Arthur Beaedslev Franklin Spencer Edmonds 

*WlLLIAM W. BiRDSALL *H0WARD M. JeNKINS 

*IsAAC H. Clothier *William P. Potter 

Joseph Swain 

Class of 1920 

Elected in Junior Year 
Marguerite P. Drew Henrietta A. Smith 

Elected in Senior 'i'ear 
JunA Thurston Bope Leon Morris Pearson 

Frank Whitson Fetter Helen Alexander Ramsev 

Preston Henry Judd Marie E. L. Genevieve Tarby 

Helen Vogdes Macartney Mildred Esteli.e Williard 

Charlotte Emma Moore 



*Deceased. 



172 



iDelta Sigma !J\l)0 



Founded at Chicagrj, April 13, 1906 
"An organization to encourage effecti\-e and sincere public s|)caking''' 

Students who have represented the Cnllege in an Inter-Collegiate Delnite or 

Oratorical Contest arc eligible for meinhcrship at the 

end of their Jnnior Year 



President 

Secret ary-Trcas arc r 



Officers 



Philip M. Hicks 
William P. Kemp 



Active Members 



Wayland Hoyt Elsbree, 192 1 William Powell Kemp, 192 i 

Alan Chester Valentine, 1921 



Francis Grant Blair, 1897 
Bird Thomas Baldwin, 1900 
Elizabeth Percy Sutton, 1903 
Joshua Hibbert Taylor, 1903 
Halliday Rogers Jackson, 1904 
Philip Marshall Hicks, 1905 
Caroline Hadley Robinson, 1906 
Robert Leslie Ryder, 1906 
Amos Jenkins Peaslee, 1907 
Simeon Van Trump Jester, 1908 
George Gustavus Dilworth, 1908 
Louis Russell Coffin, 1909 
William Russell Tyler, 1910 

GURDEON BlODGETT JoNES, I9IO 



Alumni Members 

*A. Roy Ogden, 19 14 
Raymond T. Bye, 1914 



Claude Corall Smith, 1914 
Paul Miller Cuncannon, 191 5 
William Wesley Matson, 1915 
Hugh Frederick Denworth, 1916 
Edwin Augustus Tomlinson, 1916 
P. Carl Shrode, 1916 
Clarence Gates Myers, 19 17 
*Harold Ainsworth, 191 7 
James Clarence Lukens, 191 7 
William West Tomlinson, 191 7 
Paul Fleming Gem mill, 19 17 
Lynn Hamilton Baily, 191 7 



Raymond Keenan De'nworth, 1911 Dean Copper Wi'dener, 1918 



Joseph Henry Willits, 191 i 
Charles x\aron Collins, 1912 
William King Hoyt, 1912 
J. Augustus Cadwallader, 19 12 
Washington Russell Green, 191 3 



David AL^lcolm Ho'dge, 1919 
Andrew R. Pearson, 19 19 
Allin Hugh Pierce, 1919 
Detlev ^^'uLF Bronk, 1920 

\\"lLLIAM \W\LLACE HeWETT, I92O 



•Deceased 



173 



Sigma Oau 



Founded at the University of Nebraska, Fel3ruar_v 24, 1904 

Majors in Engineering i^'ho liai'e displayed marked ability in scholarship 
are eligible after their Sophomore year 



George F. Blessing 
Lewis Fussell ' 



ytu (L\)af>ti.r 

Faculty Members 

Rexford a. Harrower 
Charles G. Thatcher 



Alumni Members 



Henry C. Turner, "93 
William Penn Lukens, '13 
W. Harry Gillam, '13 
Harvey Vaughn Bressler, '14 
Milton H. Fussell, Jr., '15 
F. Lawrence Pyle, '16 
J. Siddons Neville, '16 
Lynn H. Bailey, '17 
Richard L. Burdsall, '17 
Randolph B. Harlan, "17 
Adolph Korn, '17 

Howard M. 



Walter B. Lang, "17 
G. Donald Spackman, '17 
H. Freeman Barnes, '18 
Louis N. Davis, '18 
Ralph H. Heacock, '18 
Charles M. Howell, '19 
Andrew Simpson, '19 
*T. Howard Atkinson, '20 
Detlev W. Bronk, '20 
Stephen C. Bunting, '20 
Clifford R. Gillam, '20 
Jenkins, '20 



student Members 
1921 

Fdward E. Bartleson, 3rd 

1922 

Frank H. Lemke 



CHAPTERS 



University of Nebraska 
University of Iowa 
L'niversity of Pennsylvania 
L'niversity of South Dakota 
Kansas State Agricultural College 
Oregon State College 



Washington State College 
Uni\-ersity of Illinois 
L'niversit}' of Colorado 
Penns}-l\ania State College 
l'niversity of Kansas 
L'niversity of Oklahoma 



Swarthmore College 



•Deceased 



174 



!5tlortar t!6oar6 

Founded February 20, 191 8 

The Honorary Society for Senior Women, ivliose purpose is the furthering of 
student responsibility tozi'ord the best interest of the College. The 
members are chosen -a'ifh reference to leadership, scholar- 
ship, and scrz'ice to Szvarthmore 

1921 

Emily Elizabeth Hallauer 
Miriam Atkinson Jenkins 
Frances Katharine Miller 
Claire Kathleen Strawn 
Lena Amelia Weiss 
Aline Mathieson Woodrow 
Janet Graham Young 
Josephine Dean Zartman 



175 



!^ook an^ IKe^ Senior Society 

William Porter Carter 
\\'ayland Hoyt Elsbree 

^^'ILLIAM MiNTON HaRX^EY 

William Powell Kemp 
Charles Plummer Larkin, Jr. 
\\'illiam Hinchman Stow, Jr. 
Alan Chester Valentine 



]7fi 




177 




.^5- 



Joseph Garner Anthony 
Albert Laurence Baxter 
William Rufus Cisney 
Allen Gray Clark 
George Morton Daller 
LaMar Hay Davenport 

JOI-IN EVANSON EaRP 

Lanta Corrine Hastings 
Jesse Roger Moore 
Richard William Slocum 



178 



ACTIVITIES 







179 




C»l)e 4^^oenix 



Published on Tuesdays During the College Year by the Students 
of Swarthmore College 

Editor-in-Chief 
Ai,AN C. Valentine, '21 



Associate Editors 

William M. Blaisdell, '21 
Donald S. Morgan, '21 

Director of JJ'oinen's Nczvs 
Miriam A. Jenkins, '21 

Local Editors 

Walton C. Ferris, '22 
Richard W. Slocum, '22 
George W. Stewart, "22 
Lena A. Weiss, '21 
Frances D. Wills, "21 



Business Manager 

James F. Bogardus, '21 

Circulation Manager 

Dorothy S. Blackburn, '21 

Ad-i 'crtisiuo- Mana srer 

William B. Brosius, '22 

Alumni Editor 

Caroline A. Lukens, '98 

Chairman Adi'isory Board 
Boyd J. Brown 



180 



!!^uil6in9 for 5wartl)more 

Bv Alan C. Vaj,entine, Editor of the I'lioeiiix 

It is still too earl)- in tlie college year to present a survey of the I'lioeiiix 
for the year 1920-1921. At the present writing we are still in the middle of 
the year's work. But the staff believes that it is carrying on well the trusts 
handed down by former Swarthmoreans. 

Our primar\- purpose has been to present the college news in a complete 
and interesting way. Clearness and attracti\-eness are the essentials we de- 
mand. Jn covering the news we ha\-e devoted more time and space than e\er 
before to the interests and doings of the alumni, for alumni constitute the ma- 
jority of our subscription list. 

Our co-ordinate purpose has been two-fold : to influence college sentiment 
toward what seems to us the right, and to bring- our alumni readers closer to 
the undergraduate problems of Swarthmore. We have tried to make our 
editorial column a live, vital factor in college affairs, and have hewed to the 
line when necessary. W'e believe that the Phoenix has taken a leading part in 
molding college sentiment into a better form, and thus made a real contribu- 
tion to college welfare. For this reason, the staff has encouraged the ex])res- 
sion of public opinion in its columns, and has stimulated discussion of college 
problems. 

The Phoenix is larger this year, but that is a natural growth, so we of 
192 1 cannot claim credit for it. The staff members ha\'e contributed more 
largeh- than usual to the welfare of the Phoenix, and their training has been 
in direction and initiative as well as in news writing. We believe that the 
Phoenix has l)uilt well for Swarthmore and for future undergraduate interests. 



General business conditions during the past year have had their effects on 
the manageinent of the Phoenix. Tightness of money, with the consecjuent 
difficulties of obtaining advertisements, have modified the business staff and 
retarded hoped for improvements. Six page issues have not been so numer- 
ous as we would ha^'e desired, and other contemplated features for a better 
sheet have given way to much hard work in order to obtain the necessary 
funds to keep up the high standards set in recent years. 

This is a brief and rather gloomy view of the situation at hand, but I can 
still see my way clear to state that the Phoenix will undoubtedly hold its pres- 
ent standards as to size and cfuality of printing if general business conditions 
do not change for the worse. In fact the present management is looking for- 
ward to improvements in printing, make-up and distribution in the near fu- 
ture. But in any e\-ent this ad\-ance will only be made possible by interest on 
the part of both students and alumni in an effort to increase the popularity 
and circulation of their mutual organ. So in closing I would urge the alumni 
and friends of Swarthmore to give e\ery possible support to the Phoenix which 
is becoming such an effecti\"e Hnk in graduate and under-graduate aft'airs. 



James F. Bogardus, 
Business Alanager. 



181 




C3be 1922 TCalc^on 

Editor-in-Chief 
^VALTON C. Ferris 



Associate Editors 

Marian Satterthwaite 
Richard W. Slocum 



Pliolographic Editor 

¥. Norton Landon 



The Staff 



Edith Cugley 
G. Morton Daller 
Elizabeth Griscom 
John M. Hilgert 
Herbert L. Hutchinson 



Business Manager 

\A'lLLARD S. ElSBREE 

Ad^'erfising Ulanager 

A. Laurence Baxter 

Art Editors 

Ella H. Falck 
F. Caton Blair 



Henrietta Keller 
Elizabeth Sellers 
Paul Sharpless 
Howard K. Shaw 



Winnie Weihenmayer 



Carolien White 



182 



In one of his famous collection speeches, Yarnall told the- s-tory of a retir- 
ing lire department chief in a small town. His loj'al subordinates took up a 
collection for a loving cup as a parting gift to the old man, and a big occasion 
was planned for the presentation. Both the man selected to make the gift, 
and the recipient of it memorized their long speeches beforehand. But when 
the presentation came they were both so confused by the crowd and by the 
solemnity of th.e occasion that the speeches were forgotten. The presenter 
stuml:)led across the platform and ga\-e the cup, stuttering out : 

"\\'ell, here she is." 

To which the chief replied, 

• "Hell, is that it." 

All of which applies here. The loving cup had to speak for itself, and 
so must this Halc3'on. 

We wish, howe\er, to here express our thanks to the many people who 
gave time and effort without which the book could not have been produced. 
The names of the college people are too numerous to mention, but one name 
from the outside must be given. Gordon Smith, ex-'22. was elected art editor, 
but did not return to college. In spite of this, he has done more art work for 
the staff than any other single artist, and many of the choicest cuts in the 
book are products of his skill with the ])en and with the brush. 



183 




Deri's Student (Government Association 

Executive Boards 

first Semester 

President ------- Alan C. Valentine, '21 

Seeretarx ------- Warren H. Ogden, '22 

Charles P. Larkin, '21 Wayland H. Elsbree, "21 

Russell A. Yarnall, "22 



Seeond Semester 



Charles P. Larkin, '21 
^^^\RREN H. Ogden, '22 



President ------- 

Secretary ------- 

W'm. Minton Harvey, "21 William P. Kemp, "21 

Russell A. Yarnall, '22 



1S4 




Somen's Student (Government Association 

Executive Board 

President -------- Helen L. Griscom, '21 

Vice President - - - - Marian \\'. Satterthwaite, '22 

Secretary - - - - - - - - Katharine Hayes. '2^ 

Treasurer -------- Elsa Palmer, '22 

Janet Young, '21 Hildegarde Hexamer, '21 

Lena Weiss, '21 Ethel Hinds, '22 



185 




Pouag Deri's (ri)ri$tian Association 



Organized September, 19 lo 



Omccrs 

President - - . ■ - - - - Wayland H. Elsbree, 

Vice President ----- \^'ILLIAM M. Blaisdell, 

Secrctarx-Treasurer - ----- - \\'illiam R. Cisney, 



2\ 



Cabinet 



Departntoit of Meetings 
Department of Membership 
Department of Speakers 



Alan C. Valentine, 

H. Chandlee Turner, Jr., 

A. Prescott Willis, 



21 
'23 
'23 



Freshman Handbook 



Editor 

Business Manazcr 



Richard W. Slocum, 
A. Laurence Baxter, 



22 
'22 



186 




young 'Somen's (ri)ri5Uan Association 

Organized February, 191 1 

Officers 

President ------- Emily E. Hallauer, 

Vice President ------ Elizabeth B. Griscom, 

Secretary ------- Margaret R. Crocker, 

Treasurer ------- Dorothy P. Nassau, 

Annua! Member ------- Thelma Taylor, 

Cabinet 

Chairman Religious Meetings Committee - Aline M. Woodrow, 
Chairman Bible Study Committee - - - - Grace ^^'ILSON, 
Chairman Social Serznce Committee - - - Frances AIiller, 
Chairman Social Committee ----- Edith Cugley, 
Chairman jllission Committee - - - Ruth Satterthwaite, 



21 



21 



"21 
"21 
"21 
'22 



187 




(Tercle J^rancais 



This club is, as its name indicates, a departmental club for the promotion 
of fluency and ease in speaking French, and familiarity with French litera- 
ture. It holds two kinds of meetings. There are the open meetings, to which 
all are invited, and the closed meeting's, to which only elected members are in- 
vited. The proceedings of the latter are conducted entirely in French. At the 
former, the programs include scenes from plays, faculty and outside talks on 
French life and customs, and games. The officers for the present college 
year are : 



President - 
Vice President 
Secretary - 
Treasurer 



- Helen Knight 

Janet Young 

William Conrad 

Ruth Thompson 



(Tlasslcal (Tlub 



The Classical Club is organized for the furthering of interest in culture 
and the classics. It consists largely of Latin and Greek majors, but others are 
invited. Noted scholars are obtained to lecture to the club, and much of in- 
terest is learned from them. Student programs and faculty talks are some- 
times given. The officers for the present college year are : 



President - 
J ice President 
Secretary - 



Aline M. Woodrow 

Josephine E. Tyson 

Marie Stettler 



188 




"^ngitieers' (Tlub 



The Engineers' Club is organized for the purpose of reviewing recent 
events and achievements in engineering, discussing questions not raised in the 
class room, giving power in the presentation of topics, promoting intimacy be- 
tween faculty and students, and providing- guidance in the engineering' \'oca- 
tions. Any engineering student is eligible. The officers for the present col- 
lege vear are : 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary- Treasurer 



Edward E. Bartleson, '21 

- Edwin R. Albertson, '21 

- Edward R. Smith, '22 



^atl)<tmatical (Tlub 



The Mathematical Club holds meetings twice a month in the Sproul 
Ohsei vator}', and the programs consist of lectures b}' outsiders, faculty mem- 
bers, and members of the club. It is the club for mathematics and astronomy 
enthusiasts, as many interesting sides of these subjects not touched on in the 
class room are there presented. The officers for the present college year are : 



President - 
Vice President 
Secretary - 



David M. Dennison, '21 

Boyd J. Brown, '21 

- Clara Dewees, "21 



189 






^*Bii 




„ 1 


ifi^ 




m' - 


4^ 


■IP-- ■ 


'>SU 


!■£' 


m 


■H 


J 


w 









ENGINEERS 






190 




191 



m 3. 




(Blee anb instrumental (Tlubs 

Herbert L,. Brown was again secured as coach this year, and piloted the 
musical clubs through a second successful season. The feature of the year 
was the tine list of concerts arranged by Manager Morgan. For the first time 
in history, the clubs journeyed to Atlantic City, where they gave two concerts, 
at Haddon Hall and at the Hotel Chalfonte. These concerts came immediately 
before the mid-year examinations, and had a big part in the hanging up of a 
record scholastic axerage for the first semester. 

The other two big events of the year were the regular \\'ilmington con- 
cert, at the Hotel Dupont, and the joint Ha\-erford-Swarthmore aft'air, given 
at the Bellex'ue-Stratford. The latter was one of the most successful joint 
Quaker e\ents on record. 



The Schedule 



January i y, S\\arthmore ^^'om- 
en's Club. 

January 21. Haddon Hall, At- 
lantic City. 

January 22, Chalfonte Hotel, .\t- 
lantic City. 

February 1 1 , Chester. 

February 18, West Chester. 



February 21, Joint Haverford- 
Swarthmore concert at the Bellexue- 
Stratford. 

March 4, Home concert, Parrish 
Hall. 

March 12, New York City. 

[March 18, Hotel Dupont, ^\'il- 
mington. 



192 



<5lee anb Ifastrumental (Tlubs 



Director 
Manager 



.-issistauf Manager 



HriKHlCKT I.. I'kOWN 

DoNAjjj S. Morgan 

WiLLAKU S. F.r.SBREE 



(BUe (Tlub 



First Tenors 

Albert L. Baxter 
Harold L. Butterworth 
Paul L. Clark 
Ormsby D. Hampson 
Mahlon C. Hinebaugh 
Harry L. Sheppard 

Second Tenors 

John W. Dudley 
Norman B. Grobert 
William H. Grobert 
John M. Hilgert 
Frank Hoke 
Harold E. Moore 
Ferdinand L. Nofer 
Herbert B. Spackman 



First Basses 

John C. Longstreth 
Charles R. Russell 
Howard K. Shaw 
George W. Stephenson 
H. Theodore Stubbs 
Reginald C. Terradell 
Chester G. A. Zucker 

Second Basses 

William M. Blaisdell 
Alexander L. Bressler 
William R. Cisney 
Arthur T. Lukens 
William S. Moylan 
Malcolm Pownall 
George W. Stewart 
Albert J. Williams, Jr. 



'Btistrumetital (Tlub 



Violins 

C. Clifford Barnes 
John W. Dudley 
Arthur T. Lukens 
George M. West 

Saxophones 

A. Jerome Cope 
Frank Hoke 
Leonard K. Sawyer 

Piano 

Samuel B. Gaumer 

Drums 

Earl R. Thoenen 



Mandolins 

Wallace R. Linton 
Harold E. Moore 
George Myrick, Jr. 
Edward K. Shelmerdixe 
George W. Stephenson 

Banjo 

A. Jerome Cope 

Trombone 

T. ^^'ILLARD Shaw 

Cornet 

\\'alter S. Rumble 



393 




O^e "Somen's (Blee (Tlub 

Until May 25, 1920, the Women's Glee Clnb was a good deal of a "dark 
horse" around college. On the evening of that concert, however, the Club 
achieved for itself a real place on the Swarthmore map. The program in- 
cluded many very good selections which were exceptionally well given. A 
great share of the success is due to the direction of Miss Edith M. Morgan, of 
Philadelphia, who has made the Club a live organization. Aside from in- 
structing the girls, she secured for the 1920 concert Miss Florence Haenle, 
and ]\Ir. Ednyfed Lewis, soloist, who lent \'ariety to the program. 

Work began early in the fall this vear, again under Miss ^Morgan's direc- 
tion. The girls are working hard this spring, and are trying to make the 192 1 
concert, scheduled for April eighth, even better than last year's. 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Otticers 



- Elizabeth Barth, '21 

- Evelyn Strawn, '21 

Dorothy Blackburn, '21 



19-t 




"Eiislisl) (Tlub 



Officers 

President -------- Josephine Zartman 

Secretary -------- Lorna B. Christie 

Treasurer -------- Henrietta Keller 

Members 1920-1921 
Anne Guisse Bockius Henrietta Keller 

Lorna B. Christie Gladys Newton 

Edith Cugley Ruth Washburn 

Ethel Hinds Carolien White 

Miriam Jenkins Josephine Zartman 

This year, the English Club has furnished the college with several very interesting open 
meetings. At one of them, Mrs. Katherine Fullerton Gerald, the well known writer, gave 
her opinions on the modern short story. On another occasion Miss Gorham addressed the 
club. Her talk on the development of English literature was of interest not only to her 
former pupils, but to all who heard her. 

At another meeting Grant Mitchell was the guest of honor. During his engagement in 
Philadelphia in "The Champion," he came out to Swarthmore and gave the club and its 
guests an interesting talk on his theatrical career. Everyone that heard him was charmed 
by his informal manner of telling anecdotes of his early struggles. 

Shortly before Christmas, the members of the club presented a charming harlequinade. 
"The Wonder Hat," coached by Janet Young. The fantastic element originally intended 
was caught by the actors, who entered entirely into the light spirit of comedy. The Eng- 
lish Club, through these varied and pleasant entertainments, has established for itself a de- 
sirable position in Swarthmore organizations. 

195 





Ol)c (Tampus (Tlub 



John W. Klopp 
- Elizabeth F. Barth 

\\^INNIE M. WeiHENMAYER 



President ------- 

J'icc President ----- 

Seeretary ------- 

The Campus Club is the newest of the Departmental Clubs, having announced itself to 
the world in November of the present college year. The organization is under the direc- 
tion of the Department of Biology and membership is limited to majors in that department. 
Tts purpose is to protect and preserve the natural features of the college campus, and also 
to stimulate interest in science by bringing .scholars of the first rank to Swarthmore to ad- 
dress the student body. In both of these aims the Club has succeeded commendably. The 
tags on the trees about the campus giving the names of the various species are some of the 
Club's accomplishments. The Campus Club gives promise of becoming a permanent asset 
to the College, working whole-heartedly for Swarthmore's betterment. 

List of Campus Club members : 
Elizabeth B..\rth, '21 John Klopp, '21 

Leon Collins, '21 Ruth McClung, '21 

TT.\NN.\H E.WENSON, '21 Ele.\nor Paxson, '21 

Elizabeth Fisher. '21 Eleanor Weber, '21 

Emjlv Hallauer, '21 Ruth Woodward, '21 

Elizabeth Justice, '21 La jNIar Davenport, '2i: 

Elizabeth Griscom, '22 

196 



PuM Koo Park, '22 
Irene Rems, '22 
Winnie Weihenmaver. '22 
Sara Bitler. '23 
William Limberger, '23 
Helen Wilson, '23 




ol)e "S" dlub 



Officers for i()2i 



President - - - 
Vice President 
Corresponding Secretary 
Recording Secretary 
Treasurer - - - 



- J. Frederic W'iese 

William H. Stow, Jr. 

Edwin M. Joseph 

- George H. Kolb 

Carl J. Geiges 



All junior and senior letter men in major sports are active memljers : and 
letter men in the two lower classes, ma}^ attend meetings, but may not vote or 
take part in the proceedings. 



V.)l 





THE 
GLEE CLUB 







N 




198 





M 




no 
JU 



199 




Ol)e little Ol)eater (Tlub 



A dramatic cinlj has at last lieen established at Swarthmore, and from 
now on the college dramatics will 1)e handled by The Little Theatre Club. As 
yet the club is still in the stages of early development, Ijut it promises to be a 
live working organization. The purpose of the club is to arouse interest in 
dramatics and to fill the place of the Public Speaking department in produc- 
ing plays on Founders Day, Somerville Day, etc. There will also be one large 
production given by the club each year for the benefit of the Halcyon fund. 
Onl}" upper-classmen are eligible to membership, and certain requirements 
must be met before memljers are admitted. It is hoped that liy the organiza- 
tion of this club Swarthmore dramatics will Ije put on a firmer basis and that 
the college will uphold the reputation it has made in dramatic lines. 

The charter members of the club are Lorna Christie, James A. Cochrane, 
Edith Cugley, Walton Ferris, Lanta Hastings, Hildegarde Hexamer, Ferdi- 
nand Nofer and Russell Yarnall. The membership now also includes Leon 
Collins, Morton Daller, John Hilgert, Ethel Kaplan, Rogers McCullough and 
Lena ^Veiss. 



Officers for ipso-ipJi 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Russell A. Yarnall 

Edith Cugley 

- ^^'ALT0N C. Ferris 



200 



The Sophomore play given for the Halcyon h'und was financially, as well 
as (h'amatically, a success. 

The plav chosen was "Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh." The plot, although 
simple, is interesting and, as the cast was excellently suited in each case to 
the parts, it went very smoothly. Briefly, it is the story of a rather mediocre 
Indiana famih- M-hich, through the wealth gained in the patent-medicine husi- 
ness, and the untiring" efforts of one member, Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh, man- 
ages to pose as English Aristocracy. The action centers chiefly around this 
one character. It is only through the conscience of her younger sister, Violet, 
that the truth is discovered while the Leighs are \-isiting the Rawson family 
at their Long Island summer home. The entrance of "Pete" Swallow — an old 
suitor of Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh — adds complications. The whole play ends 
happily with the marriage of Geoffrey Rawson, the attractive younger son of 
the host, and Violet. 

The parts were well taken. Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh was admirably done 
by Hildegarde Hexamer, while the part of her poor nervous old mother was 
excellently put across by Isabel Jacobs. The role of Violet, as played by 
Florence Twining, added a stabilizing influence. The other women's parts 
were taken as follows : 

Miss Rawson - - - - - - - Elizabeth Shannon 

Mrs. Lewis --------- Ethel Kaplan 

Nina, the Maid ------- Edith Cugley 

Ferdinand Nofer. as Geoffrey Rawson, made an excellent hero, and Law- 
rence McEvov, as his worthless elder l.irother, did some verv good charac- 
terization. The comic role of "Pete" Swallow, as taken by Rogers McCul- 
lough, brought down the house. 

The rest of the men in the plav were: 

Mr. Rawson - - - - - - - - Arthur Gardner 

Mr. Lewis ---------- Paul Hess 

Kitson, the Butler ------- Walton Ferris 

Even with such a good group' the play could not have been presented but 
for the untiring hel]:) and advice of Cornelia Stabler, the coach. The work of 
Russell Yarnall and Lanta Hastings, the managers, and of Elsie Smith, Ber- 
nice Bonner and Winnie Weihenniayer, on the property committee, deserves 
mention. 

The play drew a great crowd and aroused much favorable comment. 



201 





LOltNA CHRISTIE AND 
JAJIKS COCHRANE 



FRANCIS BLAIR 



It was lucky for the English Club and for the Endowment Fund that Maj^ 
the sixteenth was a clear day. Out there, in the auditorium, under the trees, 
there had indeed been much ado for at least a week, final rehearsals and loud 
hammering. After the play, however, it was unanimously considered that it 
was by no means about nothing. 

Shakespeare's well known comedy, "Aluch Ado .\l)out Nothing," was a 
great success in this setting, and was handled by Mrs. Ullman, the coach. The 
plot of the play, known to e\'eryone, held the interest of the audience through- 
out. \\'ith Lorna Christie a thoroughly charming Beatrice, and James Coch- 
rane as the worldly and sceptical Benedick on one hand ; and with Elizabeth 
Miller, a \-ery attractive hero, playing opposite Gayton Postlethwaite who was 
Claudio — the play was bound to be successful. 



202 



The comic scenes were excellent, for the actors entered into the Eliza- 
bethan spirit with an altogether charming abandon. The scenes between Dog- 
berry, pla3'ed by Ralf Hartwell, and Verges, acted by Charles Knssell, were 
especially commendable. 

The costumes added the needed historical touch to the play, and alto- 
gether, even without a glance into the well filled receipt boxes, one could tell 
that Shakespeare's comedy presented by 
cided hit. 



the English Club had scored a de- 




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.AYTON POSTI.ETHWATTR .\Xn 
EI,IZ.\KETH MILLER 



203 



Senior ^ia^ of 1920 

"^ttonslcur ^caucair^" 




Although a drizzh'ng rain tried to 
dampen the spirits of the Seniors and 
st(_)p the performance of "Monsieur 
Beaucaire," the class of 1920 presented 
their pla}- in a manner that enchanted 
their audience. The story, written by 
Booth Tarkington and dramatized by 
luhel Hale Freeman, was very appro- 
priate for the occasion, and the audi- 
ence was intensely interested through- 
out both performances. 

The scene of the play is laid in 
England. A notorious gambler as- 
sumes the name of Monsieur Beaucaire 
and forces the Duke of \\'interset to 
introduce him into high luiglish so- 
ciety. His main object, to meet Lady 
Mary Carlyle, is soon accomplished : 
luit his identity is discovered through 
his ser^■ant, and the Duke and his 
friends plan to reveal Beaucaire before 
Lady Mary. But the Duke and his friends are beaten, and after a week's 
absence and ensuing complications, Beaucaire is re\'ealed as the cousin 
of the king of France. He is gratefully recei\-ed into English society, 
but instead of marrying Lady Mary as would be expected, he returns to 
France to marry the lady whom the king has chosen for him. 

Leon Pearson pla}-ed the part of Beaucaire in a most unusual way. 
His accent and French mannerisms carried out his character to the last 
detail, and his interpretation of the part added greatly to the play. Cor- 
nelia Stabler as Lad}' Mary was charming, and Herschel Clark as the 
Duke of W'interset, and Isabel Jacobs as Lady Clarise, made the play 
one of the most fascinating productions that has been given at Swarth- 
more. 

The dances that were staged by Lucy ^^^ Penrose were delightful 
additions to the atmosphere of England in colonial times. The dance 
duet by I^uc}- Pem-ose and Helen Sigler lent much to the spirit of the 
play and the entire production was a fitting climax for the achievements 
of the class of 1920. 



W.\I.DO HAI.IIEM.W .\XD 
MAUY C.V.Mrr.KI.T. 



204 



Ol)e Jf^oun6er5' £>a'2 Jpla^s 

The Little Theater Club made its debut in the pnjducliun uf three one-act 
plavs gi\'en on Founders' Day. The plays were given in Collection Hall on 
the evening- of the Fifty-first Anniversary of the Founding of Swarthniore. A 
large audience of enthusiastic alumni and students crowded the room from 
top to bottom, making- use of the windowsills as box seats. 

A very good g-roup of plays was chosen — "Where But in America," the 
"Florist Shop," and "Embers." The light, humorous tone of the first two 
plays contrasted well with the more serious atmosphere of the thirrl. Lorna 
Christie and John Hilgert took the parts of Mr. and Mrs. Espenhayne, a young 
married couple in "Where But in America," and their trials and tribulations 
during their e\-ening- n-ieal were adn-iiraljly portra}'ed. Hilda, the n-iaid. alias 
Fmn-i)' Lou Bailey, helped them to soh'e their problems, and in the end dro\-e 
them to their new home in her own Packard car. 

The contrast in tone that "Embers" made to "Where But in An-ierica" 
added to the interest and variety of the program. The profound lo\-e of Mrs. 
Llarrington for her prodigal son, Jasper, formed the theme of the play, and 
the true devotion that Mr. King, a former unsuccessful suitor, held for Mrs. 
Llarring'ton throug'hout her whole life, brought happiness finally to both 
mother and son. The part of Mrs. Harrington was splendidl}- taken by Hilde-. 
garde Hexamer, and the wayward son Jasper was made realistic and true to 
life by Ferdinand Nofer's interpretation of the part. James Bogardus played 
the part of Mr. King, and the short play made a strong appeal to the whole 
audience. 

The final play made a good climax for the evening's program. "The 
Florist's Shop" was a big success from beginning to end, and the audience 
was in a constant fit of laughter. The influence that Slovsky's flower shop 
had on the lives of Mr. Jackson and Miss AA'ells was much greater than 
would have been expected from the appearance of the store. Maud, the sen- 
timental, sympathetic New York clerk, held the reins of the situation all the 
time, and it was by her secret gift of orchids that the fifteen-year engagement 
of the two lovers finally culminated in a "pink rose" wedding. Janet Young's 
New York slang was perfect in the character of Maud, and the scheming little 
girl won the hearts of everyone in the audience. Charles Russell made a re- 
markable Jew in the character of Slovsky, and the errand boy, Henry, played 
by Rogers McCullough, added a finishing touch to the play. Hope Cox. as 
Miss Wells, and Edgar Brill as Mr. Jackson were both verv good in the parts 
and very typical of lovers who needed a few orchids and roses in their lives. 

The three pla^-s made an unusual and enjoyable close for the Founders" 
Day celebration, and it is believed that after such admirable productions, the 
Little Theater Club will become a great success in Swarthn-iore. 

205 




"Ol)e Oamin^ of tl)e Sl)rew" 

Once again the English Chils gave a splendid contribution to the 
college in its presentation of the "Taming of the Shrew."', This Shakes- 
pearian production was one of the finest that the college has ever seen, 
and the cast cannot be praised too highly for their excellent work. 
Collection was magically transformed into the old city of Padua, and 
the audience was entranced by the Elizabethan atmosphere that was 
created. Lorna Christie as Katherina and John Hilg-ert as Petruchio, 
by the clash of their strong spirits, made the audience highlv hilarious 
and appreciative of their saucy, impudent words, Hilgert had the 
freedom and jest of the real Petruchio in his adventure of taming the 
shrew, and Lorna brought out all the determination and Ijulliance of 
the real Katherina in her combat with her lover. Bianca, played by 
Helen Knight, was as sweet and non-assertive as Katherina's sister 
should be. Bianca's suitors, Gremio, played by Charles Russell ; Hor- 
tensio, Richard Miller, and Lucentio, Ferdinand Nofer, were well done. 
The comic characters were interpreted in a genuine Shakespearian man- 
ner, and the foolish Biondello, played by Wildey Lukens, and Crumio, 
Rogers McCullough, were the real treats of the play. 

The play was coached by Miss Elizabeth 01i\'er, and the college was 
certainly fortunate in securing such a remarkable director. Her produc- 
tion was finished from lieginning to end. 

The English Club in its two years of existence has truly enriched the 
dramatic field of Swarthmore activities. 



206 




THE 




GIRLS 



l> LAY 
LACROSSE 




207 




208 




209 




THE \ AKSITY SglAI) 



Swartl)more (Lollege iDebate ^oar6 

President - - -- - - - - - James F. Bogardus 

Vice President ------- William P. Kemp 

Manager -------- Richard W". Slocum 

Coach ---------- Philip ^NI. Hicks 

Varslti? Oeams 

AfHrmative Negative 

Alan C. Valentine, '21, Captain James F. Bogardus, "21, Captain 

Wayland H. Elsbree, '21 Leon H. Collins, '21 

William P. Kemp, '21 Joseph J. Pugh, '21 

William M. Blaisdell, "21 Richard \\". Slocum, '22 

Herbert L. Hutchinson, '22 Norman C. Stabler, '2^. Alternate 

Alban E. Rogers, '22, Alternate Francis C. Blair, '22. Alternate 



210 



I5l)e i)ebate Season 



Debating proved a strono- attraction this year to Swarllinmre students, 
more than a score of canditlates reporting. From this number Coach Hicks 
developed a squad of debaters which, while winning only one of the four con- 
tests, made the season a profitable one. Each was very close and capably 
argued. 

The Garnet stvle of debating was changed this year by Coach Hicks. He 
now has his men talk extemporaneously rather than recite speeches memorized 
word for word. The experiment was very successful, as it ]:)roduced closer 
debates. \\'hile this system may not, guarantee strings of victories until longer 
in use. it does increase the \-alue of the training to the debaters themseh'es. 
since it teaches them to think and speak while on their feet. 

J'arsilx Question: Resoh'ed, "That labor should share in the manage- 
ment of corporate industry." 

SWARTHMORE vs. GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 
SwARTHMORE, March ii, 1921 

Sicarthiiiorc (Affirmative) Team 

Mr. Valentine Mr. Elsbree Mr. Kemp 

Won by George Washington, 2-r 

SWARTHMORE vs. WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY 
Morgantown, W. Va., March ii, 1921 

Swarthiiiore (Negatii'e) Team 

Mr. Bogar'dus Mr. Pugh Mr. Slocum 

Won by West Virginia, 2-1 

SWARTHMORE vs. TRINITY COLLEGE 
Swarthmore, March 18, 192 1 

Szvarthniore (Negative) Team 

Mr. Bogardus Mr. Pugh Mr. Collins 

Won by Trinity, 3-0 

SWARTH:M0RE vs. BUCKNELL UNIVERSITY 
Lewisburg, March 18, 1921 

Swarthmore (Affinuative) Team 
Mr. Hutchinson Mr. Blaisdell jNIr. Valentine 

^Von by Swarthmore 
211 



Annual Oratorical (Toatest 

For the Delta Upsiloii Pri^jc 

January 14, 192 i 

James F. Bogardus Herbert L. Hutchinson 

Richard \\'. Slocum 

Decision — $25.00 Prize — Won by Mr. Bogardus 

Judges 

I\Irs. Robert C. Brooks Professor John A. ]\Iiller 

Doctor Samuel C. Palmer 

Ol)e Sophomore — TF^resl)man "IDebate 

For the President's Prize 

November 12, 1920 

Question: "Resolved, That e\'ery freshman and sophomore should be re- 
quired to carrv at least five hours of organized athletics." 

Fresh nuin Team (Affiruu^tive) Sophomore Team (Negative) 

Richmond P. Miller C. Norman Stabler 

Guy W. Davis William W. Joyce 

Kenneth C. Walter James A. Cochrane 

Won by the Negati\'e Team 

Tf^res^mart "Debates 

Question: "Resolved. That we should have a nation-wide open Sunday." 

Team 
Guy W. Davis, Gladys Cisney, Richmond P. jNIiller, Captain 

FRESHMEN vs. CHESTER HIGH SCHOOL 
Chester, A'Tarch Seventh 

Won by Chester 

FRESHMEN vs. TRENTON NORMAL SCHOOL 
Trenton, March Seventeenth 

Won by Trenton 

212 





B U M - 



B R 



»ise 





=^.'f!t=^- 




M E L S 




213 




214 



Swartl)more (Tollese ^tl)leUc ^550cial:lon 

Organized No\'emI)er 14, 1H77 

Motto — "Mens sans in corpore sano" 

Officers ip20-ip2i 



President - 
Vice President 
Secretary - 
Treasurer 



William P. Carter 

Wm. Minton Harvey 

Leon H. Collins 

Edwin M. Joseph 



^tbUtlc (Touncll 



President A. A. 
Treasurer A. A. - - - 
Physical Director 
Graduate Manager 
Football Captain ■ - 
Basketball Captain 
Lacrosse Captain 
Baseball Captain - - - 
Track Captain - - - 
Football Maturger - - - 
Basketball Manager - 
Lacrosse Manager 
Baseball Manager 
Track Manager 
Sicinujiiug Manager - 
Soccer Manager - - - 
Assistant Football Manager 
Asssistant Basketball Manager 
Assistant Lacrosse Manager 
Assistant Baseball Manager - 
Assistant Track Manager - 



William P. Carter 
Edwin M. Joseph 

- E. LeRoy Mercer 
Samuel C. Palmer 

Charles P. Larkin 

William H. Stow 

Grant E. Benjamin 

William P. Carter 

- William P. Kemp 

- George H. Kolb 
William M. Harvey 

Sherman McAllister 

Wayland H. Elsbree 

James F. Bogardus 

- Henry Chase 

Richar'd a. Darlington 

William R. Cisney 

Lanta C. Hastings 

Alban E. Rogers 

- Allen G. Clark 
William P. Lowden 



Swartbtnore (Tollegc ^tbletlc (Tommittee 

Representing the Alumni — Charles C. Miller, Chairman; Charles A. 
Eberle 

Representing tlic Faculty — John A. Miller, E. LeRoy Mercer. Samuel C. 
Palmer 

Representing the Athletic Association — \^^ILLIAM P. Carter 

215 



bearers of tl)e"S" 



FOOTBALL 



Charles P. Larkin, Captain 
Lester Asplundh 
Harold L. Butterworth 
William P. Carter 
James D. Clancey 
Richard J. Cornell 
Frank S. Dudley 
John E. Earp 
Carl J. Geiges 
Frank H. Jackson 
Edwin M. Joseph 



George H. Kolb, Manager 

^^'ILLIAM NiCHOLLS 

\\'iLLiAM P. Kemp 
Warren H. Ogden 
Vincent B. Schneider 
Howard K. Shaw 
William H. Stow 
Alan C. Valentine 
Russell White 
Allen P. Willis 
Russell A. Yarnall 



BASKETBALL 

William H. Stow, Captain Wm. Minton Harvey, Manager 

Grant E. Benjamin George W. Place 

James D. Clancey Russell A. Yarnall 

Charles P. Larkin William P. Kemp 



BASEBALL 



William P. Carter, Captain 
James D. Clancey 
Frank S. Dudley 
CoLLWYN K. Humphreys 
Howard B. Katzenbach 
Charles P. Larkin 



Clarence H. Yoder, Manager 
Warren H. Ogden 
George W. Place 
Russell White 
Joseph F. Wiese 
Alfred J. Young 



LACROSSE 



Clifford R. Gillam, Captain 
John G. Albertson 
J. Garner Anthony 
T. Howard Atkinson* 
Grant E. Benjamin 
Detlev W. Bronk 
Franklin P. Buckman 
Charles B. Coles 
Arthur W. Gardiner 



Gregg D. Reynolds, Manager 
Carl J. Geiges 
William M. Harvey 
George B. Jackson 
Howard L. Johnston 
Edwin M. Joseph 
Albert C. Mammel 
Joseph J. Pugh 
Alan C. Valentine 



TRACK 



Waldo Haldeman, Captain 
Paul W. Chandler 
Thomas L. Eagan 
John E. Earp 
Frank W. Fetter 
Ormsby D. Hampson 



Frank Hoke, Manager 
Henry L Hoot 
William P. Kemp 
David S. Klauder 
George H. Kolb 
Edmund P. Smith 



*Deceased 



Herbert B. Spackman 



216 



^ HfistorY of ^tl)leUc5 at SwarH)mor^ 

P.V KnIlEKT E, SiCNSENDEKFER. 'do 

Some years ago, in the early clays of the present century, Swarthmore was celebrating a 
victory over its time-honored rival, Haverford, an occasion not so frequent in those times. 
Among those called upon for a few words in recognition of the event was Doctor William 
Hyde Appleton, then an active member of the faculty. 

"I am glad to say," he remarked, "that in my long experience at Swarthmore, we have 
always played to win, but not for the winning." 

These words from one of the most revered friends of the college may be taken as the 
.text of the history of athletics at Swarthmore. It has been l5y closely following this idea 
and ideal that Swarthmore today holds a position at the top of its class in all branches of 
healthy sports. 

The athletic history of Swarthmore begins almost with its scholastic records. In the 
early seventies the students were already engaging in outdoor exercises and the college was 
among the first to enter inter-collegiate competition. The Garnet was fortunate in having 
a nearby rival in Haverford and, before the first decade in its athletic history had passed, 
the "Haverford games" were begun on the football field, in themselves among the oldest 
and most spirited of college rivalries. 

As at most colleges and universities, football leads in the field of sports at Swarthmore 
and its record has been one to point to with pride. In its years on the gridiron the Garnet 
has won well earned victories over such big colleges as Pennsylvania, Cornell, to say noth- 
ing of Lafayette, Lehigh, the Navy and others whose student body greatly outnumbers that 
at Swarthmore. And, most of all, the record of victories against Haverford is well on the 
safe side of the Garnet ledger. 

Even before football was played, Swarthmore had a baseball team. For many years,- 
however, this sport was abandoned only to be resumed in recent years when a larger num- 
ber of men to select from made it desirable. In the interim Swarthmore devoted its spring 
athletics to track and lacrosse. 

In lacrosse Swarthmore attained a position in the college world higher than in any 
other branch of athletics, that of undisputed champion of the L'nited States. 

While no such place was ever attained by a Swarthmore track team, the Garnet has al- 
ways held its own in such competition. It has held several intercollegiate state records and 
once a national inter-collegiate mark was broken by a Garnet athlete. 

Basketball and hockey, the winter sports, have had long records. The former, begun 
about a score of years ago, was developed gradually until Swarthmore for several years was 
in a position to claim the championship among Eastern colleges. 

As a part of the record of inter-collegiate athletics at Swarthmore, it should be stated 
that fpr one year Swarthmore voluntarily relinquished such competition. Some dozen years 
ago a sum of money was left to the college on condition that such competition be abandoned. 

The sum w^as large. The problem a difficult one. But Swarthmore decided not to sell 
its liberty. In rejecting the bequest Swarthmore accepted, as an experiment, its terms. One 
year was sufficient to prove to the college authorities that such a course was not to the best 
interests of the development of its undergraduate body. 

Swarthmore has gradually added to its physical athletic equipment through many years. 
It possesses fine gymnasiums for both its young men and young women, two swimming pools 
and several athletic fields, including tennis courts, and both indoor and outdoor running 
tracks. 

Through years of keen competition Swarthmore has held a place at the top of its class 
in the intercollegiate athletic world. 

217 



4^ respects for ^ext ^ear 

By Dr. E. LeRoy jMercer, Coach 




COACH MEBCER 



Witli the graduation of each class, Swarthmore Col- 
lege passes on into the larger field of world affairs a quota 
of men who, in more ways than one, have given much of 
their time, strength and enthusiasm to things worth 
while in the busy life of the institution. This is particu- 
larly true of their support of athletic teams. 

The freshman feels the stress of athletic activitv the 
very day he enters college. Inherited loyalty, sense of 
duty, compulsion from upper-classmen, or love for the 
sport itself maj^ lead him to the athletic field. No matter 
what the motive, however, lo)-alty to Swarthmore soon 
becomes a watchword in his life, and is automatically 
transformed into enthusiasm and active service. Swarth- 
more's teams enjoy wholesome support and reap their 
share of reward in the shape of victories as a result of it. 
On graduation, this grown-up freshman leaves, but his 
spirit is retroacti\e ; and thus is formed a cycle with pow- 
er and endurance. 



To those pessimistically inclined, the graduation of the class of nineteen 
twentv-one might be looked upon as a serious and unsurmountable obstacle to 
athletic success in the 1921-1922 season. And certainly tribute should be paid 
to the unusual number of men from this class who have been prominent on 
all athletic teams, and who have displayed to a marked 
degree determination, willingness to work, and good 
sportsmanship. Not the least of these are the men who 
have worked four years before winning a letter, or those 
who have failed to win letters. The entire group has 
contributed to Swarthmore's athletic success in one of 
the brightest periods of her athletic history. 

However, this is no ground for pessimism. Their 
absence from our midst when the men take the field for 
football practice in nineteen twenty-one will test the zeal 
and measure the stamina of those remaining and the 
freshman class to come. Keener competition for varsity 
positions must stimulate the latent power of those in- 
clined toward inactivit}'. Inability to make the teams in 
other years must cease to be a reason for not becoming a 
candidate again. After all, that powerful something 
which we call college spirit, that something which is tra- 
ditional but acti\'e in the hearts of all Swarthmoreans 
past and present, must be a ruling power and a stimulus 
for more and better victories. dr. palmer 




218 




219 






•■«.jl 



o 



^! 



-r-y 



i§^ ^#-f «^'*Wi^ #Si^ : 



.^4/^#<F*>«ypjpf^ '%s::.#^ii# 



"^'_*t.,^ '■A-*'*? 



1920 IF'ootball 



Captain 

Coach - - - 

Assistant Coach 

Manager 

Assistant Ulanagcr 



End, 

End 

Tackle 

Tackle 

Guard 



The 


Team 


AROLD L. BUTTERWORTH 


Guard 


William P. Kemp 


Center 


Charles P. Larkin 


Quarterback 


Frank S. Dudley 


Halfback 


Alan C. Valentine 


Halfback 



Charles P. Larkin 

E. LeRoy Mercer 

Roy W. Delaplaine 

- George H. Kolb 

William R. Cisney 



Edwin M. Joseph 

Richard J. Cornell 

Carl J. Geiges 

Russell White 

Lester Asplundh 



Fullback 



Russell A. Yarnall 



Substitute 



\\'iLLiAM P. Carter 
James D. Clancey 
Leon H. Collins 
Amos Dotterer 
John E. Earp 
Frank H. Jackson 



\\'ii.liam Nicholls 
Joseph J. Pugh 
Vincent B. Schneider 
Howard K. Shaw 
^^"ILLIAM H.-Stow 
Allen P. Willis 



Charles L. Wilcox 



220 



jF^ootball Review 




CArTAIX LA It 



The 1920 footljall season was one 
of ups and downs for the husky Garnet 
squad, combining flisappointments with 
splenflid victories. Of the eight games 
which made up the heavy scheckile, 
Swarthmore made away with four bat- 
tles, tied one, and lost the remaining 
three. 

The word successful ma}- be writ- 
ten above the names of the eleven, for 
when the Garnet won it won decisively, 
whereas when it lost it was by compara- 
tively small scores, and in spite of the 
fact that the Little Quakers had ex- 
hibited moments of superior playing. 

The greatest handicap to the 
Swarthmore team in the first half of 
the season was the frequent fumbling. 
Thus on several occasions the pigskin 
was lost within the shadow of the goal, 
posts. The shortness of the practice 
period and the several injuries also brought difficulties to the Garnet camp, 
although the latter condition was eased by substitutes who were soon devel- 
oped to fill the vacancies. 

Perhaps the strongest department of the Swarth- 
more team was the line. Led by Captain "Pard" 
Larkin in his old position at tackle the Garnet's first- 
line warriors attacked and defended themseh'es in 
superb fashion. In practically every game the 
Swarthmore line mastered its opponent, making good 
use of its average weight of 184 pounds. This was 
particularly in e\'idence in the Penn and Princeton 
games, where Larkin's men gained more yards 
through the opposing line than those husky elevens 
were able to make through the Garnet wall. 

Xever once did Swarthmore suffer from lack of 
material, as more th&n sixty candidates answered the 
first call to action. 1 Of this number a fourth were 
letter men. Coach iVfercer's chief task was, therefore, 
to pick the smoothest working combination from this 
wealth of material. Li this, "Doc" and his trusty as- mamager koi.b 

221 




rM^ 




^l)e Princeton !^attU 




THE GARNET TALLIES 



i.^p 


















Kr\ 



LARKIN BREAKS THROUGH 




THET SAW A GOOD GAME 

222 



sistant, Roy Delaplaine, showed remarkable \i- 
sion. Tlie team was perhai)s at its best in tlie game 
with Columbia. Then was clearly demonstrated 
the possiliilities of the strong Garnet elexxn — 
fight and team work which had lieen lacking in 
portions of earlier contests. The Garnet would 
have defeated Princeton and Penn had it played 
for the entire forty minutes as it difl in certain 
periods of the game. The close of the battle with 
the Tiger saw the Mercer machine ploughing 
right through the big Princeton line for the only 
touchdown of the season made against that team 
by straight football. However, the splendid work 
of individuals was not enough to make up for 
the evident lack of unified team play and the con- 
tinued driving power necessary to get the pigskin 
across the line. 

After a practice period of less than two 

weeks, the Garnet journeyed forth to Princeton, 

there to encounter its first ri\-al of the season. 

The Garnet eleven showed power, but could not 

concentrate its energies suflSciently to gain the necessary points. Loose 

tackling on the part of Swarthmore greatly assisted the Orange and Black. 

Captain Parkin's men tried great series of forward passes, but of little avail. 

Finally, in the last cjuarter, the Little Quakers got going and by steady line 

bucking ploughed their way across the goal line. The 
final score stood at 17-6 in Princeton's favor. 
Asplundh's punting had been a great feature in hold- 
ing the Tiger in check, since the boots from his toe re- 
peatedly sent the Orange and Black back well o\'er 
sixt}' \'ards. 

Scarcely recovering from the Princeton en- 
counter, the Garnet took on another husky eleven 
when it met Pennsylvania on Franklin Field in the 




VALE.Nl'I.M'; 




annual battle. Swarthmore took the fiek 



m 



liigh 



spirits and a good portion of the packed stands, coat- 





KEMr, '21, END 



THE START OP THE SEASON 



223 




:^-*;-* 




A I'ENX-SWAlrL'lIMORE riLE-UP 



less under the boiling sun, were looking for the Garnet to place the first blot 
on Coach Heisman's record. Howe\er, the jinx seemed to be with the Swarth- 
more team, for a poor kick-off and the loss of Bill Stow through injury were 
the first happenings of the game. Penn scored two touchdowns in the first 
half, but both of these were largely aided by Garnet fumbles. The game 
scarcely had a dull moment. Even when Swarthmore was trailing, 14-0, it 
kept the big Penn cheering section in an.xiety by its varied display of forward 
passes and sudden bursts, largely by means of the open field running of Russ 
Yarnall. During the first three periods Mercer's men outplayed Heisman's 
proteges, the Garnet's spectacular work being marred by fumljles. Thus, 
while beaten b}- the Red and Blue, the wonderful exhibition of line plunging 
and open field running displayed by Swarthmore demonstrated that the Penn 

warriors were not three touch- 
downs superior to Captain 
Parkin's men. Asplundh again 
thrilled the crowd by his mar- 
\elous ]5unting. Twice the 
Garnet fumbled within ten 
}'ar(ls of the g'oal line, and thus 
it happened that the final whis- 
tle founfl Penn holding the big 
portion of a 21-0 score. 

The champion Stevens 
eleven opened up the home sea- 
son on Swarthmore Field and 
dealt the Garnet a jolt by hand- 
ing out a 14-7 score, taking the 
14 points for themselves. It 
is safe to say that fumbling and 
loose tackling were again the 
chief factors in the Garnet de- 
224 




GEIGES, '22, QUARTER 
Captain-Elect 




JOSEPH, ■21. GUARD 




TIIH (iARXKT GAINS OFF TACKLE 

feat. Swarthniore retrieved itself, but not sufficiently, when in the final quar- 
ter Geiges entered the game and launched an aerial attack which ended in 
Kemp's taking the ball across the line for a touchdown. Stevens' big dele- 
gation of rooters, numbering more than four hundred students, did much to 
spur on its team to victory. 

Coach Mercer's men then took a brace and on the following Saturda}' 
smothered the Johns Hopkins eleven, 41-0, on the Baltimore field. On that 
day the Garnet machine worked perfectly, and the first smile of the season ap- 
peared on Coach Mercer's face. Swarthmore was clearly the master and read- 
ily overcame the Baltimoreans' opposition. Swarthmore again launched an 
aerial attack and Kemp and Butterworth, playing the wing positions, scooped 
in three passes for touchdowns. 

On the last Saturday in October came the severest jolt of the whole sea- 
son, and a point which might be termed the crisis. Franklin and Marshall 
completeh' upset the dope bucket by holding the Garnet to a 0-0 tie on Swarth- 




TlIE FRESH AFFORD AMUSEMENT 
22.5 




■ ASPLDNDH IN ACTION 

more Field. This was the poorest exhiljition of the season on tlie part of 
Larkin's men. The Lancastrians were not especially strong, bnt the Garnet 
was lacking in the necessary drive to put the ball across. To be sure there 
were moments of good pla}'ing, but on the whole the exhibition was a poor 
one from the Swarthmore standpoint. 

The turning point had come. Coach Mercer drilled his men to the very 
limit, and the team took on the do-or-die spirit. With this determination 
Swarthmore met the fast Columbia team in New York City and handed the 
Metropolitans a decided beating, by a 21-7 score. Yarnall thrilled the Xew 
Yorkers b)' his spectacular open field running. In the first period he demon- 
strated his abilty in this department by going sixty-tive yards through the 
whole Columbia eleven for the first score. Asplundh wfas also a hero, scoring 
two marvelous touchdowns. Captain Larkin featured by his smashing play- 
ing, while Valentine delighted his home-town worshippers by his fighting ex- 
hibition. The victor}'- was a well-earned one. The Garnet was satisfied. It 
had aeain struck its stride and \Aas determined to continue it. 




DKl. AWAKE 1'1H(\"ES EASi' 
226 




h. 



^^^T^MHtaJ^H 






HUHKAY FdU (lUIt SIlll-: 



'.«■ 



The game with Delaware on Swarthmore Field proved far too easy for 
the big Garnet warriors, so Coach Mercer sent in great hosts of substitutes 
and they, too, scored. It was at this time that Hoke became imm(M'talized bv 
scoring his famous touchdown. The day was a veritable festivity for the 
scrubs, for many of them saw their first real action in a Garnet jersey. The 
records fail to show just how many happy hearts Coach Mercer made b\' his 






CORNELL, '23, CENTER 
227 



WHITE. '22. HALFBACK 




YAKNALL, '22, FULI-BAIK 



substitutions, as tliey came so fast that tlie offi- 
cial scorer could not record the changes rapidly 
enough. Ap])roximate]y forty men were given 
an opportunity to take part in this steam-roller- 
ing of the Delaware boys with the highest score 
ever run up on Swarthmore Field. 

The following week brought — 

The Trii'mph Over Haverford 

It was on that glorious November after- 
noon that a heavy, onrushing, well-drilled, fast 
and veteran machine, clad in Garnet jerseys, 
sent Ha\'erford's Scarlet and Black eleven 
trailing, in the season's annual Quaker football 
classic, by a 28 to 6 score. The fading sun was 
setting upon the 1920 season and left the 
Garnet following satisfied, flying the Pennons 
of \'ictory. 

Against the Orthodox, Swarthmore played 
a game fit to rank with any rival in the annals 
of the 1920 season. The team, led by the vet- 
eran Captain Larkin, played football as it 
should be played — the game of a machine. 
Good plays abounded — thrilling runs, brilliant passes, flashy open play, soar- 
ing punts, wide end runs, fine tackling and good interference — in short, every- 
thing that goes to make up the spectacular football game of modern years. 

The great power of the Swarthmore machine can be set forth b)- a few 
figures. Fourteen times the Garnet gained first downs, while Haverford 
could register just half that number. In ground gained, Larkin's men made 
248 yards as against 140 for Coach Bennett's pupils. Only in the matter of 
completed forward passes did Haverford excel. 

The scoring- opened in the first period. After a few minutes of hard 
fighting, Swarthmore took the ball on downs at the Garnet 25-yard mark 
after the stalwart line had held so grimly that Haverford's smash could not 
net a badly-needed yard on the fourth down. On the first pla}' after that, 
Yarnall skirted left end, warded off tackier after tackier, and raced to the 
goal line for a touchdown, 
afterwards kicking the goal. 
Scarcely had the Garnet 
throats rested when Russ 
AMiite started off his brilliant 
day b}- scooping up a fumble 
and eUiding every Haverford 
tackier for a second touch- 
down. 

Haverford then took a 
brace and by a series of for- 
ward passes took the ball al- 
most to the goal line. How- 




THK MnR.MNG AFTER 



228 




will liO .slAiriS OIT FOK A TOUCHIMIWX 

e\er, when the Main Liners tried to break through the Swarthmore line for a 
score they found themselves up against the impossible, and their attempts failed. 

The second half found the old rivals fighting harder than ever. The Red 
and Black again resorted to an aerial attack, but suddenly changed their 
minds when big Captain Larkin intercepted a forward pass on his own 40- 
vard line. Then the powerful Asplundh was called on, and he. alternating 
with Yarnall and White, ripped and tore to the one-yard mark, where he 
charged through for the third Garnet tally. 

Swarthmore's final score came in the fourth period. Earp sent a splendid 
pass to Jackson who scooped it in great style. That put the pigskin on 
Haverford's 20-yard line, and then Eai-p cut loose a burst of speed that made 
the Orthodox tacklers look as though they were standing still, while he shot 
around left end and scored a touchdown. Haverford fought grimly on and 
was finally rewarded with a touchdown, after gaining the ball on Swarth- 
more's 20-yard line on a bad punt. They missed the goal and the final score 
stood at 28 to 6. 

This spectacular victory marked the successful culmination of a season 
and the close of the collegiate football careers of several of the Garnet main- 




stays. The great career of Captain Larkin was at an end. lie had played 
his last game in a manner Ijefitting the finish of four years of exceptional 
gridiron l)rillancv, two seasons of which were spent in the leadership of men 
whose highest confidence he always held. Valentine was to be doubly re- 
warded f(jr his S])lendid 
work \\'ith honorable men- 
tion in Walter Camp's All- 
American football picking. 
Stow. Clancey, Kemp and 
Joseph had also played 
their last games for the 
Garnet and had covered 
themselves with the honor 
due them. For the others of 
the squad it was a splendid 
inspiration to carry the Gar- 
net standard to even greater 
heights next year, promises 
of which seem likely of ful- 
fillment under the capable 
leadership of Captain-elect 
Carl Geiges, the Garnet's 
l^rilliant quarterback, who is 
declared tO' be one of the best 
generals in the game, ^^'ith 
the return of such stars as 
Yamall, White. Carter, 
Dudley, Asplundh, Earp, 
Butterworth, Cornell and 
Jackson, assisted by a host 
of other ambitious warriors, 
the success of next year's 
season seems assured. 

^. Varsity letters this )-ear 

were awarded to Charles 
P. Larkin, Captain; George 
H. Kolb, Manager ; William 
H. Stow, Alan C. Valentine, 
William P. Kemp, Edwin 
' M. Joseph, Russell A. Yar- 
nall, ^\'illiam P. Carter, Rus- 
sell White, Carl J. Geiges, 
Frank S. Dudley, John E. 
Earp, Harold L. Butter- 
worth, Frank H. Jackson, 
Lester Asplundh, Richard J. 
Cornell and \\' i 1 1 i a m 
^^ Xicholls. 




ASPLUNDH 



-IX O'CLOCK 



230 





JACKSON, '22, END ' RVfV 

Ol)(i Scl)c6ule 

October 2 — Princeton at Princeton 
October 9 — Pennsylvania at Franklin Field 
October 16 — Stevens at Swarthmore 
October 23 — Johns Hopkins at Baltimore - 
October 30 — F. and M. at Sw^arthmore - 
November 6 — Columbia at New York 
November 13 — Delaware at Swarthmore - 
November 20 — Haverford at Haverford 

Totals ----- 







BUTTERWDRTH, 
S. 

6 

- o 

7 

- 41 

o 

- 21 



- 28 
165 



END 

Opp. 

17 

21 

14 
O 
O 

7 

o 

_6 

65 




. ■ 




■ 


J 


1 


! 


t^'^^'v^ 


W/ 


M 


■ 


tiy^ 




1 


g^i 


ijr 


j; 




!■ 


H^V^^^H 




i: 









DUDI.EV, 'U2, TACKLE 



CAKTEU. '22, HALEBACK 



WILLIS, '23, TACKLE 





f 



!«?^> 




'^ 



^^,*»- 



STOW, '21, HALFBACK 



SCHNEIDER, '23, QUARTEK 
2.32 



CLANCEY, '21, EXD 






THE SQUAD 
233 




THE CHEERING SQl'AD AT IIA^•ERFORD 







AROUND END 



234 




\> 



Vv., \ ^ 



%vv: 



235 




1921 ^^asKetball 



Captain --------- \\'illiam H. Stow 

Coach - - -- - - - - - Doctor Lou Martin 

Manoecr -------- Wm. Minton Harvey 

Assistant Manager ------ Lanta C. Hastings 

The Team 

Forward --------- George W. Place 

forward -------- William P. Kemp 

Center -------- Grant E. Benjamin 

Guard -------- Russell A. Yarnall 

Guard -------- Charles P. Larkin 

^ Substitutes 

\A'illiam p. Carter Lester Asplundh 

John G. Dieterle Waldemar Wood 

James D. Clancey Russell A. Heath 



236 



t^asketball !5\eview 

For the most successful season on the Swarthmore spcjrts calcmlar ol the 
past year, the laurels seem to go to the basketball team. Starting off with a 
string of six straight victories, the Garnet (|uintet exhibited a brand of basket- 
ball such as has not been seen at Swarthmore in many a day. Out of a sched- 
ule of fourteen games, nine victories were chalked up, while three of the five 
losses were sustained by close scores. 

Coach Lou Martin had a wealth of material to pick from, there being six 
letter men on hand at the start, besides the scrubs. 

The season opened with a game against Johns Hopkins at Baltimore. It 
was an easy victory, score 30-14, and gave confidence to the team. The first 
home game was with Dickinson, and again the Garnet handed out the count, 
the Carlisle boys leaving with a 28-22 score to haunt them. Then the husky 
Bucknell team journeyed hopefully to Swarthmore, but sad were their hearts 
when they left after having been literally toyed with by their fast opponents, 
to the tune of 22-11. Swarthmore found little difficulty in trouncing Franklin 
and Marshall, 26-18, on the Lancastrians' court. The next contest was with 
West Point, and defeat was feared in some quarters, but even the fast cadets 
could not hold the Garnet in check. Swartlimore won by a 28-18 score. 

The newspapers now began to sit up and take notice at this long string 
of wins. The decisive victory over Ursinus during e.xam week increased the 
championship talk ; but the tide was soon to turn. Lafayette beat us on their 
own floor by a score of 23-16. It is said that this was partly due to the box- 






YARN.M.I.. '22. GfARD 
C!ilir;iiii*Eleft 



COACH MARTIN 



CAPTAIN STOW 
237 



like Lafayette floor. Ho\ve\'er, the Garnet stuck continued on the downwarcl 
trend. 

This second defeat, though, was hardly a defeat. It was played against 
Princeton on our floor, and it is the one game of the year that will stand out 
clearly in the memories of the Garnet fans for many moons. Not one of the 
hundreds of rooters who jammed the Hall gymnasium to the very doors has 
lost the picture of that Swarthmore c[uintet fighting every minute, playing 
lietter almost than they knew how to, and finally emerging defeated but un- 
concjuered. It was a one-handed shot in the extra period that won the game 
for Princeton, and the final score stood 33-31. 




THE FRESHMAN TEA.M 



Almost in the same breath came another one of the same heart-breaking 
variety. Rutgers further jolted the Garnet hopes by grabbing a 25-24 win 
in an extra-period contest. It is only fair to say, however, that even Rutgers 
fans concede that we played the better game, but the inability of the referee to 
handle the game properly interfered seriously with Swarthinore's chances. 

The team hit its stride again the following week, when it downed the 
Albright five 24-22. Lehigh then bowed to the Garnet on their floor by a 
score of 17-11. Next followed two more setbacks, both to superior teams. 
Hopefully, Swarthmore met the Penn champions on the latter's floor, and 
though the Garnet displayed "the real fighting spirit," according to The Penn- 
sylvanian, thev were unable to turn their shots at the basket into tallies, pulling 
the short end of a 29-17 count. After a tiresome all-day ride to State Col- 
lege, Swarthmore engaged the Blue and White in the annual match. This 
time they were really outclassed, and lost to the champion State five, 34-11. 

The season came to a close on i\iarch ele\-enth, w hen Hicksite and Ortho- 
dox met in the Swarthmore gym. Haverford displayed a bit of form which 
only served to arouse the Garnet's fighting spirit, and caused the latter to 
romp away with a 21-13 victory. Thus ended a great season. 

238 



At tlie start of tlie seasnn, there was uneasiness in 
the Garnet camp over the inahility of Captain "Bill" 
Stow to take the floor, on account of injury. However, 
Coach Martin set a new comhination to work, and the 
result was the winning- comhination that has heen de- 
scrihed. Stow's disability was at length overcome and 
he managed to break into one of the season's closing 
contests. 

Benjamin, taking Stow's place at center, stood out 
conspicuously in every game. • He readily adapted him- 
self to the new position, and his jumping gave the Garnet 
many of its good start-offs. Not only was he the high 
man in field-goal tallying, but he- looked after the Gar- 
net's interests from the free line. Kemp deserves credit 
for his performances. His first year as a varsity regular, 
he fitted into the Garnet combination admirably and 
showed himself to be one of the fastest men on the team. 
Place finished his college cage career with an exhibition 
of speed and skill that eclipsed all his pre\-ious work. 

The fine qualit)^ of Larkin's plajdng throughout the season is indicated 
in a report of the Lehigh ]>aper on the big guard's work in that game. "Sel- 
dom ha\'e the students had the opportunity of viewing such beautiful skill as 
was exhibited by Larkin." "Pard" rounded out a great career with his 
splendid work at guard, and averaged a two-pointer per game into the bargain. 

"Yarnall played a great game at guard," commented The Pennsylvanian 
in speaking of his work in the Penn game, and this could be said of every one 




HAH\ i:v, ■It, MA.\.\GEK 






r.AKKIX, -21. ClAIM) 



BENJAMIN. -21, CENTER 

239 



KEMP, '21, FORWARD 



of his exhibitions. Fast, and always in the game giving his very laest. Russ 
is well quaHfied to captain next year's team, of which he will be the mainstay. 
He has caged twenty-one field goals during the season. 

While practically the same five men represented Swarthmore in all the 
games, a few ambitious aspirants broke into the frays, and displayed them- 
selves commendably. Among these \Aere Carter, Dieterle, Asplundh and 
^\'ood, all of whom will probalily see future action in Garnet jerseys. 



January 


7- 


January 


14- 


January 


15- 


January 


22- 


January 


29- 


February 


5- 


February 


12- 


February 


18- 


February 


19- 


February 


25- 


February 


26- 


March 


2- 


March 


5- 


March 


II- 



Results of ti)e. Sc\^i.i>uli. 

-Johns Hopkins at Baltimore _ - - 
-Dickinson at Swarthmore - - - 

-Bucknell at Swarthmore - - - - 
-Franklin and Marshall at Lancaster 
-Army at West Point . - - . 

-Ursinus at Swarthmore _ _ - 

-Lafayette at Easton - - - - - 
-Princeton at Swarthmore - - - 
-Rutgers at New Brunswick _ . _ 

-Albright at Swarthmore _ - - 

-Lehigh at South Bethlehem - - - 

-University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia 
-Pennsylvania State College at State College 
-Haverford at Swarthmore - - - 

Totals ------- 



s. 


Opp. 


30 


14 


- 28 


22 


2.2 


II 


■ 26 


18 


28 


18 


- 26 


12 


16 


23 


- 31 


33 


24 


25 


- -24 


22 


17 


1 1 


■ 17 


29 


II 


34 


■ 21 


13 



321 



28; 




1^ 


i 




1 




i' 


TV 





WOOD. '24, SUBSTITUTE 



240 




241 







1920 r^aseball 



Captain -------- William P. Carter 

Coach ---------- Y.. ]. Lafitte 

Manager - - - - - - - - ' Clarence H. Yoder 

Assistant Manager ------ Wayland H. Elsbeee 

The Team 
ritchcr --------- ^VARREN H. Oguen 

Pitcher __--___- James D. Clancey 

Pitclier -------- George L. Earnshaw 

Catcher - - - - - - - Vincent B. Schneider 

First Base -------- Alfred J. Young 

Catcher ------- Collwyn K. Humphreys 

Third Base -------- Russell White 

Second Base ------- Frank S. Dudley 

Second Base -------- George \\'. Place 

Shortstop -------- Clarence H. Yoder 

Left Field - - -- - - - -J. Frederic Wiese 

Center Field ------- William P. Carter 

Right Field ------- Charles P. Larkin 



242 



^iBaseball Review 

Tlie 1920 1iase1)all nine went through the longest and hardest schedule 
that has confronted a Garnet team for many a year. The results give Captain 
Carter's diamond sharks a standing of slightly better than 500 per cent., since 
they copped nine games out of the season's total of seventeen. Throughout 
the entire spring tlie team played good ball, losing often by close scores, and 
fieing blanked only once. 

That baseball is still the great American game was e\'idenced in the large 
turnout which faced Doctor E. J. Lafitte, former I^etroit star and present 
coach of the Garnet squad. The front campus early resounded with the 
cracks of batted balls and the time soon came for Swarthmore to take the 
diamond at Bethlehem. 

The ]M-actice season had been a little too short, however, and Captain 
Carter's batsmen fell before the Lehigh baseballers, 5 to 2. Three days later 
Swarthmore came back strong and exhibited baseball of the mid-season brand, 
defeating the strong Princeton nine at Princeton, by an exact re\'ersal of the 
result of the first game, 5-2. The Garnet still continued its playing away 
from home, but nevertheless came through "with another victory, this time 
over Johns Hopkins in a very close game. After the twenty-seventh out the 
box score credited Coach Lafitte's boys with a 5-4 victory. 

On April 14 the home season was formall}^ opened and the Garnet nine 
replied to the cheers from the stands by handing Ursinus a decided beating 
by a 9-3 score. Coach Lafitte was happy over this opportunity for the boys 
to g-et a little extra batting practice. 





i:i.si;ki:e, '21, MAN.VGEU 




C.M'TAIX CAKIl;!; 



COACH LAFITTE 



243 





FIRST BASE 



The first of the pair of games with Pennsylvania came next in order. 
Neither team played any startling game, and Swarthmore bowed to the elder 
Quakers, 6-4. The Garnet started a rally late in the game which gave prom- 
ises of victory, but the Philadelphia boys braced and put an end to Swarth- 
more hopes. 

Having" acc|uired the traveling habit, the Swarthmore scjuacl boarded a 
train and proceeded tO' invade the center of the Keystone state. Bucknell was 





CI„\XCEY, '21 



'A PAIR OF PITCHERS" 
244 



BARNSIIAW , 



the first opponent, and the J-ewislnirg boj's proni]>tly fell before Otjden's 
baffling curves, 5-3. At State College the Garnet met a reverse. Svvarth- 
more put up a splendid game, but was bettered by the Blue and White, 8 to 5. 

The schedule next brought the University of Pennsylvania hoys to the 
Garnet lair, but again Swarthmore was forced to yield to the Red and Blue. 
Again the Garnet started a rally, but again the Big Quakers stopped it before 
victory was lost to them. The final tallies were: Penn, 4; Swarthmore, 2. 

The warm sunshine of May day brought new strength to Swarthmore's 
nine, New York University being dealt a 6-0 defeat in short order. This was 
the only shut-out which Swarthmore recorded 'during the season. Then up 
from the Sunny South came the University of North Carolina team, but they 
gained only a 3-1 defeat while on the Garnet diamond. This game was one 
of the best of the season. 

Captain Carter's team was now traveling the high road of the schedule 
and a hasty visit to New York netted a Columbia baseball for the trophy 
case. The score was 8-6, with the Metropolitan boys trailing. Haverford 
had invited the Swarthmore nine to pay it a visit, and so the Garnet batsmen 
made their way to the Main Line college. This game pro\-ed a great swatfest, 
and, after tiring of running around the bases, Swarthmore halted at 17. the 
Orthodox having meanwhile gained 3 runs. 

The good omens were disappearing and Carter's nine took the count 
twice within the next week. At Easton, Lafayette spoiled the Garnet record 
by sending the boys away with a 4-1 defeat. The next game was with the 
Navy at Annapolis, and it was from the bats of the midshipmen that Swarth- 
more received her worst defeat. The Navy pitcher bafifled the Swarthmore 
sluggers while the Quaker pitchers could do no more than allow a 7-0 victor}^ 
for the boys in blue. 



srS' 






VVHllE, ■■SI. iillKIl liA.Sl-; 



WlESli, -11, LEFT FIELD 
245 



LAKKl.N. ■■11. lUGUT FILLD 



Swarthmore went after big prizes ag-ain and defeated the L'nixersity of 
Pittsburgh aggregation on Alumni Field. The boys from the Smoky City 
could do no better than accept an 11-3 defeat. The last two games of the 
season were disastrous to the Garnet's record. Delaware managed to get the 
credit for a t,-2 win after thirteen innings of battle, while the strong Alumni 
team of celebrated past masters under Bill Durbin as pitcher accomjilished a 
y-;^ victory, closing the Garnet season for another year. 

Throughout the season Captain Carter played a fine game in the outer 
garden, as well as doing some effective clean-up work with the bat. "Pep" 
Young pro\-ed himself a king of college first-sackers, scarcelv missing a ball 
in his direction. Manager Yoder wound up his collegiate diamond career with 
a good season at shortstop. \\'iese and Larkin also demonstrated their ability 
at coaxing in fly balls, besides being responsible for a number of the Garnet 
tallies. Humphreys celebrated his freshman year by earning his letter for 
doing most of the work behind the bat in very creditable style. Ogden and 
Clancey put in good seasons on the mound, the combination inflicting uneasi- 
ness on dislikers of either right or left-handed pitchers. 

The opening of the 192 1 season finds the Garnet diamond fax'ored with 
almost the entire team of last }'ear. Captain "Xick" Carter is again at the 
helm. Young's loss to the ])ig leagues is regretted, though success is wished to 
him. The few other \-acancies will be readily filled by the diamond sage. Coach 
Lafitte. Thus, from all indications, another successful season lies ready for 
Swarthmore liaseball annals to record. 









DIIDLKY, '22. SECOND BASE 



PLACE, '21, SEi'dMi l-.ASIO 

246 



SCHNEIDER, '23. CATCHER 



April 
Apr 



April lo- 



Apr 



Apr 



3- 
6- 



1 14- 



April 17- 



23- 



April 24- 
April 28- 
May I- 
May 4- 
May 5- 
May . 8- 
May 1 2- 
May 15- 
May 22- 
June 3- 
June 4- 



t>\ftsults of t^e $cl)46ule 

■Lehigh at Bethlehem - - - - 
■Princeton at Princeton . - - - 

■Johns Hopkins at Baltimore - - - 
Ursinns at Swarthmore - - _ _ 
-University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia 
-Bucknell at Lewishurg _ - - . 

-Penn State at State College - - - 
■University of Pennsylvania at Swarthmore - 
■N. Y. U. at Swarthmore 
University of North Carolina at Swarthmore 
•Columbia at New York - - - - 
■Ha\'erforcl at Haverford - - - - 
-Lafayette at Easton _ . - - 

-Navy at Annapolis ----- 
-University of Pittsburgh at Swarthmore - 
-Delaware at Newark ----- 
-Alumni at Swarthmore - ' - 

Totals - - - 



s. 


Opp 


2 


5 


5 


2 


5 


4 


9 


3 


4 


6 


5 


3 


5 


8 


2 


4 


6 





3 


I 


8 


6 


17 


3 


I 


4 





7 


II 


3 


2 







3 


7 



88 



69 






BUTTERWORTH, '22, SHORTSTOP 



.MEAKS. '21. PITCHER 
247 




POWELL, '21, PITCHER 




2-J8 



^R-AGK 




249 




1920 I3racK 



Captain - -,- - - - - - - Waldo Haldeman 

Coai-h --------- E. LeRoy Mercer 

Manager ---------- Frank Hoke 

Assistant Manager ------ James F. Bogardus 

Tlie Team 

Waldo Haldeman John Earp 

David Klauder Thomas L. Eagan 

Edmund Smith (Gordon Smith 

Henry Evans George Kolb 

Frank Fetter Ormsby Hampson 

Henry Hoot Paul Sharpless 

William Kemp Herbert Spackman 

Edward Atkins Earl Thoenen 
Lester Asplundh 



250 



I5rack !^eview 




CAPTAIN HALDEMAN 



Under the able coaching of Doctor LeRoy 
Mercer, Swarthmore's track team went tlirougli a 
very successful seas(jn. Although the Garnet 
track men ca])ture(l nu liigh lienors in the I'enn 
relays or the Middle Atlantics, the team was very 
successful in the dual meets, losing only one and 
that by a very close margin. Swarthmore's vir- 
tual win over Rutgers, winner of the Middle 
States Meet, proved the strength of the team and 
finished up the 1920 season in a praise-worthy 
manner. 

Opening the schedule at Baltimore, with 
Johns Hopkins, Swarthmore started out with a 
well-earned \'ictory by the score of 58 to 54. Al- 
though the Baltimoreans showed their superiority 
on the track, the Garnet overcame their oppo- 
nents in the field events in such a masterly manner 
as to gain the victory. A week later Swarth- 
more's quartette of quarter-milers went to the 
Penn Relays, but were unable to draw better than 
fifth place in a race won by Rutgers in record-break- 
ing time. It was at the hands of Delaware that the 
Garnet track men were forced to bow to their oppo- 
nents, the first and only time in the four dual meets 
of the season. Not until the last event had been run 
did Delaware emerge the \-ictor. The score stood 
67 to 59. The Newark boys, however, were forced 
to the very limit to win, breaking their discus, quar- 
ter-mile, 220-yard dash, and javelin records. Swarth- 
more came back strong after this setback and handed 
Haverford an overwhelming defeat, 8oi% to 31^. 
Lack of individual stars prevented the Garnet from 
making a conspicuous showing in the Middle States 
Meet held at Rutgers, Mercer's men scoring only 
eight points and sixth place in the meet. 

It was only through a technicality that the Lit- 
tle Quakers were officially prevented from claiming 
the victory which they won at Swarthmore in the 
last contest of the season against Rutgers, the win- 
ner of the Middle Atlantic States Meet. Rutgers 

251 




MANAGER BOGARDUS 



was leading the (iarnet by a 54 to 50 score with tlie 
javelin throw, the final e\-ent, yet to be finished. 
.\splundh and Hampson had in their first attempts 
with the javelin outdistanced their op]DOnents by 
}'ards, and each contestant had but two throws to 
take, when the only available ja\elin broke. This 
prevented the completion of the e\'ent and the con- 
summation of a 58 to 54 \'ictory for Swarthmore. 

Among the features of the season was the run- 
ning of Frank F'etter in the mile and half-mile 
e\ents. He placed first in the mile event in both 
the Delaware and Rutgers meets against strong op- 
position. 

"Eddie" Smith, although he had been away 
from the track for two seasons, was a good point 
getter for the Garnet, winning consistently in the 
two-mile event. Captain Haldeman, Klauder and 
Hoot, the other senior members of the team also 
gained laurels for themselves and Swarthmore by 
their consistent place-winning performances. 

"Bill" Kemp, captain-elect of the 1921 team, 
proved to be the best all-around star of the season. In the final meet of the 
season "Bill" extended his versatility, winning the broad-jump and at the 
same time establishing a new college record at 22 feet, 6^ inches. Kemp 




^1^1, (.'aiiraiii-l'Jh'cr 






SPACKMAN, '23 



ASPLUNDH, '23 

252 



THOENEN, '23 



won the pole vault in every dual meet, and tied for 
first in the Middle States Meet. His best height was 
1 1 feet, 6 inches, made against Rutgers. 

"Herb" Spackman in his lirst year at Swarth- 
more proved his value in the 220-yard and quarter- 
mile events. His scoring in the former in the Johns 
Hopkins Meet clinched the competition for Swarth- 
more, while his placing first in the latter e\'ent in the 
Rutg'ers meet was one of the factors that aided in the 
Garnet's work against the Middle Atlantic States 
champions. Incidentally, in this race Spackman 
ecjualed the Freshman record of 51 3-5 seconds. An- 
other freshman on last year's team, who showed abil- 
ity in the field events was Asplundh, Late in the sea- 
son he showed Coach Mercer his ability to throw the 
javelin. Twice the freshman javelin record fell be- 
fore this husky first-year man, first with a throw of 
149 feet and later he reached the distance of 151 feet. 

George Kollj, a lanky hig'h jumper and hurdler, 
was one of the developments of the season. Without previous track experi- 
ence he rounded himself into a steady point winner. Hampson, a letter man, 
featured in most meets with a first in the high jump. His best leap over the 
bar was at 5 feet, 1 1 inches. Also, in the last meet of the year he aided 
Asplundh in outdistancing the Rutgers representatives in the javelin throw, 




SHARPLE.S.S, 





which pro\'ecl to be the deciding event in this unofficial victory. "Johnnie" 
Earp collected points for the Garnet with the javelin as well as boosting his 
team-mates to victory by means of his ability as a shot-putter and broad- 
jumper. 





Results of tl)e Schedule 


S. Opp. 


April 


24 — Johns Hopkins at Batimore - - - 


- 58 54 


May 


5 — Delaware at Newark, Del. _ - - 


59 67 


May 


7 — Haverford at Swarthmore - _ . 


- 8o>< 3i>^ 


May 


15 — Sixth Place in Middle States Track Meet 




May 


22 — Rutgers at Swarthmore . . _ 


Unfinished 



Totals -.- - - - - - - 19754 



i52>^ 




HAMPSON OVER THE TOP 



254 



UCRQSSL 




255 




1920 lacrosse 



Captai)i -------- Clifford R. Gillam 

Coach --------- Harold S. Page 

Manager --------- Gregg D. Reyolds 

Assistant Manager - - - - - Sherman McAllister 

The Team 
Goal -------- J. Garner Anthony 

Inside Home ------- John G. Albertson 

Outside Home ------- Albert C. Mammel 

First Attack - - - - -- - - - Carl J- Geiges 

Secomt Attack -------- George B. Jackson 

Third Attack - - - - - - - T. Howard Atkinson 

Center -------- Grant E. Benjamin 

Third Defense ------- Charles B. Coles 

Second Defense ------ Howard L. Johnston 

First Defense ------- Clifford R. Gillam 

Coz'cr Point ------- Alan C. Valentine 

Point - - - - - - - - - Edwin M. Joseph 

Stdystitntes — Joseph J. Pugh, Allen P. ^^'ILLIS, Franklin P. Buckman, 
Arthur Gardiner. 



256 



Xacro5$e Review 




■AriAI.N CII.I.AM 



The lacrosse team in 1920 was Swarth- 
more's only major sport representative which 
did not rate better than 500 per cent, on the 
season's results. This was perhaps due to a 
lack of experienced material around which to 
build a team, especially for the important post 
of goal tender. The redeeming- feature of the 
season was not the fact that the Garnet handed 
two defeats to its old ri\-al, Penn, but rather 
in that it resulted in training a large squad of 
green candidates into clever handlers of the 
sticks, capable of fast team play. This benefi- 
cent result will show in the lacrosse teams of 
the next few years. 

Swarthmore undergraduates patronized 
the Indian game to an unusual extent last year, 
almost one-half a hundred men answering 
Coach Page's call. Very few of this host, how- 
ever, had ever attempted the game before, and 
hence the short practice period did not sevvt 
to place the Garnet in any strong position when it came time to cross sticks 
for the opening game with the fast Cornell team. Captain Gillam's men re- 
ceived a 7-0 shut-out in the hard-fought battle, but emerged with experience 
which was to serve them in good stead in the next game. 

The next week the Garnet made its annual pilgrimage to Franklin Field 
and there bettered the Red and Blue, two goals to one. Swarthmore showed 
its decided superiority, allowing Penn no more than three shots at the goal. 
One of the biggest setbacks of the season also came in this same week. Cap- 
tain Gillam and his stickmen invaded Annapolis and there fell before the at- 
tack of the embryo U. S. Navy, taking the count at 10 to o. This game was 
decided, however, not by superior fight, but by superior condition and train- 
ing. The first half saw the ball as much in Navy as in Garnet territory with 
practically an equality in the number of shots. The second half demonstrated 
the advantages of the hard, outdoor life of the would-be seamen, as well as the 
results of a longer practice period. The Middies steadily boosted their score 
from an advantage of two points to the final standing at lo-o. It is to the 
credit of the Swarthmore team that the Navy coach complimented them on the 
great scrap they had put up against a superior and more experienced team. 

The two succeeding contests saw the Garnet at its best. Rutgers was de- 
cisively steam-rollered bv an 8 to 2 score in which the Swarthmore attack had 



2.57 



things pretty well its own way. Then the Penn twelve journe_\-ed out to 
Swarthmore seeking- revenge, but again the}- were compelled to take the rear 
position, as the Little Quakers got away with a 4-1 victory. 

The team met an unexpected reverse at the hands of the fast Ste\-ens 
team on the Hobokenites field. The Garnet was a bit handicapped as a result 
of injuries sustained in the Penn fracas and hence could not display its cus- 
tomary teamwork, losing b}' a 3-1 score. This appeared to be the turning- 
point in the team's record for in remaining fi\e games Swarthmore could reg- 
ister onl)' one victory. However, the teams met were unusualh- strong, among 
them being the Crescent Club of New York and the skilled Canadian stick- 
men representing the University of Toronto. Swarthmore's trium]5h over 
Plobart brought delight to the Garnet camp, since that team had defeated the 
Cornell bunch which had put the first blot on the Swarthmore team's record. 

Individual mention should be made of the work of Captain Gillam. 
Throughout the season he led his men in every game, setting them a fine ex- 
ample by his skillful playing. Valentine, Johnston and Geiges, three of the 
men who made their letters though they had never played before, also deserve 
commendation. Joseph and Coles on the defense, and Afammel, Jackson and 
Atkinson on the attack, pla3fed steady games throughout the season. Ben- 
jamin's stellar playing stood out in every game and makes him a splendid 
leader for the 1921 team. 






GEIGE.S, '22. AT-IACK 



JOSEPH, '21, DEFENSE 

2oS 



BENJAMIN. '21. ATTACK 
Captain-Elect 





KATZENBACH, '21. ATTACK 



ANTHONY, '22, GOAL 





MAMMT3L, '21, ATTACK 



McAllister, '2i, manager 



259 



Results of 11)0. Scl)<i6uU 



April 5 — Cornell at Swarthmore - - - - 

x\pril lo — University of Pennsj'lvania at Philadelphia 

April 17 — Navy at Annapolis _ _ - - 

April 24 — Rutgers at Swarthmore - - - 

April 29 — University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia 
May I — Stevens at Hobo ken - - - - 
May 8 — Johns Hopkins at Baltimore - - - 

May 15 — Crescent Athletic Club at New York 

J\Iay 20 — Hobart at Swarthmore - - - - 

May 22 — Lehigh at Bethlehem - - - - 
June 3 — University of Toronto at Swarthmore 

Totals ------ 



s. 


Opp. 





7 





I 





10 


8 


2 


4 


I 


I 


3 





12 





8 


2 


I 





6 


I 


7 



18 



58 





I'Uiai, ':;i. goal 



COLES, '21, DEFENSE 



260 




261 



rai 



le^ "* 






■I 



- .'i^«#tt^«ti®iill 



1920 Soccer 



Russell White 
Richard Darlington 



Joseph Rowley 
Peter Lowden 
Norman Stabler 
Franklin Buckman 
Russell White - 
Howard Katzenbach 



Captain 
Manager 



Robert Dunn 
Harry Sellers 



The Team 

Goal Charles Coles 

Fullback 
- Outside- 
Inside 
- Halfback - 



Coach 
Assistant Manager 



Center 

Charles Russell 

Frederic Wiese 

Herbert Mode 

William Carter 

Halfback 



For the second consecutive season the Garnet soccer team captured the championship 
of the Pennsylvania Intercollegiate Soccer League. The first three games of the year re- 
sulted in defeats for Coach Dunn's men, liut when the League contests were started the re- 
maining three games became Swarthmore victories. 

Captain White's team best demonstrated its real strength in the contests with Princeton 
and Penn. The Garnet gave the Tiger a deperate fight and the Princetonians did not grab 
victory until all but the last two minutes of play had elapsed. Swarthmore scored its only 
shut-out against its old rival. Penn. Throughout this game the Garnet was the master, scor- 
ing four goals, 

Charles Coles was high scorer for the season, having seven goals to his credit ; Wiese 
and Mode were tie for second honors with two goals apiece. Peter Lowden was elected 
captain for the 1921 season. 



Tlie results of the schedule 



George School at George School 
Syracuse at Swarthmore 
Princeton at Princeton 
Haverford at Haverford 
Penn at Swarthmore 
Lehigh at Swarthmore 

Totals 



s. 


0pp. 


1 


4 


1 


5 





1 


4 


1 


4 





3 






13 



13 



262 



^vru^t, 



f 











263 



1921 Swimming 



Captain 
Manager 



Albert L. Baxter 
Henry Chase 



The Team 



T. Sherman McAllister 
Albert L. Baxter 
Ernest M. Bliss 
Frank Jackson 
Thomas F. Bonsall 



Edwin S. Baker 
Louis Enslin 
Edgar M. Rauh 
Payne Martin 
MiLus O. Gay 



The 192 1 swimming team was seriously handicapped in its work through 
the lack of a coach. Much capable material showed up throughout the season, 
l)ut could not be developed without the guidance of a trained tutor. The 
team did not win any of its three meets, but Captain Baxter deserves men- 
tion not only for keeping up the spirit of his team mates, bi'it also for taking 
first place in the diving' contest at Johns Hopkins. A coach working with next 
year's candidates should return Swarthmore to her fomier position in tank 
circles. 



264 






\ H'. ^^ 








265 









1920 Oenuis 



TIw Team 



John W. Dudley, Captain 
Boyd T. Brown 



Harry H. Landis, Manager 
Edwin S. Baker 



Tennis last year, under the leadership of Captain John Dudley, found a new place in 
athletics at Swarthmore. With the schedule three times the size of those of previous years 
the Garnet courtmen went in for the spring sport as never before. The team won and lost 
four matches and tied one with Penn, making" a creditable showing throughout the season. 

The Johns Hopkins contest, the opening attraction of the season, proved to be a d&- 
cided victory for Swarthmore, with a 6-0 score. The following day the Navy defeated the 
Garnet at Annapolis, 7-0, but Swarthmore again hit her stride the next week and routed the 
Delaware team, fi-O. Haverford and the University of Pittsburgh were the other two teams 
which suffered defeat from Garnet racquets, while Princeton, N. Y. U. and Columbia handed 
Swarthmore the small ends of the scores. The Penn-Swarthmore series which resulted in a 
draw was one of the prettiest matches ever seen on the Wharton Courts. 

John Dudley was elected Captain of the team for 1921, this making his third term in that 
capacity. Edwin Baker was elected manager. 

Rcsulls of tlic Schedule 

April "23 — Johns Hopkins at Swarthmore - - _ - . 

April 24 — Navy at Annapolis ------ 

April 30 — Delaware at Swarthmore ------ 

May 1 — Princeton at Princeton - - - . - 

May 5 — New York University at Swarthmore - - - . 

May 10 — Penn at Swarthmore ------ 

May 12 — Columbia at New York ------ 

May 20 — Haverford at Swartlmiore _ - - - - 

May 22 — University of Pittsburgh at Swarthmore - : - 

Totals - - - - - - -.- 



s. 


Opi 


6 








7 


6 








6 





4 


2 


4 


(5 





{) 






2S 



266 




267 




Somen's ^tl)letic Association 

President - - - -- - - - - - Janet Clark 

Vice President -------- Grace Gourley 

Secretary - - -.- - - - - Henrietta Turner 

Treasurer --------- Edith Cugley 

Varsity Manager ------- Frances Miller 

Athletic Council 

Eleanor Green Elizabeth Atherholt Julia Alice Alexander 

Director of Physical Education - - - - Miss Helen Culin 
Assistant Director ----- Miss Elizabeth Lanning 



268 




WINNERS OF THE "S" 

'dinners of t^e "S" 

At the end of the Junior 3'ear, white sweaters with an Old English "S," 
are awarded as the highest honor to be won in Women's Athletics. All girls 
are eligible who have played on Varsity teams in two different sports. Mem- 
bership on two Varsity scrub teams is equal to that on one Varsity team. 
Abo^•e all, howe\-er, the winner must be a good sportsman. 




Seniors 

Elizabeth Atherholt Hannah Eavenson 

Janet Clark Helen Griscom 

Frances Miller 



Juniors 



Helen Gawthrop 
Borothy Nassau 



Elsa Palmer 
Helen Thorne 



FRANCES inU.ER. '21 



269 



"dinners of Varsity Sweaters 

Hockey 
Ethel Kaplan, Captain 



Frances Carter 
Janet Clark 
Eleanor Conrow 
Charlotte Griffen 
Anne Heafford 



Carol Krusen 
Dorothy Nassau 
Elsa Palmer 
Anna Roberts 
Henrietta Turner 



Basketball 

Marjorie Kistler, Captain 

Elizabeth Fisher Anne Heafford 

Eleanor Green Margaret Levering 

Charlotte Griffen Henrietta Turner 





ETHEL KAl'I.AX. '21 



GRACE GorRI.EY, '22 



270 




VAHSITI" HOCKEY TEAM 



Varsity Hfocke^ 



Last fall Swarthniore turned out a hockey team that came through the 
season winning five games out of six. The team met its one defeat at the 
hands of Penn Hall in a very close game. The score was tied until the latter 
part of the second half, when one of the Penn Hall girls succeeded in shoot- 
ing the ball to the goal-posts. 

All of the games were fast and well played, and the work of the forward 
line was exceptionally good. Owing to illness, the captain-elect. Grace Gour- 
ley, was unable to play in enough games to win her sweater, but under her 
leadership the prospects are bright for next year, for the team will lose only 



two memjjers by graduation. 



Ethel Kaplan, Captain. 



Scores for / 'arsify Games 



Ursinus 

Temple 

Swarthmore High 

Temple 

Penn Hall - 

Alumnae 



s. 
4 
4 
5 
3 
3 
3 



Opp. 
2 

4 
I 

I 

4 
I 



271 




HfocKe^ 





I'arsity Team 




L. W. - 


- 


Heafford 


L. I. 


- 


Roberts 


C. F. 


- 


Griffen 


R. I. 


- 


Carter 


R. W. - 


. 


Clark 


L. H. 


H. Griscom and Turner 


C. H. - 


_ 


Conrow 


R. H. 


- 


Nassau 


L. F. - 


- 


Palmer 


R. F. 


- 


Kaplan, Capt. 


G. 


Class Teams 


Krusen 


Seniors 




Juniors 


E. Atherholt I 
C. Straw N ) 


L. W. 




Hinds 


J. Young 


- L. T. - 


Weihenmaver 


Kinsley 


C. F. 


5 E. Griscom 
/ Keller 


Speakman 


- R. I. - ' 


- Gawthrop 


E. Strawn - 


R. W. 


- Thorne 


Rhoads - - - 


- L. H. - 


CUGLEY 


Paxson 


C, H. 


Falck 


Green - - - 


- R. H. - 


Gault 


F'iSHER 


L. F. 


Varian 


Taylor - - - 


- R. F. - 


- Thompson 


Coles - 


G. 


Williams 



Sophomores 








Freshmen 


Campbell 


- L. 


W. 


- 


Levering 


Gillespie 


L. 


I. 


- 


Fritts 


Arnold } 
Allen ) 


- -C. 


F. 


- 


Bancroft 


Fussell 


R. 


I. 


- 


Breuninger 


K. Hayes 


- R. 


W. 


- 


- Madden 


M. Hayes - 


L. 


H. 


- 


- Denlinger 


Pownall 


- - C. 


H. 


- 


Hermann 


Alexander - 


R. 


H. 


- 


Rogers 


E. Palmer 


- L. 


F, 


- 


- Fischer 


M. Palmer - 


R. 


F. 


- 


Olinger 


Bailey 


, 


G. 


- 


- Marion Jones 



Results of Interclass Games — 1st Place — Seniors ; 2nd 
Place — Freshmen; 3d Place — Sophomores; 4th Place — 
Jnniors. 




CAROL KRI'SEN, '24 



272 




VAHSITY BASKETBALL TEAM 



Varsity ^askelball 



The old Swarthmore spirit was in evidence during the 
1921 basketball season. To our coach, iVIiss Culin, who is 
the embodiment of good sportsmanship, we give the credit 
for the reputation we have gained in this connection. 

At a meeting of basketball experts and coaches of 
scftaols and colleges in the vicinity, two directors of teams 
on-'our schedule cited this year's Swarthmore team as the 
best example of true sportsmanship. They both said that 
whether Swarthmore won or lost, the spirit was exactly the 
same, and they feel that Swarthmore represents the highest 
ideal of what inter-collegiate sports should be. 

Marjorie Kistler, Captain. 



Scores of Varsity Gaini-'s 

Beechwood - _ _ . 

Temple - - - . . 

Y. W. C. A. Directors - - - 

Ursinus _-■..- 

Adelphi - - - - . 

Temple 

Drexel ----- 
George Washington - - - 



s. 


0pp. 


31 


34 


47 


58 


47 


5 


63 


31 


28 


24 


24 


38 


30 


9 


22 


20 




CAPTAIX KI.STI.EK. '21 



273 




Unterclass basketball 



The Sol^lwiiiorc Team 



Forward 
l~ar\vard 
Center 
Center (S) 
Gnard 

Guard 



Julia Alexander 

A NX A Roberts 

Marjorie Campbell 

Sara Bitler 

- Gertrude Malz 

\ Margaret Haves 

/ Makcaret Onderdonk 



\XII PISHER 



As usual the interclass basketball games stirred up a lot of noise, class spirit, good play- 
ing, and sore throats. The class championship was won by the Sophomores, who took the 
lead from the beginning. This year for the first time no varsity stars have been allowed to 
shine on their class teams. While this made the games a little more amateur, it gave more 
girls a chance and everyone pronounced the new scheme a good one. making for equality be- 
tween the classes. 



^^asKctball 

I'arsily 



Forward 


- 


- 


Kistler, Cafitain 


Forward 




- 


Turner 


Center 


- 


- 


Gkeen 


Center (S) 




- 


Heafford 


Guard 


- 


- 


Griffen 


Guard 


- 


- 


Fischer, Levering 




Class Teams 




Seniors 






Juniors 


Blackburn 


- 


F. - 


Weihenmaver 


Coleman 


- 


F. 


Rems, McMullen 


Rhoads - - - 


- 


C. - 


Falck 


H. Griscom 


- 


C. (s) - 


Thorn, Cugley 


Knabe - - - 


- 


G. - 


M. Satterthwaite 


KlNSLEV 


- 


G. 


Thompson 


Sophomores 






Freshmen 


Alexander 


- 


F. - 


Goetze 


Roberts 


- 


F. 


R. Young 


Campbell 


- 


C. - - 


Fischer 


Bitler - - - 


- 


C (s) - 


Philips 


Malz 


- 


G. - 


D. Evans 


M. Haves, Onderdonk 


- 


G. 


Walker, Van Etten 



Results of the Series — 1st Place — Sophomores; 2nd Place — 
Freshmen; 3rd Place — Seniors; 4th Place — Juniors. 




CHARLOTTE GRIFFEN, '22 



274 




FKESII.MA.N .MEI;T WI.NMOliS 



Jn spite of a deluge outside, the l''resli- 
man G^vm Meet came off on schedule time in 
Somerville Gymnasium, on the Vernal Equi- 
nox. Nineteen freshmen came out for floor 
\\'ork, and ten for apparatus. 

After marching around, prone falling, 
marking time, and lunging all over the place, 
the floor walkers disajipeared and the ap- 
paratus enthusiasts rushed into action. Work 
on the horizontal bars, the horse, and the 
rings pro\'ided plenty of opportunity for the 
athletes of the future to display their talents. 
Lois Walker entertained the spectators with 
her endless giggle, and Soup Krusen stood gracefully on the top of the horse 
when- others could only jump over. 

After the usual agonizing suspense, the verdict was announced, and 
Carol Krusen and Adele Weiler tied for first place, Kitty Madden won second, 
and Dorothy Denlinger, third. Blue, white and red ribbons were awarded to 
several individual stars. The sih^er cups were then awarded, and Soup and 
Carol each carried a handle of the biggest cup. 

Tlnterclass (gymnasium ^e(it 

The Greeks were men of mighty muscle. 

But Swarthmore girls could make them hustle. 

If T- R- H. had witnessed the athletic carnival held in the Somerville 
Gvm three days after the b'reshman Gym Meet, he would have re\'ised his fa- 
mous Haverford oration to the above version. 

The usual routine work was performed even better than last year, and 
was varied by many optionals, wonderful to behold. Helen Griscom's work 
on the rings was exceptionally good, and we thought once that like Elijah, she 
was going to Heaven on higii. In spite of bandaged wrists. Dot Nassau ran 
true to form, and Grif kept up the record she established freshman year. 

To complete the program, each class gave a stunt, each of which was very 
well done. The Juniors and Sophomores tied for first place, the Freshmen 
came next, and finallv the Seniors, but all of them were so good that it was 
hard to judge between them. The grand finale was a stunt by the toute en- 
semble, who formed a big wheel with Sue Beury mounted on the hub hold- 
ing a Swarthmore banner. The decisions 
were then announced, and the Sophomores 
carried off the honors, followed closely 
bv the Juniors, with the Seniors in 
third place. 

The selection of the Varsitv team was 
changed this year, being chosen from the 
apparatus teams only. The three girls hav- 
ing the highest scores in the meet, Char- 
lotte Griffen, Dorothy Nassau and ]\Iar- 
garet Byrd make up the Varsity team. 

For the second time ]\Iargaret received 
the sih'er cup for her victorious class team, 
and the howling mob then dispersed. 
275 




I 



mm^^mMm4 




i^iMig-irT-- 



" » M Jt JKJI „ 



J» -n MAM 



(Tlass (Bjmnasium Oeams 

Marching and Floor Work 
Seniors — Fisher, Elizabeth; Kistler, \\'el3er, Kinsley. 
Juniors — Griscom, Elizabeth: Palmer. Cugley, Thome. 
Sophomores — Bitler, Carter. Hayes, Margaret; Hayes. Katherine. 
Freshmen — Krusen, Madden, Walker. Fritts. 

Apparatus 
Atherholt, Elizabeth; Griscom. Helen; Knabe, Speakman, Heafford, 
Griffen, Gawthrop. Nassau, Atherholt, Roselynd ; Byrd, Beury, Fussell, 
Briegel, Weiler, Sniffen, Denlinger. 

Standing of (Tlasses 

Hockey Basketball 



F'irst Place 
Second Pace 
Third Place 
Fourth Place 



- Seniors 

Freshmen 

Sophomores 

Juniors 

Gymnasties 
First Place 
Second Place 
Third Place 
Fourth Place 



First Place 
Second Place 
Third Place 
Fourth Place 



Sophomores 
Seniors 

Sophomores 
Juniors 



Sophomores 

Juniors 

- Seniors 

Freshmen 




276 



!)\e5ult5 of tl)e limerick (Toatest 



First Prize 

There is a tall felhnv named ISrown 
Who travels through life looking- down. 
The reason for this 
Is not hard to miss : 
Her head's hut four feet from the 
ground. 

— AIarion JoNESy '24. 

Second Prize 

A good baseball player named Nick 
Could wallop that pill with a stick. 

Three men were on bases, 

But sad were their faces 
When Nick swung that stick like a hick. 
— Edwin S. Baker, '23. 

Honorable Mentions 

There was a gay club called the Glee 
Whose music was never heard free. 
It sang in the cities, 
And vamped all the pretties ; 
On the boardwalk it had cjuite a spree. 
— Hope Cox, '2^1. 




"WON'T YOD BE MY FIRST 
NATIONAL BANK" 




'THERE WAS A TALL FELLOW 
NAMED BROWN" 



There \vas a young bo}' named Frank, 
Whose mind was an absolute blank ; 
After he was willed money. 
He said, "Oh, Ruth honey, 
Won't you be my First National 
Bank?" 

— .\nna Roberts, '23. 



There once was an athlete named Pard ; 

He was big", so he always fell hard. 
In his first 3'ear he fell 
To a Marj (not INIarj Fell ). 

AVhich changed him from tackle to 



guard. 



-Anonymous*. 



"Tliis was written by a staff member. 



277 



Hfow Ol)e^ !^ark Our pa^pzvs 




DR. URDAHL 

Eenie, meeiiie, minie, mo. 

^\'hose foolish, childlike capers 
I hear you ask. \\'hy, scornful one, 

It's Urdahl marking papers. 



DUCKY 

He flings 'em down the Parrish steps, 
Our careful, hard-worked Ducky. 

If yours lands on the top-most step 
It's "A," — and gosh ! You're lucky ! 





MISS BROXK 

"J'aime. tu aimez, nous adores," 
He'll pull an "E," we'll wager. 

But stop one moment. ^Ve forgot! 
It's "A" — Monsieur's a major! 



MISS MEETEER 

I never give a "C" or "D." 
An "E!" Whoe'er supposed 

I'd give my students such a mark. 
'Twould make them indisposed. 




278 



SENORITA IRIBAS 

A very lenient marker 

Is the dainty Senorita, 
A perfect paper — 46. 

You're flunked! What cduld l.)e sweeter? 





M. RUDWIN 

"Thees wan should get a 53." 
He marks it with great care. 

You wonder wh\' you get a "B" ? 
Why, dear, you've got bobbed hair! 



Sonnet J^rom a jportugoose 



Each Sunday afternoon at two, 
I take my little books, I do. 
For, since I landed here at college, 
I've traveled on the road to knowl- 



edge. 



So down the path each week you'll 

see 
Me rushing past the cherry tree. 
For, since Fm here to learn a lot, 
I must be johnny-on-the-spot. 

But, in that place, take several looks. 
You'll learn some things not found 

in books. 
Fm very green, yet think I see 
Some things that were not meant for 

me. 

I guess it must be very nice 
To ask a boy for good advice : 
\\'ith something you don't under- 
stand, 
To have him lend a helping hand. 



But all alone I sit and sit, 
And wishing doesn't help a bit. 
Why doesn't someone ever see 
-\ lonely little girl like me? 

I watch and see the others fuss, — 
Thev ne\"er think of girls like us. 
They all obey the silence signs, 
But read a lot lietween the lines. 

Instead of talking loud they look 
So sweetly o'er the tops of books. 
Ah, Shakespeare knew a world of 

bliss 
\\'hen he wrote plays on things like 

this. 

"i\Iy dear, here comes a man, I 

think ; 
I guess I'll try a little wink." 

^ ij; ^ ^ ^ ^ 

Alas, alack, as he went by, 

He said. "A cinder in your eye?" 

Betty Rogers. 



279 



^e £piso6e of V<^ iDismisse^ XJl^aitress or 
5l)ips I3^at "pass in tl)e ^igb^ ' 



Do 3'ou remember, white-winged 

ship so fair, 
The night I met you on the crowded 

stair? 
I picked up your valise, and then 

your hair 
Just brushed my cheek ; 
Do you remember? 
You Imt a waitress in our dining 

hall. 
Divinely fair and most divinel}^ — 

small : 
Deep blue, coniiding eyes and over 

all 
A hat, but perched so jauntily; 
Do you remember? 
You, set adrift again upon the world 
After a curt dismissal for a word. 
Spoken in haste, with pretty liplet 

curled. 
To the chief cook; 
Do you remember? 
My pal and I were going to a hall 
To hear some pretty • music ; that 

was all. 
We saw 3'ou in the train, heard 

laughter fall 
As in cascade. 
'\\"e walked with you and your pal 

up the street; 
She was ungainly, tali, but you were 

sweet. 
I bore your small round arm and 

your valise. 
And saucy repartee and laughter 

gay, 



Though unlit was the street, made 

bright the way; 
Do you remember? 
At last there came the parting that 

I rue ; 
The harsh, rude trolley thundered 

into view. 
A daint}' kiss from lips of ruin' hue 
Is all I kept in memory of you. 
Do you remember? 
We silently walked towards the 

music hall. 
My pal and I ; 
And each one's mem'r}- under potent 

thrall 
Of what was by. 
We entered there, heard songs of 

love and wit. 
But, of them all, I can recall no bit. 
Because ni)' mind was sailing far 

away 
With you, white ship, on oceans 

sparkling, gay, 
^A'ith dreams now and forever 

passed away. 
I kept a program of the evening's 

song, 
I've put it by where mem'ry's phan- 
toms throng; 
And there you sleep. 
But I remember. 

Paul Sharpless. 

(*See editorial note before "Ad- 
vice to the Lovelorn" on p. 282). 



280 




281 



(Editor's Note — The following section was submitted to the 1921 Hal- 
c_von, but was returned with thanks and the following comment: 

Dear Sophoiiiorcs: 

] ha\e to return this to j-ou because the faculty adviser said it was too 
warm to get in. I hope }-ou will be able to get it past next year. Sorry. 

Val. 

As this Halcvon is a hot book altogether, we think it fits in admirably. ) 

AnVICE TO THE LoVE-LORN 

This department is filling a long realized vacancy in the Swarthmore 
curriculum. The Halcyon wishes to function as a course adviser in all atfaires- 
cle-coeur, and will be glad to adx'ise confidentially any person who finds him- 
self or herself entertaining any higher hopes than that of acquiring a sheep- 
skin. \\'e have retained ]Mr. Slocum as business manager. Unless otherwise 
specified, Miss Hexagarde will answer all inquiries publicly. 

Dear Aliss Hexagarde: 

I am a \'Oung man of good family and twenty years. j\Tother considers 
me good-looking and my line wonderful, and I'm a heavenly dancer, but I can't 
seem to find a steady- Of course, no girl could be truly worthy of me, but I 
think it would be to their ach'antage to pay more attention to me. Is it because 
I am too modest and unobtrusive? Please advise me. 

Chick N. Coles. 

Dear Cliiek: 

Your case interests me very much for I feel that many young men are in 
a similar plight. I would suggest that you concentrate on any young lady who 
is willing and able to listen to your line. If such can be found, your success is 
assured. Come again. 

Hexagarde. 

il/v Dear Miss Hexagarde: 

I am a young and unsophisticated student here. I have always done ex- 
ceptionally well in my studies, but lately something stronger than myself has 
distracted me. I cannot diagnose the peculiar disorder. At first I thought it 
was indigestion, but, upon consulting a physician, I was assured that I was a 
perfect specimen of American manhood. I enclose photo. Can it be that I 
am in love? 

Grant Benjamin. 

Dear Grant: 

Judging from your picture, I would agree with you that your trouble is 
not indigestion. We have recently received a similar query from Garner 
Anthony, and advise you to consult him. \\'ishing you all success, I am. 

Sincerely yours, 

Hexagarde. 

282 



Maihiinc: 

It is with great hesitancy that 1 address myself to you, hut I am in a 
peculiar plight.. I am an instructor here and, while I have tried t(j make my- 
self agreeable on all occasions by look and Viy gesture, my Eurojjean diplomacy 
seems to have fallen from favor. Girls have never been repulsive to me, so 
why should I not show my admiration in every glance ? 1 do not understand 
their apparent lack of interest, as the same lavendar shirt and ])urple tie that 
J now wear won me many followers in two other colleges. Shall I curl my 
hair, or wear flowers more frequently? I am willing to go to any length to 
be appreciated. 

Maximilien J. RuDVViN, Ph.D. 

Dear Ph.D.: 

First, you must alter your tactics — never stare at the girls so ; that was 
tried two years ago by Axel Tsakonas, ex-'22, with but little success. For con- 
structive criticisms, however, I would suggest that you accpiire the following 
as ecjuipment : 

1. Dr. Urdahl's eyeglasses ; 

2. Low, round tones of Dr. Bronk ; 

3. Walk of Dr. Brooks, and 

4. High spirits of Dr. Alleman. 

Yours fondly, 

Hexagarde. 

Dear Miss Hc.vagardc: 

I suppose that my matrimonial troubles are really a little out of \-our line, 
but I ha\'e been so struck with the good sense you have shown in answers to 
former cjueries that I will make bold to present my case. Did you ever hear the 
story of the knock-kneed flea and the blind spider? No? Well, there was — , 
but I guess I must save that one for Political Motives tomorrow. But to re- 
turn to business. You see, the main trouble with my wife is that she takes 
me too seriously. Most college people seem to take w^hat I say with several 
grains of salt, but one night last fall when I was rehearsing my coming speech 
on, "Feminine Suffrage Calls for a Division of Political Responsibility \Mth 
Feminine Voters," she overheard me, and took in every word. Since then, I 
have had to darn my own socks. What would you advise me to do ? 

Robert C. Brooks. 

Dear Dr. Brooks: 

As you say, your case is a little bit out of my line, but I have acted the 
parts of sophisticated married women so often that I can, at any rate, supply 
a solution from literature. You perhaps recall Mr. Barrie's play, "The Ad- 
nn'rable Crichton." But, in case you do not, I will sa)^ that it is concerned with 
an English butler, an admirable man in every way. The accident of a ship- 
wreck drops the butler and his master's family into a new set of circumstances, 
and the butler displaces his master because of his natural abilities. And so 
there is a good chance for you to assert yourself if vou move, with your fam- 
ily to some desert island, where your ca\'e-man tactics will be most effective.. 
But, in civilization, what can a poor man do? 

Faithfully, 

Hexagarde. 

283 



01)^ jpunster's 4^ age 



They say he Aydelotte before he came d(3\vn here ; but. to be Frank about 
it, we tliink tliat was liecause he beHe\-ed in preparedness, having heard rumors 
of wliat Swarthmore I'~air was Hke. 

A httle pig was weeping for its mother. \vh(j was slain ; 
A porcupine, consoling, said, "Pork, you pine in vain." 

They say College Soop is getting much poorer than it used to be, due 
to H. C. L. 

Coming in late to dinner one night, Earnshaw struck the dour-belle until 
her ears rang and' she could see little stars and Byrdies floating around before 
her. "You seem to be in an actively punsive mood tonight," said the belle, 
"but I ha\-e your name anywa3^" 

She Hoped that Cox was going to be elected. When the cruel news came, 
she was heard wailing. "Oh Harding, Harding world." 

Don't you think that Oscar would just go Wilde if he read this page, and 
saw his poor attempts so far surpassed? 

"You are cordially invited to attend an open meeting of the English Club 
Friday afternoon at 4:15 o'clock. Miss Gor'em will speak and Anne FTeifer 
will dance." 

T'was the ^'oice of the punster, I heard him declare, 
"You ha\'e all failed to laugh : I must tear out mv hair." 




284 



KRPPR 2\G-hAI\ PH\ KAPPA ^S\ 



DELTA UPSlLO^i 




?HI 3IGAAA KAPPA ?\i\ DELTA THETA 





285 



Hinox an6 Cimerix, Hue, 

Ulumorists 




There is a young junior named 

Sellers 
AMio is one of the hest of the fellers ; ' 
But just hear him laugh, 
He sounds like a calf 
As he moos and he coos and he 
hellers. 



George Jackson (at Prexy's reception) — "Really, Dr. Swain, I don't 
think I'd lietter ha\e another cake. — Well, since you insist, — 

A'Irs. Swain (aside) — "Does thee really think this is wise, Joseph? It 
happens every year, thee knows." 

Prexv — "Oh, hother the expense! Give the hird another seed." 



There was a young lady named 
Bohhy ; 

Doing Phoenix work was her hohby. 
She wrote a fine story, 
And won so much glory. 

The Editor's heart became throhby. 



There was a young chemist named 
Mears 

\A'hose lab work was far in arrears ; 
But lie "came to" one day 
And pulled through with an "A" 

Bv buying his Prof a few beers. 



There once was an Evans named 

Heinie, 
And the top of his head it was 
sheinie ; 
Not so with his back, 
\Miich was hairy and black. 
"Pm the only real man here,'' said 
Heinie. 



286 



Kapp/\ alpha theta p\ beta pmi 



KAPPA KAPPA G-AMnA 







CHI 0/^AEG-A 



PHI /v\0 









287 



At college we find old man Wiese ; 
To tell what his thoughts are is easy. 

No matter how hot 

^^'hatever he got. 
He said, "I will just have to seize E." 



Eddv Joseph is here from Ohio ; 

\\'hat an athlete he's proven, O my O. 
But his friends are all present 
When his wash hrings a pheasant. 

And they all put on weight eating 
pie-o. 



There was a young fellow called 

Snake, 
Who surely made other teams Cjuake. 
He could play basketball 
\\'ithout trembling at all ; 
But the sight of a girl made him 
shake. 



A black and white mongrel named 

Pip 
Piled into a bulldog called Zip. 
But the rest of the story 
Is tearful and gory; 
Said Spotswood, "Poor Pip, let him 
R. I. P." 



A short, peppy prof, Robert C, 
Brooks no lateness to classes, not he ; 

He stamps down his foot. 

And kills with a look 
The late entrant, whoever it be. 

A ^•ery short fellow named Bud 
Seems as cjuiet as a cow with her 
cud. 
But just get him to tell 
'Bout that breakfast in hell. 
And vou'll find him as comic as Rud. 



Lacrosse is a game that is rough ; 

But Geiges, I'll say, has the stuff. 
He gets cracked on the head 
Till you'd think he'd be dead. 

But that's not where he keeps the old 
stuff. 



All the brothers are looking to see 
The girl that I brought here with 
me; 
\\'hen we start in to glide, 
.Ml the rest stand aside; 
For she's pretty, she's true, and she's 
free. 



(Signed) 



Boots. 



28S 



I VND^feMLPY 




Or Wbr Valentine Is Still In Our Mti6st 

Now Valentine gave up the gliost in his room b)' the C-2 stair, 

And a Spirit came to his bedside and gripped him by the hair; 

A Spirit gripped him by the hair and carried him far away, 

Till he heard as the roar of Pusey's Ford the roar of the Milky Way ; 

Till he heard the roar of the Milky Way die down and drone and cease. 

And they came to the Gate within the Wall where Hastings holds the keys. 

"Stand up, stand up now, Valentine, and answer loud and high 

The goocl that ye did for the sake of men or ever ye came to die — 

The good that ye did for the sake of men in the little earth so lone." 

And the naked soul of Valentine grew white as a rain-washed bone. 

"O, I have a friend on earth," he said, "that was my priest and guide. 

And well would he answer all for me if he were by my side. 

Just call up Swarthmore College: ask for Joseph in C-2-12, 

And ask him to journey up here, if ye would in the matter delve. 

For he'll clear everything up for me, recount my brilliant past ; 

Then ye'll hear of my Phoenix and Halcyon work, and will let me in at last." 

Forsooth, it may well be, foul sprite, that ye did well on earth ; 

But now ye wait at Heaven's gate, and not in the sphere of your birth. 

Though we called your friend from his bed this night, he could not speak 

for 3^0 u. 
For this race is run by one and one, and not by two and two." 
Then Valentine looked up and down, and little gain was there. 
For the naked stars grinned overhead, and he saw that his soul was bare. 
And that none of his journalistic work would seiwe him, ill or fair. 
The good souls flocked like homing doves and bade him clear the path. 
And Hastings twirled his jangling keys in weariness and wrath. 
"Ye have wrote, ye have governed and thought," he said, "and the tale is 

yet to run ; 
By the worth of that body that once ye had, give answer — what ha' ye done?" 
Then Valentine looked back and forth, and little good it bore. 
For the Darkness stayed at his shoulder blade, and Heaven's gate before. 
"I ha' played three years on the football team, I ha' tried my hand at lacrosse; 
For the good some say lies in Y. M. C. A., I ha" given up gold and dross, 

289 



il), III,.. I ^t^ 



,BUD 



(\\'hile I miglit have jilayed poker in Section E, I worshipped and mourned 

not my loss)'." 
"O what care we," said the old turnke\-, "for that Ijauble, a varsity letter? 
It is but a trinket (an' do ye not think it?) do be proudly shown off on a 

sweater. 
And, mark what I say, this Y. M. C. A. is not worth the space it takes up; 
Your lite had been easy, if ye'd followed, like Wiese, the woman, the song, 

and the cup. 
But I've no more time to bother with ye ; 

ye hamper Heaven's gate ; 
There's little time between the stars in 

idleness to prate. 
Get hence, get hence, to the Lord of 

\Vrong, ere ye speak another line. 
And the faith that the}' give ye in Sec- 
tion C uphold ye, Valentine." 



The Spirit gripped him by the hair, and sun by sun thev 

fell 
Till they came to the belt of Naughty Stars that rim the 

mouth of Hell, 
And Rena and Reds and ^\'inzie saw he and marked lie 

well. 
Oh. the first she blinked like a thwarted Sphinx, and 

the second, green-eyed and wan. 
Danced with the third like a Dodo bird, while Lucifer 

clapped them on. 
The Wind that blows between the worlds, it nipped him 

to the bone. 
And he yearned to the flare of Hell-gate there as the 

light of his own hearthstone. 
Clancey, he sat behind the bars, where the desperate 

legions drew. 
But he caught the hasting Valentine and would not let 

him throuHi. 








K. -^Mn they /ell--- 



290 



:^f^ 




23dA 



"Wot ye the price of good pit coal that 1 nnist pay," said he, 
"That ye rank yoursel' so fit for Hell, and ask no leave o' ine? 
Old H. C. L. reigns here in Hell, and pesters me too witli glee. 
Sit down, sit down upon the slag, and answer loud and high 
The harm that ye did to the sons of men or ever ye came to die." 
And Valentine looked u]> and up, and saw against the night 
The Naughty Stars dancing a shimmy-dance, ablaze in the 1 lellish h'ght. 
"O, I had my love on earth," said he, "and she kissed me to my fall. 
And if ye would call my love to me, I know she would answer all." 
"All sin that ye sinned through love's fierce wind was not through malice done. 

Though we whistled your lo\'e from her bed this 

night, I venture she would not come. 
For the sin ye do by two and two ye pay for one by 

one" 
The Wind that blows between the worlds, it cut him 
like a knife. 
And Valentine took up the tale and spoke of his sin in life : 
And while he spoke, he saw Frank Hoke, a sizzling on a fork. 
The while he froze, in Nature's clothes, he watched that 

fire of cork ; 
And as he gazed he was so crazed and envious of his mate. 
With sharpened tongaie, both loud and long, of fictioned 

sins he spake. 
But Lucifer Clancey was dratted sly at finesse diplomatic: 
And as Val yarned and yarned and varned, and grew well 

nigh ecstatic, 
With beetled brow and slanted e}-e, he watched him through 

the bars. 
And out beyond, with gazes fond, at the three small 

Naughty Stars. 
At length he sighed as he stopped the tide of phrases with a 

motion. 
And said, "Enough, now can that stuft': it's as old as the 

oldest ocean. 
For example that Sphinx (do you see the minx?) once came 

with looks of love. 
And claimed her right to my warm firelight for her crimes 
on the earth above. 



^rocicfwo 



291 



What liad she ilone? -Why, the httle one liad scarcely learned to shimmy. 

She'd just learned her prances at Phi Sig- dances, pretentious little ninny. 

At any rate, there she sits in state, cra\ino- the heat inside, 

\\'hile Grohert, Mears, Bogardus and Hoke have enough of my heat and beside." 

"But why," beseeched poor Valentine, by this time chilled to the bone, 

Should all these four have'heat to spare, and I, poor man, have none?" 

"Well, Grobert (Lank) is forced to bank his luck on poker games; 

And when he fails, he lies on nails and red-hot picture frames 

Which once held faces of modern Graces, the New York chorus girls. 

And stood on his walnut cracker-room dresser, and set his brain in whirls. 

And old Sig" Mears, the Chemistry bear, is forced to tears of mirth 

By making bunions of Spanish onions, to pester folks on earth. 

And when he laughs, (as he always laughs, because I make him do it). 

He must take a bath (which makes me laugh) in hot synthetic suet. 

But the lot that's hardest is Jim Bogardus". He's shut in an air-tight room; 

He has to make speeches until he screeches, from now till crack o" doom. 

And the air in his room heats up red-hot, gets hotter at every word. 

Until the poor guy, with tear in his eye, calls me in plea absurd. 

And I cool it off with smile and scoff. Then again he must make himself heard 

Then there's Hoke on a fork, o'er a fire of cork, getting his heat bv touch, 

He's here for his crimes in Ital3''s climes, where they say he drank some hooch. 

— But, as for you, \\-hen you went through with Hoke and Morgan's gang. 

You said, 'Ah, no; please pass de I'eau,' so you can just go hang." 

And the Devil blew upon his nails, and the little devils ran, 

(Daller and Cugs with salad forks, and Tonv and Sharpless w'ith fans) : 

And he said, "Go, husk this whimpering thief that comes in the guise of a man. 

And hound him out 'twixt star and star, and back to the distant earth ; 

There's sore decline in Adam's line if his be human birth. 

— And, as for you, friend Valentine, e'er ye seek my gate again. 

See that ye do a sin that's a sin, and worthy of the name." 

He clapped his hands, and the servile imps began the weary chase. 

They prodded him on with their salad forks, and fanned his frozen face. 

And he tied like a black man from a ghost till he reached the edge of space. 



Now Valentine haunts the earth once more, and seeks ])y might and main 
To do a sin that is a sin, and venture to Hell again. 




5.T m 



rm 



\rm 




rm 



8"°M' 



Son^ o\ a i)i5appointe6 Uuaior 

Once upon a Thursday evening, while I pondered deeply grieving 
On the record of my work at old Swarthmore. 
Suddenly in manner shocking came a loud and heavy knocking 
For the immediate unlocking of my fast shut chamber door. 
"Tis a junior mate I muttered, knocking at mv chamber door, 

Onl)^ this and nothing' more." 
But the knocking never ceasing^, in a din of sound increasing 
Struck a note of cjuick conjecture, what this person had in store, 
For a junior who was striving and in man}- ways contriving 
To keep up relentless driving for the honors at Swarthmore. 
"But it might be some poor scholar come to borrow half a dollar. 

Maybe this and nothing more." 
So deciding on a statement that ray funds without abatement 
Passed away without returning as they often have before, 
And without more hesitation, in a truly cordial fashion. 
Seeming to denote elation, opened wide the chamber door. 

To the wind and nothing more. 
But some footsteps were approaching, and they seemed to be encroaching 
On the superstitious trend my fathers had in days of vore ; 
In a manner truly spooky, in there marched a solemn Bookie 
Aiunching on a canteen cookie, marched within my chamber door: 
And he sat upon the sofa just within my chamber door. 

Sat and ate, and nothing' more. 
Then I wondered how a student could become so much imprudent 
As to Ijring uneaten cookies from the students Wharton store, 

29: 



Lut he sat there slowly munching, in his muuth the cookies bunching, 
\Miile the noisy hollow crunching sounded loud within the door; 
Then I asked him what designing mission here he bore, 

Otioth the Bookie, "Seven more." 
?\Inch I marvelled how a senior, with such grave and stern demeanor, 
.\nd intelligence unquestioned in the countenance he W'Ore, 
Could talk such foolish chatter, could make such silly patter, 
I begged to know the matter, with this bird of secret lore. 
Begged to know just what he meant with cryptic words like "seven more,' 

Quoth the Bookie, "Seven more." 
\\'ith these words a strange excitement and a possible enlight'ment 
Caused a feeling I must sound him for his purpose to explore. 
"Tell me Bookie, on the level, tell me e'er my thoughts dishe\'el. 
E'er they drive me to the devil, e'er I roll upon the floor ! 
Tell me if my soul shall pass within that bolted door!" 

Quoth the Bookie, "Never more." 
Be that word our sign of parting man or fool! I yelled upstarting; 
Get you back into the howling mob within your mystery shore. 
Leave no crumbs here as a token of the two words you have spoken. 
Leave th' ambition you have broken, take yourself without my door. 
Move your carcass from the sofa far to Charon's Stygian shore. 

Quoth the Bookie, "Never more." 
And the Bookie never stirring w'ith no thought of me occurring, 
Still is lying on the sofa spread with cracker crumbs galore. 
And his eyelids slowly flutter and his lips still slowdy utter. 
In a drowsy sort of mutter wdiat he told me oft before: 
\Miat this cjuaint and curious Bookie said within ni}' chamber door. 

Onlv — se\"en, seven more. 




294 




SEMPEft flOELIi 

TOHNNIE 




1 1330-1101 




, 




V 



A lot more sweet nothings to tell, 
Then at half after seven — a Bell ! ! 

It makes us stop fussin' 

And starts us to cussin' ; 
We wish we could send it to see General Sherman. 



0ib you TEver "pbr 'post Office ? 

The grandest thing on earth to me 

Is just the college mail ; 
I watch each morn impatiently 

To see the college mail. 
And, if it rain or be it fair. 
You'll never fail to find me there 

Hunting the college mail. 

(For second verse substitute male for mail, and proceed as before). 

295 



THE WEAKLY BUNKUM 



The Weakly Bunkum 

Put (Uit ;it iiitc'r\uls 
of somewliere near a 
week by a staff of the 
students of Swattniore 
College. If j-ou are a 
mail subscriber, you pay 
slightly more, and are 
guaranteed to receive at 
least one copy every 
month. 

Woant U. B. My Val. 
Ed-in-chief. 

J. Furnace Bogardus, 
Busy-Mgr. 

Eich. W. Cumsloly, I- 
will-be-ed-in-chief. 



STATFMENT BY 
BUSY MANAGER 



EDITORIAL 



A¥e have been muchly 
bothered of late in onr 
attempts to get adver- 
tisements. Mr. Brosiuni, 
my subordinate, claims 
that he did enough work 
in pulling down his pres- 
ent job, and that he in- 
tends spending all spare 
time from now on with 
the infernal game of 
bridge. 

Over and above, how- 
e V e r, nevertheless, the 
aforesaid, another b i g 
botlier weiglis me down. 
Which is that the adver- 
tisers refuse to advertise 
because they claim their 
financial condition be- 
comes worse by the cost 
of the advertisement 
when they advertise. 
And what is much more 
worse, they can prove it. 
They say Look at Celia, 
dago shoerepairman. 
He has no ad, and yet is 
much more flowering in 
business than we are. 
And there you are. How^- 
ever, I have come to one 
w r k i n g conclusion. 
Namely, life is just one 
deninition h a r d grind, 
and curse prohibition the 
lack of which made me 
forget m.y woes during 
the first year of mj' in- 
cumbency (1918-1919). 



Hey, fellows, I think 
we ought to imj)rove the 
spirit around this joint. 
I'm the editor. Where 
did I get my own spirit, 
you ask? Why, I got it 
over in Europe last sum- 
mer, when I was bum- 
ming around with Hoke 
and Morgan. You see, 
they don't have prohibi- 
tion over there. I'll tell 
you the way I got start- 
ed on this proposition. 
One day we'd been walk- 
ing all day, and we were 
pretty hungry and down 
ill the mouth. Kemp, (I 
forgot to mention him 
before), spoke up and 
said, "Hey, fellows, I 
know what's wrong with 
us: it's our spirit. I 
think we ought to im- 
prove it." Well, we hap- 
pened to be passing one 
of them cafes that they 
have every h u n d r e d 
yards along the side of 
the road, so we dropped 
in and improved our 
spirit Avith some o-be- 
joyful, and that made us 
feel lino. 

That whole occurrence 
set me a thinking to beat 
the cars, and I says to 
myself, says I, "Why not 
improve S'liiore spirit in 
the same way? Serve it 
with all meals, and then 
when we have a game or 
a mass-meeting every- 
body'd be in good spirits, 
and we'd make out fine." 
Well, fellows, I don't 
know how it was, but I'll 
clean forgot about pro- 
hibition over here, and 
so it don't seem to work 
out very well. I've been 
to see Miss Briarly about 
it, but she says she can't 
do it on her present din- 
ing room appropriation. 
Well, that being the 
ease, I guess we'll have 
to be content with milk- 
shake and college milk 
for a while. But lets do 
the best we can for 
Aluier Mater in spite of 
these limitations. 



LATEST BULLETIN 



Deep Mystery Finally 
Solved 

It is well known that 
there has long been a 
cloud of mystery sur- 
rounding Mrs. Newport's 
very remarkable ability 
as a talker (from the 
viewpoint of amount of 
time consumed). After 
tedious efforts and a 
long investigation. The 
Bunkum has finally ar- 
rived at a solution, and 
discovered the source of 
her great power. The in- 
formant is Dr. Newport's 
mother. 

"At the age of two 
years," writes this ven- 
erable lady, "my daugh- 
ter was still unable to 
make more than inarticu- 
late s o u 11 d s. As she 
should, at that time, have 
been able to talk for 
many months, I was so 
concerned that I consult- 
ed the family doctor on 
the matter. On exami- 
nation. Dr. pro- 
nounced my daughter 
tongue-tied, and advised 
the very simple opera- 
tion of c u 1 1 i n g her 
tongue loose. In spite of 
my protests (for I fore- 
saw the result) my 
daughter's tongue w a s 
cut. The worst thing 
about the matter was 
that the doctor's knife 
slipped, and he cut more 
than he intended to. The 
tongue began to wag im- 
mediately and has been 
going ever since." 




COLLEGE NEWS 



Football Games, De- 
bates, Student Govern- 
ment, College Spirit, 
Goat Feathers, Mass 
Meetings, Etc. 

Same Old Weary Grind 

As the aliove items are 
merely repetitions of 
what has been going on 
annually ever since the 
founding of the college, 
onr readers may easily 
fill in the details from 
memory; if memory fails 
them, they may look in 
Bunkums of past years. 
At any rate we will try 
to swat old H. C. L. by a 
slight saving of paper. 
The football team 
played a wonderful 
game if it Avon, and Avas 
in hard luck if it lost. 
Every dance, mass meet- 
ing. Founders' Day pro- 
g r a m, and Comnieiice- 
meiit Avas better than 
the preceding one. The 
miserable and ground- 
less optimism of the re- 
porter, to Av h m the 
present looms greater 
than all history, is the 
groundAvork of our press 
system. We say 'with 
'Thoreau, "All that is 
called news is gossip, 
and they A\'ho edit it and 
read it are old Avomeu 
over their tea.'' 



M,\DAJIE .SNEWPORT 




APRIL, 1920 

Sat. 10 — Somerville Day — M e n 
admit that the female of the species 
is more deadly than the male, and 
embark for parts unknown and 
Chester. 

Thurs. 15 — Dr. Goddard delivers 
an alarming talk in Collection at 
which we uneasily watch the clock. 

Fri. 16 — Miscellaneous freshmen 
Cakewalk through the dining room. 
Extemp contest and Carolien White 
wins first prize by presenting herself 
as the best argument for co-educa- 
tion. 

Tues. 20 — Two waitresses try to 
elope, but jealous Parrishioners in- 
tervene. Herrick and Hicks missing 
from Collection the next morning, 
but of course there's nothing in cir- 
cumstantial evidence. 

Fri. 23 — Hahn Quartet perform on 
the platform, assisted by Bobby 



Roberts and Bill Cisney in the Gal- 
lery. ' 4i 



{s 






Sun. 25 — Joint meeting of Men's 
and Women's Student Government 
in the front parlor — Helen and Erd 
remain to see that fussing rules are 
obeyed. 

Mon. 26 — Book and Key headed 
by Brethren Bush and ^Vilson beg a 
crust at Junior Cottage. 

Tues. 27 — Heavy thumping in 
girl's g3'm leads us to suspect that 
May Day is impending. 

Fri. 30 — Freshman Show. Cur- 
tain. 



297 



MAY 

Sat. 1 — "l\)-day's 
Ma)-," so it rained. 




n Ji 



the first of 



Tues. 4 — Dan- 
ish Axel supplant- 
ed by a single 
Pole about which 
the women stu- 
dents dance and 
trip (mostly trip). 
Jean Knowles and 
Pollard's dog do 
a solo. 

Thurs. 6 — Tap 
night. Gawthrop 
and White sus-. 
pend themselves 
from roof to 
watch the pro- 
ceedings. 

Sat. 8 — Carolien White \\iii> a 
dollar from Bill Ware by eating a 
worm. Likes them just as well as 
oysters, only they are awfully tick- 
lish. 

Sat. 15 — Dolly Oliver and her pet 
hound inform us in collection that 
"it's not far from London." 

Sun. 16 — Phoeni.x picnic. The 
dogs are so big that Miss Lukens 
innocently eats one, thinking it a 
bologna. 

Tues. 18 — The Sophomores picnic 
with the Seniors at Ye Sign of Ye 
Pig-pen. Rough-house and butter 
on the rolls. 

Wed. 19— Ruth W^atters and 
Charlie Ritchie, biology enthusiasts, 
leap into the Cruni to study fishes. 

Fri. 21 — Halcyons arrive. Riot 
in P. O. 

Sat. 22— Jack Dudley— "No, I 
can't play tennis with you now. I 
have to go over to the infirmary and 
eat lunch." 

Sun. 23 — Thetas have a gay party. 
Betty Burris is laid up for three 
days with a doctor and two nurses. 
Slocum walks to A^^^arton with the 
fellows. 



Mon. 24 — Bill Kemp breaks Col- 
lege record in broad jump. Ed. 
Smith awarded the distinction of 
being the "fastest man in college." 
He wins the two-mile race in the 
Rutgers' meet. 

Tues. 25 — The Faculty grin fiend- 
ishl}" as we meet them in the halls. 
We don't have to have automobiles 
to know what the blue book is. 

Wed. 26— J. R. H. tells how they 
used to sen'e cocoa and crackers be- 
tween exams. 

Sat. 29 — The Phoenix informs us 
that "Spring is here ; we feel it in 
the air and taste it in the milk." 




Tues. 1- 



JUNE 

-Full moon- 



-nufJ sed. 



Thurs. 3 — College dance ; mid- 
night oil supplanted by gasoline. 




Fri. 4 C1U.S.S Day. Waldo gets 
through his speech without break- 
ing down. Cornie and Cliff look 
radiant during the Avedding march, 
but nothing doing as yet. Minch 
and Betty Jones look down the long 
vista of life together. They say it 
looks something like this. 

Sat. 5 — Home. 



298 




£nfln- 

TLes Vacances 

Ifow >il?e. Spanb It 



A few of us, like Pugh, 
respond to the Call of 
the Wild, in one form or 
another. 




And some, frinstance Gillie and 
Mar}', become instructors in the 
great traveling university, of which 
Paul M. Pearson is president and 
F. Leslie Nofer court comedian. 
These two instructors are em- 
ployed as devil-tamers. Two of 
their charges may be seen in the 
background. 





The Katcha Stig Club, consisting of million- 
aires with nothing better to do, repairs to the sea- 
shore to play in the sand and observe the clouds. 
Observe the naive and kittenish manner in which 
Clark is displaying his new Kwink key. 



299 



And a goodly number go 
down to the sea with the idea 
of taking a swim. Our first 
illustration shows Miss Heaf- 
ford. She's happy because she's 
having her picture taken, and 
because she is looking beyond 
the camera at the austere and 
manly beauty of Mr. Collisson. 




Yes, this picture nnist have been taken by a member of 
the fair sex. Lank Grobert is close at hand, however. He 
is seen in the lower background, trying to get up his nerve 
to disregard the "Verboten" sign. 





This is a type to be very much feared by all except ex- 
tremely young members of the hard sex. She is one of those 
vicious creatures known as "seashore vamps," or "beach comb- 
ers." Notice the sly look in her eyes. 



Our next is a "from life" photo of the much 
feared killer-whale. One twitch of his tail (the tip 
of which projects from the water), and the camera 
man, blinded by a stream of water, would have been 
drawn under to his certain doom. But, at the crucial 
moment, a fair diver in a one-piece suit appeared at 
the next dock, and the photographer was saved. 





This is Griff. The knotted and gnarled muscles visible in 
her upper arm were acquired climbing around the top of the 
men's gym, decorating for the soph dance last year. 



300 



This picture illustrates Miss Gaw- 
throp working in her father's office 
for pin money, during spring vaca- 
tion. The water is too cold to get 
into as yet, and she's waiting for it 
to warm up. 




i-<:*EM^ 




The title of this masterpiece is "The Vacant 
Chair." It might be "The Vacant Cushion" or 
"The Vacant Look," but the first title sounds so 
much nicer and more romantic, you know. But 
Betty should put it down to Wid's credit that 
there's no one else there, anyway. 



We have placed this last in the series because it 
is the masterpiece, being the only known photograph 
of a Swarthmore student engaged in real work, and 
the only one of the gentleman on the reader's right 
engaged in any sort of labor. A fitting verse descrip- 
tive of this lovely pastoral scene is this from Gray: 

"p-ar from the madding crowd's ignoble strife, 
Their sober wishes never learned to stray.'' 




301 



BACK TO WORK AGAIN 




SEPTEMBER 

Mon. 20 — Football squad reports, 
incidentally we return to College. 
^Velcome, freshmen ! Here's one we 
caught from the West. He is the 
pied piper — or would have been if 
we had had any pies handy. 





"WIEGIE AND CORNIE WATCH THE 
POSTER-FIGHT" 

Wed. 22 — Elsa Palmer plays "be- 
a-fireman" and referees Fresh Feed. 
iNIarj. Fell becomes a li\ing skele- 
ton. 

Sat. 25— Y. \\'. and Y. M. recep- 
tions. Hot dogs ! Y. ^^^ specializes 
in moon-light dances. 

Mon. 27 — Sheppard talks on 
"Swarthmore As Seen From a Fire 
Enafine." 




Tues. 21 — Registration day. 
Brooksie's courses popular among 
the women, second only to Domestic 
Science for Seniors. Cornie Coy's 
minstrels display much talent and 
stockings. (No males allowed). 



Tues. 28— Tubby Nicholls still 
hides behind a moustache. 

Thurs. 30 — Peggys (Hayes and 
Herman) bob their hair. Wiegie 
Firmin and Marty are dis-tressed 
also. 



OCTOBER 

Fri. 1 — Tul)by bobs his moustache 
as he says it tickled his chin. 



Fri. 15 — Above is the way it Ifjokcd 
in the morning; below, liow they 
looked in the afternoon. 




Sat. 2 — Kate and her Bevy of 
Twenty Beautiful Bums hoof it for 
Princeton. The Tiger beats us 17-6. 

Sun. 3— Bunny McCall and Mr. 
Rudwin walk the R. R. tracks. 
"Bum" time. 

Tues. 5 — Doc. yVlleman speaks in 
Collection. 

Fri. 8 — Day Students Night in 
dining room. Hildegarde shows 
why day students should tolerate 
us. Big mass meeting. 

Sat. 9 — Junior-Fresh reception so 
good that even Miss R. endures it. 
So did the Seniors, who liked our re- 
freshments particularly. 

Sun. 10 — Mr. Rudwin tells Fran- 
ces Runk that he specializes in 
Freshman and Sophomore girls. 
Too bad, Frances, you're a year too 
late. 

Thurs. 14 — Posey Atherholt sews 
a button on Lew Ayars' vest in Col- 
lection. 





Sat. 16 — Football game with Stev- 
ens — got beat, 14-7. 

Sun. 17 — Betty Atherholt joins 
the sewing circle and darns A\'alt 
Dickinson's socks. 

Mon. 18 — College picture taken. 
Cock fight between \\"eidler and 
Ken. Walter. 




Thurs. 21 — Miss Lukens catches 
the Fd. playing cards in Mr. Hicks' 
hangout, and lets him ofif with the 
reminder that there must be no card 
playing east of the fire plug, and 
three days suspension. When he 
heard this he was "beside himself." 



303 



Sat. 23— Beat Johns Hopkins, 41-0. 
Garner Anthony takes four girls 
and a Ford to Baltimore. 

Sun. 2-1 — Phi Psis hcild annual pic- 
nic. We are surprised at conduct of 
the model and lord-president of the 
club. 




Mon. 25 — Mass meeting- — Boyd 
looks fierce and yells, "Now, don't 
let them see one of you not there." 

Tues. 26 — Much class songs. 
Below is the way the best class 
looked. 




Sat. 30 — Founders' Day. 




NOVEMBER 

Tues. 2 — Election Day. "This 
suspense is awful." 

\\ ed. 3 — Democrats sarcastically 
predict Jjetter meals now that Hard- 



ing is elected. Much paying of elec- 
tion bets. Brooksie makes his fa- 
mous speech about Jesus Christ and 
the Democrats. 

Fri. 5 — Jerry and Terry Inc. sere- 
nade Parrish. "Music hath charms" 
so the Dean didn't object. 

Sat. 6— Beat Columbia, 21-7. 
Everybody in New York except 
Dean Richards. 

Sun. 7 — Don Morgan goes to 
meeting, but Prexy didn't invite him 
to dinner. Poor Don, another chance 
gone. 

Mon. 8 — Democrats at Lorna 
Christie's table give Republicans a 
party. Johnnie Smith loses his bet 
that a girl can't eat a quart of ice 
cream. 

Thurs. 11 — Armistice Day. Aluch 
reminiscing. Helen Knight and 
Ginger Coleman ring the twilight 
bell. Don Morgan's table divorced. 

Fri. 12 — Fresh-Soph debate. 
Sophs win. 




Sat. 13— A\'alloped Del., 62 to 0. 
Junior Dance. Eddie Joe and his 
partner occupy one chair while talk- 
ing to the chaperones. 

Mon. 15 — Free ice cream at \'ic's. 

Tues. 16 — Exams still going 
strong. 

\\'ed. 17 — Returns ])egin to roll 
in. Less said the better. 



304 



Fri. 19 — Hamburg show. Kitty 
Hayes "gazes and gazes." Mr. Rud- 
win says it with flowers to Winzie. 

Sat. 20— Beat Haverford, 28-7. Big 
mass meeting with dance after- 
wards. Pard in agony until his turn 
is over. 

Sun. 21 — The morning afterwards. 

Wed. 24 — Vacation. The trains 
left at 12:02 and 4:04. NuiT sed. 




Mon. 29 — Back again. Wiese, 
White and Stow, and others in the 
same boat, busy carrying suit cases. 




DECEMBER 

Thurs. 2 — Dave Dennison misses 
breakfast fur the second time in 
three years. 

Mon. 6 — Educational week. We 
are informed that teachers get good 
salaries. 

Tues. 7 — Our error. The speaker 

today says they don't. 

Wed. 8 — More education. We are 
to be the young men and women of 
tomorrow. 

Sat. 11 — Much singing in Collec- 
tion. Humphreys refuses to get in- 
to the fight. 




Tues. 30— Marks out. 



Mon. 13 — Ten freshmen eat off 
mantel in parlor. Some whanging! 
! * *_ // & *. 

Tues. 1-4 — Tagore recital. Ducky 
and Rabindranath appear in evening 
dress. Ducky looks nice but Rabin- 
dranath looks comfortable. 

AA^ed. 15 — AViese imitates the bath 
robed hero and goes around chant- 
ing, "O, fresh-fish — O-Caloflower — 
O-Allah — O-succethosh — O-gosh ! 

Thurs. 16 — Christmas table par- 
ties. Someone lost his head and 
threw it around the dining-room. 
Result — Cold slaw and a hot time. 



30„ 



Christmas dance. The outsiders let 
us have the corners to dance in. 

Fri. 17 — Over at last. Everyone 
sees Bud off except the engineer. 
Heinie stays to study and goes to 
Chester. 

Sat. 18 — Henie goes to Clifton. 

Sun. 19 — Heinie goes to Darby. 

Alon. 20 — Heinie gives up and 
gfoes home. 



Thurs. 6 — Mrs. Barrett in the post 
office, but we don't care — we'd rath- 
er have an older woman read our 
postals. 

Fri. 7 — Big extra — just out! ! 
Freshmopolitan of 1924 — Stars from 
cover to cover — I.^ena the big head- 
liner. 

Sat. 8 — Bill Huey tries to get in 
the Pi Phi picture, but Grace recog- 
nizes her coat in time. 



JANUARY 

Mon. 3 — Fur coats and kisses pre- 
dominate in the hall. Pret and Russ 
Heath stick around. 

Tues. 4 — Happy, fat, but doggone 
sleepy. 




^^'ed. 5 — Skating on the Crum. 





Mon. 10 — Some more snow. Betty 
Rogers oft'ers a chocolate eclair to 
the first man to land a snowball on 
her bunkie's bed. 

Tues. 1 1 — Swarthmore million- 
aires come across with money to 
send eggs back to Germany's starv- 
ing children. 

Wed. 12 — Rudwin thrust upon us 
in Collection. ^Ye recommend him 
for toastmaster at annual Devil's 
banquet. 

Sat. 15 — College dance after the 
Bucknell game. Much competition 
in bobbed hair from BeechAvood. 

Sun. 16 — The eff'ect of Rudwin's 
speech in Collection was seen in 
meeting. Even Curley was moved. 



306 




J\luii. 17 — F.xams posted. 

Tues. 18 — Joe goes in to i)ick out 
a car for graduation present. What 
kind did you pick, Joe, a \\'hite? 

Wed. 19 — Benny goes in to pick 
out a necktie for graduation present. 

Thurs. 20 — Mr. Turner gives a 
lecture on the evolution of our 
brains, entitled "Concrete Construc- 
tion." 

Fri. 21 — Score of girls' game, 47-5. 
Looks more like five hundred than 
basketball. 

Sat. 22 — Skating season open.s. 
Boyd Brown takes his weekly bath 
in the Crum. 




Sun. 23 — Glee Club in Atlantic 
City. Shaw and Grobert reprimand- 
ed by a blue-coat on boardwalk for 
blocking traffic with their stogies. 

Mon. 2A — Janet and Doc ]\Iiller 
sing duet in Collection — "Lead me 
lest I go astray." 




Tues. 25 — A week before exams, 
and preparedness is all the rage. 




A\'ed. 26 — Much weeping and 
wailing and wearing of crepe. Big 
chief Hump he leave Wigwam 
^\'harton to chase big game in the 
north. 

Thurs. 27 — College song birds 
hold forth at the W^omen's Club. 
Chick falls off his chair and queers 
the Rosary. 

Fri. 28 — Interp. plays. Profound 
audience stirred by thrills of blether 
Goose. 




Sat. 29 — Wiese and Coles caught 
studying in the library. 



307 



# 



AsC^?'' 




IMon. 31 — Bad (imen. Exam, week 
starts off with a bang as Shrackie 
.•■■ma?hes through grandstand in the 
gym. 




FEBRUARY 

Exam. Week 
Tues. 8 — Exams, over. 

Thurs. 10 — Classes on again. 
Books chucked until mid-semesters. 

Mon. 1-1 — Cupid had to find a man 
To swing his awful line, 
He found the l^est one 

of them all 
And called him Valen- 
tine. 

Tues. 15 — Dr. McClung gives an 
illustrated lecture on chickens. 
What's the matter with him? Does 
lie think we need it? 

Sat. 19 — Jerry plays in Collection. 
Keep your eyes on your banjo, 
Jerry, and stop vamping the faculty. 





Sun. 20 — Big snow storm starts 
coasting again. Conservative ( ?) 
D. U. Seniors get their eyes knocked 
out when girls don riding Ijreeches 
to play in the snow. 




M(in. 21 — Haverford concert. 

Tues. 22 — Facult}' moved by pa- 
triotism and call oft' classes. God 
l)less George and his little cherry 
tree. 

^^'ed. 23 — A youth most fantasti- 
cally dressed 

Broke up our \\'ednes- 
day night fest : 

"Write a lim-rick to- 
day 

W"e don't mind wliat 
}'OU say 

The staff gives a prize 
for the best." 



Thurs. 2- 
I. C. S. A. 



^1/^-A//^^. 



-Large open meeting of 



Fri. 23 — Petruchio tames Kate the 
Shrew on the stage. Hicks tames 
Kate the Californian on the balcony. 



308 



Sat. 26 — Greatest social exeiit of 
the year — Junior Dance. Novelty 
consists of fussers changing ])art- 
ners. 

Sun. 27— Benny seeks political 
patronage from Student Govern- 
ment. Takes Helen to the inn in 
spite of the rain. 

MARCH 

Tues. 1 — Bud talks in Collection. 
Tells of big times he had with Pop 
Pershing. \\'here do you get that 
line, Bud? 

\\'ed. 2 — Penn game, but where 
are Dot and Staunie? What's the 
matter — four dollars helps a lot to- 
ward the little nest-egg. 

Thurs. 3 — Faculty-Senior basket- 
ball game. Doc Mercer's B. V. D.'s 
lure victory for the profs. 




Fri. 4 — First signs of the mil- 
lenium. No fish for dinner, but they 
appear later all dressed up in the 
Glee Club Concert. 

Sat. 5 — College Dance. Miss 
Lukens revolts as chaperon. What's 
the matter, Caroline, do you want 
to toddle? 

Sun. 6 — Holy Roller tries to sell 
Bibles in Y. W. meeting. 

Mon. 7 — No, this is not May Day. 
It's the Joseph Jazz Hounds captur- 
ing the international basketball 
title. 




Tues. 8 — Brooksie tells how mar- 
riage rate was decreased when elec- 
tric lights were put on the campus 
at University . of Indiana. How 
about cutting them out here at com- 
mencement this year? 

Wed. 9 — Gang turns out to art 
exhibit. What a blow to Aline 
Woodrow when she finds out her fa- 
vorite Rembrandt was painted by 
Bud Fisher. 

Thurs. 10 — Brooksie takes his 
class in to see Grobert naturalized. 




Fri. 11 — Urdahl takes his flock to 
make reservations for the summer 
at Elwin. Runkie seems to be ready 
to e;o now. 



:!09 



Sat. 12 — Once more the garnet 
five knock the H out of Haverford. 

Sun. 13 — Spring is coming. E. 
Evans takes her first cooking lesson 
from Dot Young Ogden. 

j\lon. 14 — Pi Phis all lit up. Home 
brew? No, just a new lamp. 

Tues. 15 — Junior athletes shine as 
usual in gym tryouts. Both of them 
were there. 




A^'ed. lo — S\\arthmore rivals 
Palm Beach. Golf the rage on 
campus. 




Thurs. 17 — Interp class turns to 
farce. Jane Shibe stars in "Parlor 
Bedroom and Bath." 

Fri. 18 — Sig's snoring in the back 
of Collection busts up the delsate. 
That's why G. W. U. beat us. 

Sun. 20 — Swimming season opens 
— Eddie jumps in Crum. Easter 
parade begin,s — Eddie comes home 
with his B. V. D.'s on a stick. 

Mon. 21 — Freshmen gym meet. 
Campbell's soup is good for kids 
It makes them big and strong 
Ask Krusen for she's sure to say 
It made her beat the throng. 

Tues. 22 — New piano arrives, but 
still under lock and key. May1:ie we 
can use it in 1945. 

Wed. 23 — Janet, ]\Iarge and Helen 
look for four-leaf clovers on the 
campus. A\'hat in the world can 
thev want? 




Thurs. 



-Interclass gvm meet. 



Fri. 25 — Spring vacation — Nuff 
said. 



310 




311 




p. M. Sharpies, founder and presi- 
dent of The Sharpies Separator Com- 
pany, was the first separator manu- 
facturer in America and his inven- 
tions have meant millions of dollars 
to dairy people in all parts of the 
world. 



P. M. SHARPLES 
Founder and President 



The Sharpies factories at West Chester, Pa., are the oldest and 
largest separator factories in America. Sharpies machines are truly 
the world's supreme dairy machines and are in use in every country 
in the world. 



The Sharpies Separator Company 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 




Sharpies Factories, West Chester, Pa. 

312 



Tlie data you want at your liuf^ci' tips — 
From business and boilers to concrete ships; 

A storehouse of knowledge in loose-leaf style 
To put in your pocket or keep in a file. 

—That's LEFAX. 



An ordinary notebook, is kept carelessly and, when filled, is good 
for nothing. This notebook is loose-leaf and of convenient pocket size. 
At the present time, there are printed over 150 forms of filler and 5,000 
data sheets to fit it. 

LEFAX keeps your notes neat and compact. 

The printed data sheets combine with your own material in one 
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data sheets issued monthly. 



Everybody uses LEFAX. 



Beginning Next Week 

"Because of Helen" 

Mr. Benjamin returns to the 
limelight after a brief period 
of retirement. In the revival 
of this always popular produc- 
tion, Mr. Benjamin interprets 
his role with a thrill and en- 
thusiasm rarely surpassed. 



Around the Map 

George Burnett 

The NOTED STAR 

Come See What George Saw 



LIBERTY 



opening 

WEDNESDAY 



With 

ZUCKER 

— IN — 

"The Unspeakable Genius" 

A Screaming Comedy 

"Eyes of Youth" 

With 

HELEN COLLINS 



Three Times a Week— 7-10 P. M. 
at the Library 



SVi 



Havetnc\H-r Round Bar 



Havemeyer 
Reinforcing Bars 



'Every Pound Pulls" 



The Havemeyer Bar is recognized to-day by leading engineers, 
architects and contractors as the standard type of reinforcement, and 
its extensive use in every type of structure speaks well for its merits. 

Havemeyer Bars are designed to meet the necessary requirements 
of a mechanical bond in concrete, and at the same time, maintain a 
uniform area of cross-section equal to that of a plain bar. In the case 
of the square bar this constant cross sectional area is obtained by alter- 
nating plain square sections with irregular sections produced by de- 
pressing two opposite corners of the bar and raising an equal amount of 
metal on its four faces. There are no depressions on the round bar, 
but the projections or lugs on adjacent faces are staggered. 

On account of the fact that Havemeyer Bars have a much greater 
bond strength than plain bars, a concrete structure built with them will 
have a much higher ultimate strength, and a higher factor of safety, 
than if plain bars are used. 

Catalog and Booklets on Request 

Concrete Steel Company 

42 Broadway, New York 



Philadelphia 
Kansas City 
Cincinnati 
Pittsburgh 
Washington 



Birmiugbam 
Baltimore 
Cleveland 
St. Louis 



Syracuse 
Hartford 
Detroit 
Norfolk 



St. Paul 

Chicago 

Denver 

Boston 

Omaha 




Jlavcincycr Square Bar 



314 




"The Class" 

of Floor Covering Excellence 

Bundhar Wilton Durable 
as Iron, Rugs and Carpets 

HARDWICK & MAGEE COMPANY 

1220-1222 Market Street, PHILADELPHIA 
Harry W. Lang, Class of 1921, Representative 



STACY G. GLAUSER & SON 

Dealers in 

Rough and Dressed LUMBER 

Mill Work and Building 

Material 

CHESTER, PA. 



Young America 

Aid tlie boys and girls to build tlieiv 
futures. 

Money in the bank means preparedness 
for opportunities, and "Young America" 
must be ready in education, commerce, 
industry, science, art, statesmanship, to 
help Uncle Sam to lead the way. 

Start them with savings accounts 
NOW, and show them how to increase 
these funds by systematic deposits. Five 
dollars will open an account HEEE. 

We welcome the accounts of young 
people and pay three per cent, interest 
on such savings. When one hundred 
dollars is accumulated, it can be placed 
in one of our Trust Certificates upon 
which we pay four per cent, interest. 



DECEMBEK 31. 1920 

ASSETS 

Cash on Haud 5 459,272.84 

Cash in Banks 2,195,638.70 

U. S. Bonds and Certificates 582,029.13 

Demand Collateral Loans 1,71(1,410.111 

Time Collateral Loans 645,(10(1.30 

Cnnimercial Paper and Acceptances 4,581. 1(J7. 10 

Loans on Bonds and Mortgages 59(l.(lu*((.00 

.Stocks and Bonds (iSS.l.Sil.lil 

llortsages (I7.",23:i.liil 

Real Estate. Furnitnre and Kixtures 353.(172.74 

(Mher Keal Estate 19. .".(Id. (id 

Miscellaneons Assets 15.520.8(1 

$12,525,146.76 
LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock $ 750,000.00 

Surplus 700,000.00 

fiiclh-idcil Profits 64,025.71 

li,.s..iv(. l(.i- Depreciation 10,000.00 

lilOl'llMriS 10.934.2.88.58 

Dividends Unpaid 108.75 

Accrued Interest Pa.vable (ll,12ii.ill 

Miscellaneous Liabilities 4.994.11 

$12,525,146.76 
Trust Funds $ 3,543,162.31 



CENTRAL TRUST AND SAVINGS CO. 



Market and Fourth Streets 



PHILADELPHIA 



Capital and Surplus. .. .$1,500,000.00 



T. Comly Hunter, President. 
Clement J. Craft, Vice President. 
George H. MeXeely, Vice President. 
Theodore F. Miller, Vice President. 
Fredeiitk G. Helmbold, Treasurer. 



Charles K. Lnkens, Secretary. 

Anson B. Evans. Title and Trust Officer. 

George J. Hanhauser, Assistant Title and Trust 

Oflicer. 
Lewis Van Court, Assistant Treasurer. 



315 



We Want Moderate Accounts 

No one need hesitate to open an account here 
because his balance will be small at first. If 
you are considering opening a bank account, 
we shall be glad to have you call on us. 



COMMERCIAL TRUST COMPANY 

City Hall Square 



Member Federal Reserve System 



We Solicit Commercial Accounts 



Buy 

BORDEN'S 

ALMOND 
BARS 



If you want Quality 



Thatcher Spinning 
Company 

Fine Cotton 
Yarns 



n 



H. S. THATCHER, 1905 
Sec'y-Treas. 



CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 



310 



The Media 
Pharmacies 

Modern and Complete 
Drug Stores 

State and Olive Streets, Media, Pa. 
52nd and Market Streets 
60th and Market Streets 
69th and Market Streets 

60th and Market Streets 
(Store open all night) 



Auto Delivery Service 
Anytime, Anywhere 




Ketterlinus Lithographic Mfg. Co. 

Philadelphia, Penna. 



;!17 




What Is Research? 



SUPPOSE that a stove burns too much coal for 
the amount of heat that it radiates. The 
manufacturer hires a man familiar with the 
principles of combustion and heat radiation to make 
experiments which will indicate desirable changes in 
design. The stove selected as the most efficient is 
the result of research. 

Suppose that you want to make a ruby in a factory 
— not a mere imitation, but a real ruby, indistinguish- 
able by any chemical or physical test from the natural 
stone. You begin by analyzing rubies chemically and 
physically. Then you try to make rubies just as 
nature did, with the same chemicals and under similar 
conditions. Your rubies are the result of research — 
research of a different type from that required to 
improve the stove. 

Suppose, as you melted up your chemicals to pro- 
duce rubies and experimented with high temperatures, 
you began to wonder how hot the earth must have 
been millions of years ago when rubies were first 
crystallized, and what were the forces at play that made 
this planet what it is. You begin an investigation that 
leads you far from rubies and causes you to formulate 
theories to explain how the earth, and, for that matter, 
how the whole solar system was created. That would 
be research of a still different type — pioneering into 
the unknown to satisfy an insatiable curiosity. 

Research of all three types is conducted in the Laboratoriesof the 
General Electric Company. But it is the third type of research — 
pioneering into the unknown — that means most, in the long run, 
even though it is undertaken with no practical benefit in view. 

At the present time, for example, the Research Laboratories of 
the General Electric Company are exploring matter with X-rays 
in order to discover not only how the atoms in different sub- 
stances are arranged but how the atoms themselves are built up. 
The more you know about a substance, the more you can do with 
it. Some day this X-ray work will enable scientists to answer 
more definitely than they can now the question: Why is iron 
magnetic? And then the electrical industry will take a great step 
forward, and more real progress will be made in five years than 
can be made in a century of experimenting with existing electrical 
apparatus. 

You can add wings and stories to an old house. But to build a 
new house, you must begin with the foundation. 



General Office 




!©©tri(D 



Schenectady, N. Y. 



318 




Notaseme Hosiery Co., Pliiladelphia, Pa., SS,Ono Srj. Ft. 



A man is known by the company he keeps — 

And a company is known by the clients it 
keeps and the length of time it keeps them. 

80% of Turner's work to date has been re- 
peat order business. 

In Philadelphia and vicinity we have re- 
cently built for 

H. O. Wilbur & Co.. Pliiladelphia, Pa. - -} Building-s 
Notaseme Hosiery Co., Philadelphia, Pa. t2 Buildings 
American Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. - 3 Buildings 
Wall Rope Works. Beverly, N. J. - 3 Buildings 



"TURNER for CONCRETE" 

Turner Construction Company 

PHILADELPHIA ATLANTA NEW YORK CITY BUFFALO BOSTON 

Presser Building 140 PeachtreeSt. 244 Madison .A. ve. 11 Goodell St. Oliver Ditson Bldg. 
1713 Samson Street 178 Tremont Street 



319 



A NEW ROSE SPECIES— THE MOST FLORIFER- 
OUS PERFECTLY HARDY, BRIGHT 
YELLOW ROSE 



<< 



HUGONIS" 



BLOOMS TEN DAYS EARLIER THAN 
ANY OTHER ROSE 

Mrs. Dr. W. Van Fleet, Washington, D. C, spring 
1917, said to our President, Robert Pyle: "We had 
Hugonis in bloom during the last snowstorm, and I never 
saw a more beautiful sight." 

We are constantly on the lookout for new good Roses, 
and we believe we were the first Rose growers in this 
country to recognize the value of Hugonis. Our original 
stock was secured by Mr. Pyle in 1911, when on a visit to 
England, and came direct from stock raised from seed 
from North Central China. Mr. E. H. Wilson, of the 
Arnold Arboretum, describes Hugonis as follows: "It is 
an upright-growing shrub 6 to 8 feet tall, and more in 
diameter, with slender and spreading branches. The 
single, fragrant flowers, each about 2^ inches across, 
are produced all along the branches, and so freely are 
they borne that the branches become yard-long sprays 
of soft yellow. 

Hugonis is indeed the herald of Roses, and you will 
find it offered in three sizes, with almost four hundred 
other choice varieties in our 

1921 Spring Floral Guide 

which we will be glad to send free on recjuest. \\'rite 
for it to-day. 



SPECIAL OFFER— If you mention "The 1922 Halcyon" when 
ordering .$.5 worth of "Hugonis" Roses, we will present you 
with a copy of our 121-page book, "HOW TO GROW ROSES," 
by Robert Pyle, if you request it when ordering. 



THE CONARD & JONES CO. 

WEST GROVE, PA. 

ROBERT PYLE, President ANTOINE WINTZER, Vice-Pres. 



;;2u 



BEAVER COAL 



mil iiimiiiimiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitijiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiimiiiiitiiiiiii 



The Recognized Standard Among' 
Bituminous Coals 



Cortright Coal Company 

Pennsylvania Building Philadelphia, Pa. 



A Helpful Thought 



Be careful and discreet of your time, 

Considerate of your health, 

Jealous of your honor. 

Help make the day great for everyone with whom 
you come in contact. 

Work for the people whom you serve with all 3'our 
heart, with all your mind, with all your 
strength. 

For, in the glory and success of 3'our friends and 
associates is hidden the glory and success of your 

°^^'" ^^"'^- A FRIEND. 



■i-z\ 



CI)C 



Qboenif 



ALUMNI 

You are interested in the new President and any changes 
he may introduce at Swarthmore. You are interested in 
Swarthmore teams and Swarthmore activities. You are 
interested in your own classmates. Tlie PHOENIX is 
the best medium for securing accurate and up-to-date in- 
formation concerning these interests. 

UNDERGRADUATES 

If you would do your part in bringing back that old time 
Swarthmore- spirit and if you would show that you are 
backing Swarthmore activities — Support your college 
paper. 

JAMES F. BOGARDUS, '21 

Business Manager 

Subscription for one year . - - $1.50 



Morton 
Chronicle Press 

GEORGE E. WHITAKEIi 

Proprietor 

Co 111 III e? •cinl Pi in ting 

Bell 'Phone 1()I9-J 
MORTON, PA. 



Liberty Electric 
Shoe Repairing Co. 

For first class shoe rcpyiriiif;, liriiit; 
your shoes to me and I will make them 
like new at moderate prices. All who 
send me a job may lie sure to get satis- 
faction. All work guaranteed good woi-k- 
manship, THE BEST LEATHER used. 

Don't Forget the Address, 

417 DARTMOUTH AVE. 



TENNIS AND GOLF 

A Full Line of Tennis Rackets and Golf Clubs on Hand 

\\"e are special representatives for the famous Bancroft Rackets 
used by the World's Champion and most of the prominent players in the 
United States. We also carry the Wright & Ditson and Harry C. Lee 
Rackets. 

Tennis Rackets restrung and Golf Clubs repaired a specialty. 



MITCHELL CS, NESS 



1335 Arch Street 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Electrical 
Supplies 

Frank H. Stewart 
Electric Co. 

Old Mint Building 
37-39 N. 7th St., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



The 

Peoples National 

Bank 

Sistersville, W. Va. 




CECIL F. SHALLCROSS W. GARDNER CKOWELL 

Presiilent Vico Pres. & Sec. 

T. MAGILL PATTERSON 

Asst. Secretary 



1825 — 19i!l 

The 

Pennsylvania Fire Insurance 
Company 

INCORPORATED 1825 
CHARTER PERPETUAL 

Office: 508-510 Walnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



Capital .---------$ 750,000.00 

Assets ---------- 9,280,906.88 

Net Surplus --------- 2,225,526.59 

Surplus to Policy Holders ------ 2,975,526.59 



Agencies in all the Principal Cities of the 
United States 

DIRECTORS 

Cecil F. Shallcross W. Gardner Crowell Henry I. Brown 

Joseph Wayne, Jr. Thos. DeWitt Cuyler Samuel T. Boiline 

J. R. McAllister Morris L. Clothier J. H. Cunmiings 

■Mi 




tratb J^atjcn Inn 



SWARTHMORE, PENNA. 



(ALWAYS OPEN) 



Do You Want a "Lunch" or a "Snack" ? 

Miss Wertz will welcome you to the 

PompaDout "^ea Eoom at the inn 

where you may have all sorts of 
dainties and some substantial. 

—TRY IT! 




JOHN B. SIMPSON 

T/ic College Girls 

Tailor 

914 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

DRESSES 

SKIRTS 

BLOUSES 

BLOOMERS 



Style Book a ?i d Samples on Request 



32.5 




Truly a Swarthmore Trad i|t ion 




Kodaks 



CHOCOLATES 

with SWARTHMORE SEAL and COLORS 

A Worthy Souvenir of Happy Days. 

A Thoughtful Gift for the One who 
Appreciates your Alma Mater. 

A full line of Whitman's Chocolates 
always at 

VICTOR D. SHIRER 
Druggist 



Pennants 

Students' Supplies 



o-2(i 




TANGLED Ul' AUAIN 



Bell 327-W 



Open All Nigrht 

Arcadia Restaurant 

Good Things to Eat 

NICHOLAS THEODORE, Prop. 
107 West State St. MEDIA, PA. 

Ideal Theater 

Morton 

"Photoplays of 

Quality" 



Showing the Newest and Best of the 
Screen's Offerings 



Wednesdays — 
7:20 and 9:00 

Saturdays — 
2:30, 7:20 and 9:00 



Joseph C. Ferouson, Jr. 

Optical Goods 

Kodaks and Kodalc 

Supplies 



Developing and Printing 
for the Amateur 



Opposite 15th Street Exit 
Broad Street Station 



6-8 and 10 South 15th Street 
PHILADELPHIA 




Chartered by Continental Congress 1781 



The 

Bank q/ north America 

{National Bank 186 4) 



307 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia 



Capital - - - - 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 
Total Resources 



$ 1,000,000.00 
2,489,289.53 

34,840,689.52 



Officers 

E. PUSEY PASSMOEE, Presi.lent EICHARD S. McKINLEY, Vice President 

E. S. KKOMER, Cashier 

WILLIAM J. MUEPHY, Assistant Cashier CHARLES M. PEINCE, Assistant Cashier 

JOHN W. WHITING, Assistant Cashier 

Directors 



LINCOLN K. PASSMORE 

JOHN W. PEARCE 

JOHN P. GREEN 

GEORGE FALES BAKER, M. D. 

N. MYEES FITLER 

CHRISTIAN C. FEBIGER 

J. HOWELL CUMMINGS 

W. PERCY SIMPSON 

WALTER H. ROSSMASSLER 

CHARLES B. DUNN 

HOEACE E. SMITH 



HAREY S. EHRET 

EDWAED F. HENSON 

THEEON I. CEANE 

GRAHAME WOOD 

W. KIRKLAND DWIEE 

WILLIAM F. READ, JE. 

LEONARD T. BEALE 

MARVIN A. NEELAND 

JAMES D. C. HENDERSON 

WALTER ERBEN 

E. PUSEY PASSMORE 



:jiS 



Media Confectionery Company 

Home-Made CANDIES 

Ice Cream, Sundaes 

and Sodas 



23 West State Street 



Media, Penna. 



The UTILITY SHOP 

C. M. MARSH 

11 S. Chester Road 



Haberdashery 



Notions Novelties Cards Gifts 



The 

Marot FlowerjShop 

CUT FLOWERS 

Plants Baskets 

Bouquets for all occasions 

made to order 

Hours: 9 to 12, 2 to 6 (Except Sunday) 
Open Saturdays Until 8 P. M. 

Phone 554 415 Dartmouth Avenue 



JOSEPH T. SULLIVAN 



MARSHALL P. SULLIVAN 



Creth & Sullivan 



General Insurance 



210 South Fourth Street 



PHILADELPHM 



329 



fT^ 



e 









OPTICIANS 

7^ Spectacles : Eye Glasses 

/ Broken Lenses Replaced 

^~\ Prescriptions l''illefl Pi-omptly 



r 



JE.LimeEurnerGb. 

1720 Chestnut Street PHILADELPHIA 



D. A. MacGregor & Bro. 

Painters 

Interior Decorating 

Exterior Painting 

Hardwood Finishing 
Floor Finishing 



1628 Vine Street 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



DANIEL B. SHEPP, President 



EDGAR A. MURPHY, Sec'y-Treas. 



MURPHY-PARKER CO. 



Edition Book Binders 



N. W. Cor. Seventh and Arch Streets 



PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



;;:;u 



WALTER T. KARCHER 
and LIVINGSTON SMITH 



-Architects- 



it South 17th Street, PHILADELPHIA 




The fellow that put the 
Dash in Haberdashery 

CHARLIE KLEIN 

77ic 
Haberdasher 

912 Main Street DARBY, PA. 



Laurel-in-the-Pines 

LAKEWOOD, N. J. 

Situated Among the Pines and 
Overlooking Lake Carasaljo 

a New "Palm Grill"— 18-hole Golf 
Course, Horseback Riding, Motor- 
ing, Picturesque Walks, Music, 
Private Garage, New Electro-hy- 
drotherapy Bath System. 

Frank F. Shute, Mgr. 



331 



ABDOMINAL BELTS BRACES ELASTIC STOCKINGS 



Orthopaedic 

Appliances 

Made to Order 



Male and Female 
Attendants 




Trusses 

Crutches 

Suspensories 

Bell Plione 
Walnut 6916 



Post Operative Supporters 

Chesterman & Streeter 25 S. 11th Street, Philadelphia 



A. R. Justice Co. 

]Vh<)If'sah' 

Silverware, Cut Glass, 
Prize Cups, Etc. 

3[iui'ii/artnrerx of 

U-Kan Plate Silver Polish 
612 Chestnut St. PHILADELPHIA 




The Little Minister 



Courtesy Shop 



Candies, Pastries, Lunches, 
Cigars, Sodas, Ice Cream 



Oualitv — Catering — Service 



BARSKY & McMULLEN 

13 Morton Avenue, MORTON, PA. 



THE man who buys a 
Kelly- Springfield tire 
simply because it is the 
highest-priced tire has a 
very silly reason for doing a 
very sensible thing. There 
is nothing snobbish about a 
Kelly. Figured on a cost- 
per-mile basis it is actually 
the cheapest tire you can 
buy : : : : 




333 



E. CiMivncu MillL-r Established IS64 Hciii'y IJ. Wicl.iiul 

Walter H. Lippincott Harry B. Ireland 

E. Cur/.on Poultnev 



BIOREN & CO. 

Bankers 



Deal in Government, Municipal, Railroad and 
Public Utility Securities. 

Execute Stock Exchange Orders in All 
Markets. 

Transact a General Banking Business. 



410 Chestnut Street PHILADELPHIA 



(Tljester Olmes 



5 Job Printing Department in the nearest big, 
complete printing plant to Swarthmore College. 
The students find it convenient to order their 
printing at theTimes office, Chester, Pennsylvania 

OFFICIAL PRINTERS 

for the 

PHOENIX 

THE LARGEST SWARTHMORE PUBLICATION 



334 




PEIRCE SCHOOL 

of Business 
Administration 



Courses of Study 

Business Adniiiiistration 

Two-Year Commercial Training 

Secretarial 

Salesmansliip 

Teaclier Training 

Accounting 



:'j(itli Annual Catalogue anil Illustrated 
Booklet sent upon application 



PEIRCE SCHOOL 

Pine Street, West of Broad PHILADELPHIA 

Bonds for Investment 

High Grade Railroad and Industrial Bonds Suitable for Careful 
Investors Always on Our List. Inquiries Are Invited. 



PARRISH <Sl CO. 

Members of New York and Philadelphia 
Stock Exchanare 



Morris L. Parrish 
Geo. R. McClellan 

1500 Walnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



Pereival Parrisli, '96 
Alfred E. Norris 



115 Broadway 
NEW YORK 



Phones— Phila.: Bell, Sjiruce 1020; Keystone, Eace 40.50. Xew York: Rector 0440 



335 



JOHN M.DOYLE 

Memorial Tablf^' 

liSTHIRDSTPHlLADEC 



CATALOGUE ON REOtJESt. 



Bell Phone 531 -W 

Cameron Donate 

Fruit, Vegetables, 
Fish and Oysters 

Cor. Park and Chester Road 

SWARTHMORE, PA. 



Crisp, Crunchy Puffs of Goodness! 

Here's a toasty treat that melts in your mouth. A fairy-like 
confection that tickles the palate as nothing else does. Try a 
carton today ! 

Butter-Kist 




Popcorn 



is untouched by hands. Each 
grain is kist by pure golden but- 
ter. Then it's kept warm and 
toasty for you. You can buy 
Butter-Kist all over the world. 
Swarthmore has its Butter-Kist 
machine at 11 South Chester 
Road. 



Flounder's Candy Shop 

Opposite Pastime Theater 

CONFECTIONS, 

ICE CREAM AND 

SODAS 



State Street 



MEDIA 



Tables for Ladies 



Excellent Service 



Louis Restaurant 

Serving the best 

of Everything at 

Popular Price.i 



nil- Main Street 



DAK BY. PA. 



836 



Compliments of 
a Friend 



T. Brooks McBride 

Wholesale 
Confectioner 

Agency for SCHRAFFT'S 

BOSTON, MASS. 
Purveyor to the Cracker-room 



J37 



Wm. Bertsch &l Co. 

Y. M. C. A. 
HAND BOOKS 

a Specialty 

N. E. Corner 6th and Arch Streets 
PHILADELPHIA 



H. D. REESE 

Meats 

1203 Filbert Street 
Philadelphia 



HIGHLAND DAIRY FARM 

All Milk Products 

Colonial Ice Cream, Sodas 

Candy : Cigars 

Quick Lunch 



Phone 18 



407 Dartmouth 



On your way home take a BRICK of 

SHARPLESS 
Ice Cream 





The BANK 

of SAFETY and 

SERVICE 

Bfliiud the "Safety" stands $1U0,0(IU 
capital and $350,000 of earned siir- 
]iliis and profits, left in the busi- 
ness for protection of depositors. 
Behind the "Service" are nearly 60 
years of "knowing how" and a 
thorough]}' modern equipment of 
building, machines and methods. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



of MEDIA 



T. SCOTT EVANSON 

Wholesale 

Automobile Accessories 
and Equipment 

1533 Cherry Street 
Philadelphia 



339 



FRENCH'S 

PAINTS and VARNISHES 

''Quality First'' 
Consult Us About Your Paint Problems 

SAMUEL H. FRENCH CO. 

Philadelphia Camden 

Established 1844 — Incorporated 1920 
845 192 1 

^vianbs (Tentral Scl)Ool S^^tem 

From Kindergarten to College 
Guarded Education Governed by a Committee of Friends 

Elementary Schools Throughout the City 

Athletics, Art, Manual Training, Festivals 

Modern Equipment Small Classes Expert Faculty 

YEAR BOOK 

Apply to CHARLES B. WALSH, Principal 

Fifteenth and Race Streets, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

340 



Use 

WHITEHALL 

PORTLAND 

CEMENT 

In Your 
Work 



The, 



WHITEHALL CEMENT 
MANUFACTURING CO. 

Land Title Building 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



341 



K SIgIioilci-, M 

PHILADELPHIA 

Honor Roll Tablets, Fiviternity Emblems, 

Riiif^s, Seals. Charms, Plaques, Medals, Ete. 

iif thr llrller kind 



THE GIFT BOOK-Mailed Upon Request. 

Illustrating and Pricing: Graduation 

'and Other Gifts. 



MILLER-COSTUMER 

236 South Eleventh Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



dostumes of Every Description— Wigs, 
Beards — Mustaches — Face Paints — 
Minstrel Costumes — Chair Covers — 
Animal Costumes and Heads— Masks of 
all Popular Characters. On Hire Day or 
Week. Reasonable Rates. First-Class 

Goods. Bell Phone, Walnut 1892 



ARE YOU EVER HUNGRY 

for 

Hot Crispy Toast 
Country Sausage and Hot Cakes 
Delicious Chocolate Blisses 
Dinners That "Taste Like Home" 

// so Yoit should go to the 

Ingleneuk 
Tea Room 

120 PARK AVE. 

Open Every Day From 12 to 7 
Sundays— 9 to 10:30; 1:15 to 2 



Get the Habit— 

Come to buy your TENNIS SHOES also LADIES' and 
GENT'S FURNISLILNGS from 



H. L. SAKS 



open Every Night 



No. 7 Morton Avenue 

MORTON, PA. 





FROM THE TOP O'JERSEY 
TOJTHE VIRGINIA CAPES | 

^Werywhere 




iJ. 



Importer and Dealer 

Window Glass, Polished 
Plate, Picture Glass, 
Plain and Wire Skylight 
Glass, Etc. 

Glass for every requirement in 
the construetion of buildings. 

Special Glass for special pur- 
poses. 

PHONES: 

Bell-Market 641 
Keystone— Main 1020 

205 to 211 N. Fourth Street 
(4th and Race Sts.) 
PHILADELPHIA 



New York 



Established 1818 



Boston 



BROWN BROTHERS & CO. 

Fourth and Chestnut Streets 
Philadelphia 

Traveler's Letters of Credit 

Commercial Letters of Credit 

Bills of Exchange and Cable Transfers 

Deposit Accounts and Certificates of Deposit 
Carefully Selected Investment Securities 



A General Banking Business Transacted 



BROWN SHIPLEY & CO. 
London 



343 



The Great Fire Insurance Company of ihe World 

™JiyERPOOL 




London 
Globe 



AND 

AND 



of Livei'pool, I: Poland 

(ASTOCKCOMPANY) 



Harry W. Stephenson, Local Mmiager, Philadelphia and Suburban Dept. 
331-37 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



HARRY HERZBERG'S 




Executive Ofifice No. 1725 Chestnut Street 

Bell Phone 
Spruce 2840 Wyoming 6472-W 



34i 



Established 1908 



Incorporated 1916 



McENTIRE & COMPANY 

College and Fraternity Stationery 
and Jewelry 

ENGRAVING and PRINTING 
of the Better Kind 



10-11 Chestnut Street 



PHILADELPHIA 



See FRANK DUDLEY, Swarthmore 1922 
Representative 



Superior Clothes 
Moderate Prices 



EDWARD R. WILLIAMS 

Exclusive Tailor for 

Better Dressed 

Men 



1306 Walnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA 



Charles W. Haldeman J. (_i. Haldeman Est. 

J. G. Haldeman 
& Bro. 

Produce Commission Merchants 
and Wholesale Grocers 



Mother's Delight Canned Goods. 

Near By Butter and Eggs 

Our Own Millc Fed Poultry 

Hospitals, Hotels and Institutions Supplied 

Receiving and Feeding Station. 

Harrisonburg, Va. 



2918-24 Market Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



345 



Swart^more ^Jtational ^ank 



SWARTHMORE. PA. 




STUDENTS' cylCCOUNTS 
SOLICITED 



Officers 

EDWARD B. TEMPLE 
President 

CHARLES D. JOYCE 
Vice President 

ELRIC S. SPROAT 
Cashier 

A. M. PASSMORE 
Assistant Cashier 



Directors 

Edward B. Temple 

Joseph Swain 

Chas. Paxon 

Chas. D. Joyce 

John F. Murray 

J. Everton Ramsey 

Thomas S. Safford 

C. Percy Webster 

Garret E. Smedley 



346 



I. H. Wisler & Son 

Mamifaftiircrs of all kinds of 

Chairs and 
Rockers 



MARTIN I. WISLER 
Class of '76 

993-.2,5 N. Sixth St. PHILADELPHIA 



Do you cherish the hope 
of Some Day Living Near 

YOUR ALMA MATER 

If so I can be of Service to you. 
Delaware County HOMES and 
FARMS my Specialty. 

Eugene M. Chambers 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 

210 W. State Street MEDIA, PA. 



Establislicd 1837 



Incorporated 1919 



Wholesale Druggists 

Manufacturers of 

PAINTS and VARNISHES 



N. E. Cor. Fourth and Race Streets 



PHILADELPHIA 




MK. I.AXIIOX AT AVIIRK 



Williams, Darnell 
& Company 

Anthracite 

COAL 

Bituminous 



Drexel Building Phil.adelphla 



3a7 




When the Pioneers Faced Westward — 

As eai-ly as 1803 the development of the inland empire of America 
was beginning. The vast Louisiana Purchase had been consummated. 
Explorers penetrated to Pike's Peak and the Paciiic Coast. "Prairie 
Schooners" followed in their wake. 

The Insurance Company of North America (founded December 10, 
1792) kept pace with the Nation's progress. In the great Middle West, 
agfencies were established in Lexino-ton, Frankfort and Louisville, Cin- 
cinnati, Chillicothe, Steuben\'ille, and many other cities which then had 
only a few hundreds population. 

Pioneering— the "NORTH AMERICA" has strode steadily for- 
ward. To-day it offers to American Industry the widest range of insur- 
ance protection. 

ItiiTuranco Compativ* of* 

North America 

PHILADELPHIA 

"The Oldest American Fire and Marine Insurance Company** 



UH 



The West Jersey Paper Ndirufacturino Company 

Manufacturers of 

W. J. No. 10 TEMPLATE BOARD 

A Substitute for Wood, Used by 
All Shipbuilding Companies 

Front and Elm Streets ' CAMDEN, N. J. 



When You Go on a Picnic 
or a Hike 

There is nothing so tasty — so nourishing — so satis- 
fying to outdoor appetites as 

Wilmar Peanut Butter 

Always be sure to have Wilmar on hand — it's made 

from the best peanuts obtainable and cannot be sur- 

J ^^'^^ passed for automobile parties, canoe trips, camping, 

, , . , etc. You can carry Wilmar right along in the conven- 

the land & & 

" So Different ^^"'- S'^^^ J^'' '^ comes in. The jar fits any lunch-box 

from the ^nd the peanut butter comes out all fresh and ready 

Ordinary" for the finest kind of spread for bread or crackers. 

WILMAR MFG. CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Charles H. Howell & Co. 



INCORPORATED 



Mnkrrn of 

Paint Colors and Varnishes 

212-220 RACE Street PHILADELPHIA 

349 



COMPREHENSIVE SERVICE 

The Security Trust & ^afe Deposit Company offers you a compre- 
hensive service in financial matters — has a Savings Department in which 
4% interest is Paid on Deposits. 

It has .a large Commercial Department with every facility and con- 
\enience, where Checking Accounts are welcome and inxited. 

In its Trust Department is afforded expert attention and care to 
the management of estates — and it is a prudent appointment as Execu- 
tor or Trustee. 

SECURITY TRUST and SAFE DEPOSIT CO. 

Sixth and Market Streets 
WILMINGTON, DEL. 



Established 17 Years 

The PIE SHOP 

Home-made Bread, Rolls, Pies, Cakes and Pastries 
F'ull Line of Sundaes 

REGULAR MEALS 
Steaks, Chops, Oysters in Season 

Table Parties Arranged Picnic Parties at Short Notice 

330 



Stein-Bloch Smart Clothes 
We "Alco" Clothing 

and 

Hart Schaffner & Marx 
Clothing 

For cTVIen and Young cTVlen 

The Best Ready- to -Wear Clothing 
in the World 



cTVIen's Custom Tailoring 

High-Class Fabrics, Correct Styles, Fit 
and Workmanship Guaranteed 



Sold in Philadelphia Exclusively by 



Strawbridge (^ Clothier 



351 



Founded 1892 



Incorporated 1921 



@tDartl)more Qreparatorp 

for BOYS 

Small Classes— Special Emphasis on Fundamentals and College 

Entrance. Gymnasium, Swimming Pool and All 

Athletics. Ten Minutes from the College. 

W. P. ToMLiNSON, M. A., Headmaster 



BUCK HILL FALLS m 



the POCONO MOUNTAINS 



Established by friends for friends and friendly people 

We aim to have every comfort and convenience, without useless display. 
All the same, interesting attractions. We have in the Poconos the best 
air in America. Cottages or the Inn available for the Summer — The 
WINTER INN available for the Winter. 



THE BUCK HILL FALLS CO. 



Buck Hill Falls, Pa. 




ESTABLISHED 1818 




UjC 



(pmfkmtnS ^urnisl|ing ^060, 

MADISON AVENUE COR. FOBTY-FOUBTH STREET 
NEW YORK 

Tilcphoiie Jhirrai/ UlU SSan 

This is a complete Establishment 

operated continuously 

for more than One Hundred Years 

under the same name 

and still in the control of the 

Direct Descendants of the Founders 

We specialize in the Outfitting 

of Men and Boys from Head to Foot 

with Garments and Accessories 

for Every Requirement of 

Day or Evening Wear 

Dress, Business, Travel or Sport 

Ilhistrated Cdfaloi/iic on lieqiiest 



COMMEXCEMENT. 1!I22 



352 



Compliments of 

Pennsylvania Military 
College 




5 A school that surrounds its girls with the quiet refinement of true 
culture. Its personality is well expressed in its homelike character- 
istics. It is a dwelling-place of happy, wholesome comradeship, and 
the sincerity of family life. 

5 A widely varied course gives splendid preparation for college. Ad- 
ditional intensive courses in Music, Art and Literature add the best 
cultural influences. Seven Gables for girls 11 to 14, and Hillcrest for 
younger girls, also Wildcliff, a graduate school, are separate parts of 
The Mary Lyon School, extending its wonderful influence and ideals. 

*] The environment offers in- 

ducement to healthy outdoor 
life, horseback riding, canoe- 
ing and hiking. A separate 
catalogue sent for each school. 



t/~s— I5J5 






MR. and MRS. H. M. CRIST 

Principals 

SWARTHMORE, PA. 




353 



BARCLAY WHITE & CO. 

Incorporated 

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS and BUILDERS 



1713 Sansom Street 



PHILADELPHIA 







"El IJ Uh -1 




^' 



n Si! 



iil 









Iti 



B i!? ih!^. 



5,1 ?:! ElJ' 



f^fv 






Contractors for "Hicks Hall," Swarthmore College 

Walter T. Karcher and Livingston Smith, Architects 

Also for "Trotter Laboratory" Construction Started April, 1920 



E. A. WRIGHT 
COMPANY 

Broad and Huntingdon Streets 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Engravers - Printers 
Stationers 



Commencement Invitations 
Dance Programs Class Jewelry 

Calling Cards Menus 

Stationery Leather Souvenirs 

Wedding Stationery 



Dean Caldwell 

GENERAL 
INSURANCE 

Every Kind 
Everywhere 



718 Widener Building 
PHILADELPHIA 

327 Woodward Building 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



854 



OFFICIAL 



Photographer 



Year 191949204921 




THE GILBERT STUDIO 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 
926 Chestnut Street 



THIS IS THE PLANT 

Engraving : Printing 
Binding 

ALL UNDER ONE ROOF 




■T"rrr"rfTr sc^ 4^f~i ■?■ 



Eaildings Owned antt Exclusively Occupiisd by GRIT 

Makers of the 1922 Halcyon 

College and School Half-tone and Line Engraving 

Especially Solicited. Write Us Before 

Placing Your Next Order 



Grit Publishing Co. 



WlLLlAMSPORT, PA. 



3ot)